The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: χgg3v - Histories, p. 92

Left Column


The second Part of King Henry the Fourth. Enter Prince Iohn, and Westmerland. Iohn.
[2205]
The heat is past, follow no farther now: Call in the Powers, good Cousin Westmerland. Now Falstaffe, where haue you beene all this while? When euery thing is ended, then you come. These tardie Tricks of yours will (on my life)
[2210]
One time, or other, breake some Gallowes back.
Falst.

I would bee sorry (my Lord) but it should bee

thus: I neuer knew yet, but rebuke and checke was the

reward of Valour. Doe you thinke me a Swallow, an Ar­

row, or a Bullet? Haue I, in my poore and olde Motion,

[2215]

the expedition of Thought? I haue speeded hither with

the very extremest ynch of possibilitie. I haue fowndred

nine score and odde Postes: and heere (trauell‑tainted

as I am) haue, in my pure and immaculate Valour, taken

Sir Iohn Colleuile of the Dale, a most furious Knight, and

[2220]

valorous Enemie: But what of that? hee saw mee, and

yeelded: that I may iustly say with the hooke‑nos'd

fellow of Rome, I came, saw, and ouer‑came.

Iohn.

It was more of his Courtesie, then your deser­

uing.

Falst.
[2225]

I know not: heere hee is, and heere I yeeld

him: and I beseech your Grace, let it be book'd, with

the rest of this dayes deedes; or I sweare, I will haue it

in a particular Ballad, with mine owne Picture on the top

of it ( Colleuile kissing my foot:) To the which course, if

[2230]

I be enforc'd, if you do not all shew like gilt two‑pences

to me; and I, in the cleare Skie of Fame, o're‑shine you

as much as the Full Moone doth the Cynders of the Ele­

ment (which shew like Pinnes‑heads to her) beleeue not

the Word of the Noble: therefore let mee haue right,

[2235]

and let desert mount.

Iohn.

Thine's too heauie to mount.

Falst.

Let it shine then.

Iohn.

Thine's too thick to shine.

Falst.

Let it doe some thing (my good Lord) that may

[2240]

doe me good, and call it what you will.

Iohn.

Is thy Name Colleuile?

Col.

It is (my Lord.)

Iohn.

A famous Rebell art thou, Colleuile.

Falst.

And a famous true Subiect tooke him.

Col.
[2245]
I am (my Lord) but as my Betters are, That led me hither: had they beene rul'd by me, You should haue wonne them dearer then you haue.
Falst.

I know not how they sold themselues, but thou

like a kinde fellow, gau'st thy selfe away; and I thanke

[2250]

thee, for thee.

Enter Westmerland. Iohn. Haue you left pursuit? West. Retreat is made, and Execution stay'd. Iohn. Send Colleuile, with his Confederates, To Yorke, to present Execution.
[2255]
Blunt, leade him hence, and see you guard him sure. Exit with Collcuile. And now dispatch we toward the Court (my Lords ) I heare the King, my Father, is sore sicke. Our Newes shall goe before vs, to his Maiestie, Which (Cousin) you shall beare, to comfort him:
[2260]
And wee with sober speede will follow you.
Falst.

My Lord, I beseech you, giue me leaue to goe

through Gloucestershire: and when you come to Court,

stand my good Lord, 'pray, in your good report.

Iohn. Fare you well, Falstaffe: I, in my condition,
[2265]
Shall better speake of you, then you deserue.
Exit.

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Right Column


Falst.

I would you had but the wit: 'twere better

then your Dukedome. Good faith, this same young so­

ber‑blooded Boy doth nor loue me, nor a man cannot

make him laugh: but that's no maruaile, hee drinkes no

[2270]

Wine. There's neuer any of these demure Boyes come

to any proofe: for thinne Drinke doth so ouer‑coole

their blood, and making many Fish‑Meales, that they

fall into a kinde of Male Greene‑sicknesse: and then,

when they marry, they get Wenches. They are generally

[2275]

Fooles, and Cowards; which some of vs should be too,

but for inflamation. A good Sherris‑Sack hath a two­

fold operation in it: it ascends me into the Braine, dryes

me there all the foolish, and dull, and cruddie Vapours,

which enuiron it: makes it apprehensiue, quicke, forge­

[2280]

tiue, full of nimble, fierie, and delectable shapes; which

deliuer'd o're to the Voyce, the Tongue, which is the

Birth, becomes excellent Wit. The second propertie of

your excellent Sherris, is, the warming of the Blood:

which before (cold, and setled) left the Liuer white, and

[2285]

pale; which is the Badge of Pusillanimitie, and Cowar­

dize: but the Sherris warmes it, and makes it course

from the inwards, to the parts extremes: it illuminateth

the Face, which (as a Beacon) giues warning to all the

rest of this little Kingdome (Man) to Arme: and then

[2290]

the Vitall Commoners, and in‑land pettie Spirits, muster

me all to their Captaine, the Heart; who great, and pufft

vp with his Retinue, doth any Deed of Courage: and this

Valour comes of Sherris. So, that skill in the Weapon

is nothing, without Sack (for that sets it a‑worke:) and

[2295]

Learning, a meere Hoord of Gold, kept by a Deuill, till

Sack commences it, and sets it in act, and vse. Hereof

comes it, that Prince Harry is valiant: for the cold blood

hee did naturally inherite of his Father, hee hath, like

leane, stirrill, and bare Land, manured, husbanded, and

[2300]

tyll'd, with excellent endeauour of drinking good, and

good store of fertile Sherris, that hee is become very hot,

and valiant. If I had a thousand Sonnes, the first Principle

I would teach them, should be to forsweare thinne Pota­

tions, and to addict themselues to Sack.

