The Bodleian First Folio

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Reference: χgg1v - Histories, p. 88

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The second Part of King Henry the Fourth.

old: certaine shee's old: and had Robin Night‑worke, by

old Night‑worke, before I came to Clements Inne.

Sil.

That's fiftie fiue yeeres agoe.

Shal.

Hah, Cousin Silence, that thou hadst seene that,

[1705]

that this Knight and I haue seene: hah, Sir Iohn, said I

well?

Falst.

Wee haue heard the Chymes at mid‑night, Ma­

ster Shallow.

Shal.

That wee haue, that wee haue; in faith, Sir Iohn,

[1710]

wee haue: our watch‑word was, Hem‑Boyes. Come,

let's to Dinner; come, let's to Dinner: Oh the dayes that

wee haue seene. Come, come.

Bul.

Good Master Corporate Bardolph, stand my

friend, and heere is foure Harry tenne shillings in French

[1715]

Crownes for you: in very truth, sir, I had as lief be hang'd

sir, as goe: and yet, for mine owne part, sir, I do not care;

but rather, because I am vnwilling, and for mine owne

part, haue a desire to stay with my friends: else, sir, I did

not care, for mine owne part, so much.

Bard.
[1720]

Go‑too: stand aside.

Mould.

And good Master Corporall Captaine, for my

old Dames sake, stand my friend: shee hath no body to

doe any thing about her, when I am gone: and she is old,

and cannot helpe her selfe: you shall haue fortie, sir.

Bard.
[1725]

Go‑too: stand aside.

Feeble.

I care not, a man can die but once: wee owe a

death. I will neuer beare a base minde: if it be my desti­

nie, so: if it be not, so: no man is too good to serue his

Prince: and let it goe which way it will, he that dies this

[1730]

yeere, is quit for the next.

Bard.

Well said, thou art a good fellow.

Feeble.

Nay, I will beare no base minde.

Falst.

Come sir, which men shall I haue?

Shal.

Foure of which you please.

Bard.
[1735]

Sir, a word with you: I haue three pound, to

free Mouldie and Bull‑calfe.

Falst.

Go‑too: well.

Shal.

Come, sir Iohn, which foure will you haue?

Falst.

Doe you chuse for me.

Shal.
[1740]

Marry then, Mouldie, Bull‑calfe, Feeble,and

Shadow.

Falst.

Mouldie, and Bull‑calfe: for you Mouldie, stay

at home. till you are past seruice: and for your part, Bull‑ calfe , grow til you come vnto it: I will none of you.

Shal.
[1745]

Sir Iohn, Sir Iohn, doe not your selfe wrong, they

are your likelyest men, and I would haue you seru'd with

the best.

Falst.

Will you tell me (Master Shallow)how to chuse

a man? Care I for the Limbe, the Thewes, the stature,

[1750]

bulke, and bigge assemblance of a man? giue mee the

spirit (Master Shallow.) Where's Wart? you see what

a ragged appearance it is: hee shall charge you, and

discharge you, with the motion of a Pewterers Ham­

mer: come off, and on, swifter then hee that gibbets on

[1755]

the Brewers Bucket. And this same halfe‑fac'd fellow,

Shadow, giue me this man: hee presents no marke to the

Enemie, the foe‑man may with as great ayme leuell at

the edge of a Pen‑knife: and for a Retrait, how swiftly

will this Feeble, the Womans Taylor, runne off. O, giue

[1760]

me the spare men, and spare me the great ones. Put me a

Calyuer into Warts hand, Bardolph.

Bard.

Hold Wart, Trauerse: thus, thus, thus.

Falst.

Come, manage me your Calyuer: so: very well,

go‑too, very good, exceeding good. O, giue me alwayes

[1765]

a little, leane, old, chopt, bald Shot. Well said Wart, thou

art a good Scab: hold, there is a Tester for thee.

Image


[full image]

Right Column


Shal.

Hee is not his Crafts‑master, hee doth not doe

it right. I remember at Mile‑end‑Greene, when I lay

at Clements Inne, I was then Sir Dagonet in Arthures

[1770]

Show: there was a little quiuer fellow, and hee would

manage you his Peece thus: and hee would about,

and about, and come you in, and come you in: Rah,

tah, tah, would hee say, Bownce would hee say, and

away againe would hee goe, and againe would he come:

[1775]

I shall neuer see such a fellow.

Falst.

These fellowes will doe well, Master Shallow.

Farewell Master Silence, I will not vse many wordes with

you: fare you well, Gentlemen both: I thanke you:

I must a dozen mile to night. Bardolph, giue the Souldiers

[1780]

Coates.

Shal.

Sir Iohn, Heauen blesse you, and prosper your

Affaires, and send vs Peace. As you returne, visit

my house. Let our old acquaintance be renewed: per­

aduenture I will with you to the Court.

Falst.
[1785]

I would you would, Master Shallow.

Shal.

Go‑too: I haue spoke at a word. Fare you

well.

Exit. Falst.

Fare you well, gentle Gentlemen. On Bar­

dolph, leade the men away. As I returne, I will fetch off

[1790]

these Iustices: I doe see the bottome of Iustice Shal­ low . How subiect wee old men are to this vice of Ly­

ing? This same staru'd Iustice hath done nothing but

prate to me of the wildenesse of his Youth, and the

Feates hee hath done about Turnball‑street, and euery

[1795]

third word a Lye, duer pay'd to the hearer, then the

Turkes Tribute. I doe remember him at Clements Inne,

like a man made after Supper, of a Cheese‑paring. When

hee was naked, hee was, for all the world, like a forked

Radish, with a Head fantastically caru'd vpon it with a

[1800]

Knife. Hee was so forlorne, that his Dimensions (to

any thicke fight) were inuincible. Hee was the very

Genius of Famine: hee came euer in the rere­ward of

the Fashion: And now is this Vices Dagger become a

Squire, and talks as familiarly of Iohn of Gaunt, as if

[1805]

hee had beene sworne Brother to him: and Ile be sworne

hee neuer saw him but once in the Tilt‑yard, and then he

burst his Head, for crowding among the Marshals men.

I saw it, and told Iohn of Gaunt, hee beat his owne

Name, for you might haue truss'd him and all his Ap­

[1810]

parrell into an Eele‑skinne: the Case of a Treble Hoe­

boy was a Mansion for him: a Court: and now hath

hee Land, and Beeues. Well, I will be acquainted with

him, if I returne: and it shall goe hard, but I will make

him a Philosophers two Stones to me. If the young

[1815]

Dace be a Bayt for the old Pike, I see no reason, in the

Law of Nature, but I may snap at him. Let time shape,

and there an end.

Exeunt.
Actus Quartus. Scena Prima. [Act 4, Scene 1] Enter the Arch‑bishop, Mowbray, Hastngs, Westmerland, Coleuile. Bish. What is this Forrest call'd? Hast. Tis Gualtree Forrest, and't shall please your Grace. Bish.
[1820]
Here stand (my Lords) and send discouerers forth, To know the numbers of our Enemies.
Hast. Wee

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Actus Quartus. Scena Prima. [Act 4, Scene 1] Enter the Arch‑bishop, Mowbray, Hastngs, Westmerland, Coleuile. Bish. What is this Forrest call'd? Hast. Tis Gualtree Forrest, and't shall please your Grace. Bish.
[1820]
Here stand (my Lords) and send discouerers forth, To know the numbers of our Enemies.
Hast. Wee haue sent forth alreadie. Bish. 'Tis well done. My Friends, and Brethren (in these great Affaires)
[1825]
I must acquaint you, that I haue receiu'd New‑dated Letters from Northumberland: Their cold intent, tenure, and substance thus. Here doth hee wish his Person, with such Powers As might hold fortance with his Qualitie,
[1830]
The which hee could not leuie: whereupon Hee is rety r'd, to ripe his growing Fortunes, To Scotland; and concludes in heartie prayers, That your Attempts may ouer‑liue the hazard, And fearefull meeting of their Opposite.
Mow.
[1835]
Thus do the hopes we haue in him, touch ground, And dash themselues to pieces.
Enter a Messenger. Hast. Now? what newes? Mess. West of this Forrest, scarcely off a mile, In goodly forme, comes on the Enemie:
[1840]
And by the ground they hide, I iudge their number Vpon, or neere, the rate of thirtie thousand.
Mow. The iust proportion that we gaue them out. Let vs sway‑on, and face them in the field. Enter Westmterland. Bish. What well‑appointed Leader fronts vs here? Mow.
[1845]
I thinke it is my Lord of Westmerland.
West. Health, and faire greeting from our Generall, The Prince, Lord Iohn, and Duke of Lancaster. Bish. Say on (my Lord of Westmerland) in peace: What doth concerne your comming? West.
[1850]
Then (my Lord) Vnto your Grace doe I in chiefe addresse The substance of my Speech. If that Rebellion Came like it selfe, in base and abiect Routs, Led on by bloodie Youth, guarded with Rage,
[1855]
And countenanc'd by Boyes, and Beggerie: I say, if damn'd Commotion so appeare, In his true, natiue, and most proper shape, You (Reuerend Father, and these Noble Lords) Had not beene here, to dresse the ougly forme
[1860]
Of base, and bloodie Insurrection, With your faire Honors. You, Lord Arch‑bishop, Whose Sea is by a Ciuill Peace maintain'd, Whose Beard, the Siluer Hand of Peace hath touch'd, Whose Learning, and good Letters, Peace hath tutor'd,
[1865]
Whose white Inuestments figure Innocence, The Doue, and very blessed Spirit of Peace. Wherefore doe you so ill translate your selfe, Out of the Speech of Peace, that beares such grace, Into the harsh and boystrous Tongue of Warre?
[1870]
Turning your Bookes to Graues, your Inke to Blood, Your Pennes to Launces, and your Tongue diuine To a lowd Trumpet, and a Point of Warre.
Bish. Wherefore doe I this? so the Question stands. Briefely to this end: Wee are all diseas'd,
[1875]
And with our surfetting and wanton howres, Haue brought our selues into a burning Feuer, And wee must bleede for it: of which Disease, Our late King Richard (being infected) dy'd. But (my most Noble Lord of Westmerland)
[1880]
I take not on me here as a Physician, Nor doe I, as an Enemie to Peace, Troope in the Throngs of Militarie men: But rather shew a while like fearefull Warre, To dyet ranke Mindes, sicke of happinesse,
[1885]
And purge th'obstructions, which begin to stop Our very Veines of Life: heare me more plainely. I haue in equall balance iustly weigh'd, What wrongs our Arms may do, what wrongs we suffer, And finde our Griefes heauier then our Offences.
[1890]
Wee see which way the streame of Time doth runne, And are enforc'd from our most quiet there, By the rough Torrent of Occasion, And haue the summarie of all our Griefes (When time shall serue) to shew in Articles;
[1895]
Which long ere this, wee offer'd to the King, And might, by no Suit, gayne our Audience: When wee are wrong'd, and would vnfold our Griefes, Wee are deny'd accesse vnto his Person, Euen by those men, that most haue done vs wrong.
[1900]
The dangers of the dayes but newly gone, Whose memorie is written on the Earth With yet appearing blood; and the examples Of every Minutes instance (present now) Hath put vs in these ill‑beseeming Armes:
[1905]
Not to breake Peace, or any Branch of it, But to establish here a Peace indeede, Concurring both in Name and Qualitie.
West. When euer yet was your Appeale deny'd? Wherein haue you beene galled by the King ?
[1910]
What Peere hath beene suborn'd, to grate on you, That you should seale this lawlesse bloody Booke Of forg'd Rebellion, with a Seale diuine?
Bish. My Brother generall, the Common‑Wealth, I make my Quarrell, in particular. West.
[1915]
There is no neede of any such redresse: Or if there were, it not belongs to you.
Mow. Why not to him in part, and to vs all, That feele the bruizes of the dayes before, And suffer the Condition of these Times
[1920]
To lay a heauie and vnequall Hand vpon our Honors?
West. O my good Lord Mowbray, Construe the Times to their Necessities, And you shall say (indeede) it is the Time, And not the King, that doth you iniuries.
[1925]
Yet for your part, it not appeares to me, Either from the King, or in the present Time, That you should haue an ynch of any ground To build a Griefe on: were you not restor'd To all the Duke of Norfolkes Seignories,
[1930]
Your Noble, and right well‑remembred Fathers?
Mow. What thing, in Honor, had my Father lost, That need to be reuiu'd, and breath'd in me? The King that lou'd him, as the State stood then, Was forc'd, perforce compell'd to banish him:
[1935]
And then, that Henry Bullingbrooke and hee Being mounted, and both rowsed in their Seates Their neighing Coursers daring of the Spurre, Their armed Staues in charge, their Beauers downe, Their eyes of fire, sparkling through sights of Steele,
[1940]
And the lowd Trumpet blowing them together: Then, then, when there was nothing could haue stay'd My Father from the Breast of Bulling brooke; O, when the King did throw his Warder downe, (His owne Life hung vpon the staffe hee threw)
[1945]
Then threw hee downe himselfe, and all their Liues, That by Indictment, and by dint of Sword, Haue since mis‑carried vnder Bullingbrooke.
West. You speak (Lord Mowbray) now you know not what. The Earle of Hereford was reputed then
[1950]
In England the most valiant Gentleman. Who knowes, on whom Fortune would then haue smil'd? But if your Father had beene Victor there, Hee ne're had borne it out of Couentry. For all the Countrey, in a generall voyce,
[1955]
Cry'd hate vpon him: and all their prayers, and loue, Were set on Herford, whom they doted on, And bless'd, and grac'd, and did more then the King. But this is meere digression from my purpose. Here come I from our Princely Generall,
[1960]
To know your Griefes; to tell you, from his Grace, That hee will giue you Audience: and wherein It shall appeare, that your demands are iust, You shall enioy them, euery thing set off, That might so much as thinke you Enemies.
Mow.
[1965]
But hee hath forc'd vs to compell this Offer, And it proceedes from Pollicy, not Loue.
West. Mowbray, you ouer‑weene to take it so: This Offer comes from Mercy, not from Feare. For loe, within a Ken our Army lyes,
[1970]
Vpon mine Honor, all too confident To giue admittance to a thought of feare. Our Battaile is more full of Names then yours, Our Men more perfect in the vse of Armes, Our Armor all as strong, our Cause the best;
[1975]
Then Reason will, our hearts should be as good. Say you not then, our Offer is compell'd.
Mow. Well, by my will, wee shall admit no Parley. West. That argues but the shame of your offence: A rotten Case abides no handling. Hast.
[1980]
Hath the Prince Iohn a full Commissison, In very ample vertue of hrs Father, To heare, and absolutely to determine Of what Conditions wee shall stand vpon?
West. That is intended in the Generals Name:
[1985]
I muse you make so slight a Question.
Bish. Then take (my Lord of Westmerland) this Schedule, For this containes our generall Grieuances: Each seuerall Article herein redress'd, All members of our Cause, both here, and hence,
[1990]
That are insinewed to this Action, Acquitted by a true substantiall forme, And present execution of our wills, To vs, and to our purposes confin'd, Wee come within our awfull Banks againe,
[1995]
And knit our Powers to the Arme of Peace.
West. This will I shew the Generall. Please you Lords, In sight of both our Battailes, wee may meete At either end in peace: which Heauen so frame, Or to the place of difference call the Swords,
[2000]
Which must decide it.
Bish. My Lord, wee will doe so. Mow. There is a thing within my Bosome tells me, That no Conditions of our Peace can stand. Hast. Feare you not, that if wee can make our Peace
[2005]
Vpon such large termes, and so absolute, As our Conditions shall consist vpon, Our Peace shall stand as firme as Rockie Mountaines.
Mow. I, but our valuation shall be such, That euery slight, and false‑deriued Cause,
[2010]
Yea, every idle, nice, and wanton Reason, Shall, to the King, taste of this Action: That were our Royall faiths, Martyrs in Loue, Wee shall be winnowed with so rough a winde, That euen our Corne shall seeme as light as Chaffe,
[2015]
And good from bad finde no partition.
Bish. No, no (my Lord) note this: the King is wearie Of daintie, and such picking Grieuances: For hee hath found, to end one doubt by Death, Reuiues two greater in the Heires of Life.
[2020]
And therefore will hee wipe his Tables cleane, And keepe no Tell‑tale to his Memorie, That may repeat, and Historie his losse, To new remembrance. For full well hee knowes, Hee cannot so precisely weede this Land,
[2025]
As his mis‑doubts present occasion: His foes are so en‑rooted with his friends, That plucking to vnfixe an Enemie, Hee doth vnfasten so, and shake a friend. So that this Land, like an offensiue wife,
[2030]
That hath enrag'd him on, to offer strokes, As he is striking, holds his Infant vp, And hangs resolu'd Correction in the Arme, That was vprear'd to execution.
Hast. Besides, the King hath wasted all his Rods,
[2035]
On late Offenders, that he now doth lacke The very Instruments of Chasticement: So that his power, like to a Fanglesse Lion May offer, but not hold.
Bish. 'Tis very true:
[2040]
And therefore be assur'd (my good Lord Marshal) If we do now make our attonement well, Our Peace, will (like a broken Limbe vnited) Grow stronger, for the breaking.
Mow. Be it so:
[2045]
Heere is return'd my Lord of Westmerland.
Enter Westmerland. West. The Prince is here at hand: pleaseth your Lordship To meet his Grace, iustl distance 'tweene our Armies ? Mow. Your Grace of Yorke, in heauen's name then forward. Bish. Before, and greet his Grace (my Lord) we come.
 

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   <head rend="italic center">Actus Quartus. Scena Prima.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 4, Scene 1]</head>
   <stage rend="center" type="entrance">Enter the Arch‑bishop, Mowbray, Hastngs,
      <lb/>Westmerland, Coleuile.</stage>
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      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="1818">What is this Forrest call'd?</l>
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      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
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      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="1820">Here stand (my Lords) and send discouerers forth,</l>
      <l n="1821">To know the numbers of our Enemies.</l>
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   <sp who="#F-2h4-has">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
      <l n="1822">Wee haue sent forth alreadie.</l>
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   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="1823">'Tis well done.</l>
      <l n="1824">My Friends, and Brethren (in these great Affaires)</l>
      <l n="1825">I must acquaint you, that I haue receiu'd</l>
      <l n="1826">New‑dated Letters from<hi rend="italic">Northumberland:</hi>
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      <l n="1827">Their cold intent, tenure, and substance thus.</l>
      <l n="1828">Here doth hee wish his Person, with such Powers</l>
      <l n="1829">As might hold fortance with his Qualitie,</l>
      <l n="1830">The which hee could not leuie: whereupon</l>
      <l n="1831">Hee is rety r'd, to ripe his growing Fortunes,</l>
      <l n="1832">To Scotland; and concludes in heartie prayers,</l>
      <l n="1833">That your Attempts may ouer‑liue the hazard,</l>
      <l n="1834">And fearefull meeting of their Opposite.</l>
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   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="1835">Thus do the hopes we haue in him, touch ground,</l>
      <l n="1836">And dash themselues to pieces.</l>
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   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter a Messenger.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-has">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
      <l n="1837">Now? what newes?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mess.</speaker>
      <l n="1838">West of this Forrest, scarcely off a mile,</l>
      <l n="1839">In goodly forme, comes on the Enemie:</l>
      <l n="1840">And by the ground they hide, I iudge their number</l>
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   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="1842">The iust proportion that we gaue them out.</l>
      <l n="1843">Let vs sway‑on, and face them in the field.</l>
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   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Westmterland.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="1844">What well‑appointed Leader fronts vs here?</l>
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   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="1845">I thinke it is my Lord of Westmerland.</l>
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   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1846">Health, and faire greeting from our Generall,</l>
      <l n="1847">The Prince, Lord<hi rend="italic">Iohn</hi>, and Duke of Lancaster.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="1848">Say on (my Lord of Westmerland) in peace:</l>
      <l n="1849">What doth concerne your comming?</l>
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      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1850">Then (my Lord)</l>
      <l n="1851">Vnto your Grace doe I in chiefe addresse</l>
      <l n="1852">The substance of my Speech. If that Rebellion</l>
      <l n="1853">Came like it selfe, in base and abiect Routs,</l>
      <l n="1854">Led on by bloodie Youth, guarded with Rage,</l>
      <l n="1855">And countenanc'd by Boyes, and Beggerie:</l>
      <l n="1856">I say, if damn'd Commotion so appeare,</l>
      <l n="1857">In his true, natiue, and most proper shape,</l>
      <l n="1858">You (Reuerend Father, and these Noble Lords)</l>
      <l n="1859">Had not beene here, to dresse the ougly forme</l>
      <l n="1860">Of base, and bloodie Insurrection,</l>
      <l n="1861">With your faire Honors. You, Lord Arch‑bishop,</l>
      <l n="1862">Whose Sea is by a Ciuill Peace maintain'd,</l>
      <l n="1863">Whose Beard, the Siluer Hand of Peace hath touch'd,</l>
      <l n="1864">Whose Learning, and good Letters, Peace hath tutor'd,</l>
      <l n="1865">Whose white Inuestments figure Innocence,</l>
      <l n="1866">The Doue, and very blessed Spirit of Peace.</l>
      <l n="1867">Wherefore doe you so ill translate your selfe,</l>
      <l n="1868">Out of the Speech of Peace, that beares such grace,</l>
      <l n="1869">Into the harsh and boystrous Tongue of Warre?</l>
      <l n="1870">Turning your Bookes to Graues, your Inke to Blood,</l>
      <l n="1871">Your Pennes to Launces, and your Tongue diuine</l>
      <l n="1872">To a lowd Trumpet, and a Point of Warre.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="1873">Wherefore doe I this? so the Question stands.</l>
      <l n="1874">Briefely to this end: Wee are all diseas'd,</l>
      <l n="1875">And with our surfetting and wanton howres,</l>
      <l n="1876">Haue brought our selues into a burning Feuer,</l>
      <l n="1877">And wee must bleede for it: of which Disease,</l>
      <l n="1878">Our late King<hi rend="italic">Richard</hi>(being infected) dy'd.</l>
      <l n="1879">But (my most Noble Lord of Westmerland)</l>
      <l n="1880">I take not on me here as a Physician,</l>
      <l n="1881">Nor doe I, as an Enemie to Peace,</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="1882">Troope in the Throngs of Militarie men:</l>
      <l n="1883">But rather shew a while like fearefull Warre,</l>
      <l n="1884">To dyet ranke Mindes, sicke of happinesse,</l>
      <l n="1885">And purge th'obstructions, which begin to stop</l>
      <l n="1886">Our very Veines of Life: heare me more plainely.</l>
      <l n="1887">I haue in equall balance iustly weigh'd,</l>
      <l n="1888">What wrongs our Arms may do, what wrongs we suffer,</l>
      <l n="1889">And finde our Griefes heauier then our Offences.</l>
      <l n="1890">Wee see which way the streame of Time doth runne,</l>
      <l n="1891">And are enforc'd from our most quiet there,</l>
      <l n="1892">By the rough Torrent of Occasion,</l>
      <l n="1893">And haue the summarie of all our Griefes</l>
      <l n="1894">(When time shall serue) to shew in Articles;</l>
      <l n="1895">Which long ere this, wee offer'd to the King,</l>
      <l n="1896">And might, by no Suit, gayne our Audience:</l>
      <l n="1897">When wee are wrong'd, and would vnfold our Griefes,</l>
      <l n="1898">Wee are deny'd accesse vnto his Person,</l>
      <l n="1899">Euen by those men, that most haue done vs wrong.</l>
      <l n="1900">The dangers of the dayes but newly gone,</l>
      <l n="1901">Whose memorie is written on the Earth</l>
      <l n="1902">With yet appearing blood; and the examples</l>
      <l n="1903">Of every Minutes instance (present now)</l>
      <l n="1904">Hath put vs in these ill‑beseeming Armes:</l>
      <l n="1905">Not to breake Peace, or any Branch of it,</l>
      <l n="1906">But to establish here a Peace indeede,</l>
      <l n="1907">Concurring both in Name and Qualitie.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1908">When euer yet was your Appeale deny'd?</l>
      <l n="1909">Wherein haue you beene galled by the King<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
      <l n="1910">What Peere hath beene suborn'd, to grate on you,</l>
      <l n="1911">That you should seale this lawlesse bloody Booke</l>
      <l n="1912">Of forg'd Rebellion, with a Seale diuine?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="1913">My Brother generall, the Common‑Wealth,</l>
      <l n="1914">I make my Quarrell, in particular.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1915">There is no neede of any such redresse:</l>
      <l n="1916">Or if there were, it not belongs to you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="1917">Why not to him in part, and to vs all,</l>
      <l n="1918">That feele the bruizes of the dayes before,</l>
      <l n="1919">And suffer the Condition of these Times</l>
      <l n="1920">To lay a heauie and vnequall Hand vpon our Honors?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1921">O my good Lord<hi rend="italic">Mowbray</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1922">Construe the Times to their Necessities,</l>
      <l n="1923">And you shall say (indeede) it is the Time,</l>
      <l n="1924">And not the King, that doth you iniuries.</l>
      <l n="1925">Yet for your part, it not appeares to me,</l>
      <l n="1926">Either from the King, or in the present Time,</l>
      <l n="1927">That you should haue an ynch of any ground</l>
      <l n="1928">To build a Griefe on: were you not restor'd</l>
      <l n="1929">To all the Duke of Norfolkes Seignories,</l>
      <l n="1930">Your Noble, and right well‑remembred Fathers?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="1931">What thing, in Honor, had my Father lost,</l>
      <l n="1932">That need to be reuiu'd, and breath'd in me?</l>
      <l n="1933">The King that lou'd him, as the State stood then,</l>
      <l n="1934">Was forc'd, perforce compell'd to banish him:</l>
      <l n="1935">And then, that<hi rend="italic">Henry Bullingbrooke</hi>and hee</l>
      <l n="1936">Being mounted, and both rowsed in their Seates</l>
      <l n="1937">Their neighing Coursers daring of the Spurre,</l>
      <l n="1938">Their armed Staues in charge, their Beauers downe,</l>
      <l n="1939">Their eyes of fire, sparkling through sights of Steele,</l>
      <l n="1940">And the lowd Trumpet blowing them together:</l>
      <l n="1941">Then, then, when there was nothing could haue stay'd</l>
      <l n="1942">My Father from the Breast of<hi rend="italic">Bulling brooke</hi>;</l>
      <l n="1943">O, when the King did throw his Warder downe,</l>
      <l n="1944">(His owne Life hung vpon the staffe hee threw)</l>
      <l n="1945">Then threw hee downe himselfe, and all their Liues,</l>
      <l n="1946">That by Indictment, and by dint of Sword,</l>
      <l n="1947">Haue since mis‑carried vnder<hi rend="italic">Bullingbrooke</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0412-0.jpg" n="92"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1948">You speak (Lord<hi rend="italic">Mowbray</hi>) now you know not what.</l>
      <l n="1949">The Earle of Hereford was reputed then</l>
      <l n="1950">In England the most valiant Gentleman.</l>
      <l n="1951">Who knowes, on whom Fortune would then haue smil'd?</l>
      <l n="1952">But if your Father had beene Victor there,</l>
      <l n="1953">Hee ne're had borne it out of Couentry.</l>
      <l n="1954">For all the Countrey, in a generall voyce,</l>
      <l n="1955">Cry'd hate vpon him: and all their prayers, and loue,</l>
      <l n="1956">Were set on<hi rend="italic">Herford</hi>, whom they doted on,</l>
      <l n="1957">And bless'd, and grac'd, and did more then the King.</l>
      <l n="1958">But this is meere digression from my purpose.</l>
      <l n="1959">Here come I from our Princely Generall,</l>
      <l n="1960">To know your Griefes; to tell you, from his Grace,</l>
      <l n="1961">That hee will giue you Audience: and wherein</l>
      <l n="1962">It shall appeare, that your demands are iust,</l>
      <l n="1963">You shall enioy them, euery thing set off,</l>
      <l n="1964">That might so much as thinke you Enemies.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="1965">But hee hath forc'd vs to compell this Offer,</l>
      <l n="1966">And it proceedes from Pollicy, not Loue.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1967">
         <hi rend="italic">Mowbray</hi>, you ouer‑weene to take it so:</l>
      <l n="1968">This Offer comes from Mercy, not from Feare.</l>
      <l n="1969">For loe, within a Ken our Army lyes,</l>
      <l n="1970">Vpon mine Honor, all too confident</l>
      <l n="1971">To giue admittance to a thought of feare.</l>
      <l n="1972">Our Battaile is more full of Names then yours,</l>
      <l n="1973">Our Men more perfect in the vse of Armes,</l>
      <l n="1974">Our Armor all as strong, our Cause the best;</l>
      <l n="1975">Then Reason will, our hearts should be as good.</l>
      <l n="1976">Say you not then, our Offer is compell'd.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="1977">Well, by my will, wee shall admit no Parley.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1978">That argues but the shame of your offence:</l>
      <l n="1979">A rotten Case abides no handling.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-has">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
      <l n="1980">Hath the Prince<hi rend="italic">Iohn</hi>a full Commissison,</l>
      <l n="1981">In very ample vertue of hrs Father,</l>
      <l n="1982">To heare, and absolutely to determine</l>
      <l n="1983">Of what Conditions wee shall stand vpon?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1984">That is intended in the Generals Name:</l>
      <l n="1985">I muse you make so slight a Question.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="1986">Then take (my Lord of Westmerland) this Schedule,</l>
      <l n="1987">For this containes our generall Grieuances:</l>
      <l n="1988">Each seuerall Article herein redress'd,</l>
      <l n="1989">All members of our Cause, both here, and hence,</l>
      <l n="1990">That are insinewed to this Action,</l>
      <l n="1991">Acquitted by a true substantiall forme,</l>
      <l n="1992">And present execution of our wills,</l>
      <l n="1993">To vs, and to our purposes confin'd,</l>
      <l n="1994">Wee come within our awfull Banks againe,</l>
      <l n="1995">And knit our Powers to the Arme of Peace.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="1996">This will I shew the Generall. Please you Lords,</l>
      <l n="1997">In sight of both our Battailes, wee may meete</l>
      <l n="1998">At either end in peace: which Heauen so frame,</l>
      <l n="1999">Or to the place of difference call the Swords,</l>
      <l n="2000">Which must decide it.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2001">My Lord, wee will doe so.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2002">There is a thing within my Bosome tells me,</l>
      <l n="2003">That no Conditions of our Peace can stand.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-has">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
      <l n="2004">Feare you not, that if wee can make our Peace</l>
      <l n="2005">Vpon such large termes, and so absolute,</l>
      <l n="2006">As our Conditions shall consist vpon,</l>
      <l n="2007">Our Peace shall stand as firme as Rockie Mountaines.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2008">I, but our valuation shall be such,</l>
      <l n="2009">That euery slight, and false‑deriued Cause,</l>
      <l n="2010">Yea, every idle, nice, and wanton Reason,</l>
      <l n="2011">Shall, to the King, taste of this Action:</l>
      <l n="2012">That were our Royall faiths, Martyrs in Loue,</l>
      <l n="2013">Wee shall be winnowed with so rough a winde,</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="2014">That euen our Corne shall seeme as light as Chaffe,</l>
      <l n="2015">And good from bad finde no partition.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2016">No, no (my Lord) note this: the King is wearie</l>
      <l n="2017">Of daintie, and such picking Grieuances:</l>
      <l n="2018">For hee hath found, to end one doubt by Death,</l>
      <l n="2019">Reuiues two greater in the Heires of Life.</l>
      <l n="2020">And therefore will hee wipe his Tables cleane,</l>
      <l n="2021">And keepe no Tell‑tale to his Memorie,</l>
      <l n="2022">That may repeat, and Historie his losse,</l>
      <l n="2023">To new remembrance. For full well hee knowes,</l>
      <l n="2024">Hee cannot so precisely weede this Land,</l>
      <l n="2025">As his mis‑doubts present occasion:</l>
      <l n="2026">His foes are so en‑rooted with his friends,</l>
      <l n="2027">That plucking to vnfixe an Enemie,</l>
      <l n="2028">Hee doth vnfasten so, and shake a friend.</l>
      <l n="2029">So that this Land, like an offensiue wife,</l>
      <l n="2030">That hath enrag'd him on, to offer strokes,</l>
      <l n="2031">As he is striking, holds his Infant vp,</l>
      <l n="2032">And hangs resolu'd Correction in the Arme,</l>
      <l n="2033">That was vprear'd to execution.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-has">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
      <l n="2034">Besides, the King hath wasted all his Rods,</l>
      <l n="2035">On late Offenders, that he now doth lacke</l>
      <l n="2036">The very Instruments of Chasticement:</l>
      <l n="2037">So that his power, like to a Fanglesse Lion</l>
      <l n="2038">May offer, but not hold.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2039">'Tis very true:</l>
      <l n="2040">And therefore be assur'd (my good Lord Marshal)</l>
      <l n="2041">If we do now make our attonement well,</l>
      <l n="2042">Our Peace, will (like a broken Limbe vnited)</l>
      <l n="2043">Grow stronger, for the breaking.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2044">Be it so:</l>
      <l n="2045">Heere is return'd my Lord of Westmerland.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Westmerland.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="2046">The Prince is here at hand: pleaseth your Lordship</l>
      <l n="2047">To meet his Grace, iustl distance 'tweene our Armies<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2048">Your Grace of Yorke, in heauen's name then
      <lb/>forward.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2049">Before, and greet his Grace (my Lord) we come.</l>
   </sp>
</div>

        
        

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