Enter Bardolph.
[2305]

How now Bardolph?

Bard.

The Armie is discharged all, and gone.

Falst.

Let them goe: Ile through Gloucestershire,

and there will I visit Master Robert Shallow, Esquire: I

haue him alreadie tempering betweene my finger and my

[2310]

thombe, and shortly will I seale with him. Come away.

Exeunt.
Scena Secunda. [Act 4, Scene 4] Enter King, Warwicke, Clarence, Gloucester. King. Now Lords, if Heauen doth giue successefull end To this Debate, that bleedeth at our doores, Wee will our Youth lead on to higher fields, And draw no Swords, but what are sanctify'd.
[2315]
Our Nauie is addressed, our Power collected, Our Substitutes, in absence, well inuested, And every thing lyes leuell to our wish; Onely wee want a little personall Strength: And pawse vs, till these Rebels, now a‑foot,
[2320]
Come vnderneath the yoake of Gouernment.
War. Both which we doubt not, but your Maiestie Shall soone enioy. King. Hum­

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[Act 4, Scene 2] From this point in the act onwards, conventional scene numbering diverges from the First Folio. Enter Prince Iohn. Iohn.
[2050]
You are wel encountred here (my cosin Mowbray) Good day to you, gentle Lord Archbishop, And so to you Lord Hastings, and to all. My Lord of Yorke, it better shew'd with you, When that your Flocke (assembled by the Bell)
[2055]
Encircled you, to heare with reuerence Your exposition on the holy Text, Then now to see you heere an Iron man Chearing a rowt of Rebels with your Drumme, Turning the Word, to Sword; and Life to death:
[2060]
That man that sits within a Monarches heart, And ripens in the Sunne‑shine of his fauor, Would hee abuse the Countenance of the King, Alack, what Mischiefes might hee set abroach, In shadow of such Greatnesse? With you, Lord Bishop,
[2065]
It is euen so. Who hath not heard it spoken, How deepe you were within the Bookes of Heauen? To vs, the Speaker in his Parliament; To vs, th'imagine Voyce of Heauen it selfe: The very Opener, and Intelligencer,
[2070]
Betweene the Grace, the Sanctities of Heauen; And our dull workings. O, who shall beleeue, But you mis‑vse the reuerence of your Place, Employ the Countenance, and Grace of Heauen, As a false Fauorite doth his Princes Name,
[2075]
In deedes dis‑honorable ? You haue taken vp, Vnder the counterfeited Zeale of Heauen, The Subiects of Heauens Substitute, my Father, And both against the Peace of Heauen, and him, Haue here vp‑swarmed them.
Bish.
[2080]
Good my Lord of Lancaster, I am not here against your Fathers Peace: But (as I told my Lord of Westmerland) The Time (mis‑order'd) doth in common sence Crowd vs, and crush vs, to this monstrous Forme,
[2085]
To hold our safetie vp. I sent your Grace The parcels, and particulars of our Griefe, The which hath been with scorne shou'd from the Court: Whereon this Hydra‑Sonne of Warre is borne, Whose dangerous eyes may well be charm'd asleepe,
[2090]
With graunt of our most iust and right desires; And true Obedience, of this Madnesse cur'd, Stoope tamely to the foot of Maiestie.
Mow. If not, wee readie are to trye our fortunes, To the last man. Hast.
[2095]
And though wee here fall downe, Wee haue Supplyes, to second our Attempt: If they mis‑carry, theirs shall second them. And so, successe of Mischiefe shall be borne, And Heire from Heire shall hold this Quarrell vp,
[2100]
Whiles England shall haue generation.
Iohn. You are too shallow ( Hastings) Much too shallow, To sound the bottome of the after‑Times. West. Pleaseth your Grace, to answere them directly,
[2105]
How farre‑forth you doe like their Articles.
Iohn. I like them all, and doe allow them well: And sweare here, by the honor of my blood, My Fathers purposes haue beene mistooke, And some, about him, haue too lauishly
[2110]
Wrested his meaning, and Authoritie. My Lord, these Griefes shall be with speed redrest: Vpon my Life, they shall. If this may please you, Discharge your Powers vnto their seuerall Counties, As wee will ours: and here, betweene the Armies,
[2115]
Let's drinke together friendly, and embrace, That all their eyes may beare those Tokens home, Of our restored Loue, and Amitie.
Bish. I take your Princely word, for these redresses. Iohn. I giue it you, and will maintaine my word:
[2120]
And thereupon I drinke vnto your Grace.
Hast. Goe Captaine, and deliuer to the Armie This newes of Peace: let them haue pay, and part: I know, it will well please them. High thee Captaine. Exit. Bish.
[2125]
To you, my Noble Lord of Westmerland.
West. I pledge your Grace: And if you knew what paines I haue bestow'd, To breede this present Peace, You would drinke freely: but my loue to ye,
[2130]
Shall shew it selfe more openly hereafter.
Bish. I doe not doubt you. West. I am glad of it. Health to my Lord, and gentle Cousin Mowbray. Mow. You wish me health in very happy season,
[2135]
For I am, on the sodaine, something ill.
Bish. Against ill Chances, men are euer merry, But heauinesse fore‑runnes the good euent. West. Therefore be merry (Cooze) since sodaine sorrow Serues to say thus: some good thing comes to morrow. Bish.
[2140]
Beleeue me, I am passing light in spirit.
Mow. So much the worse, if your owne Rule be true. Iohn. The word of Peace is render'd: hearke how they showt. Mow. This had been chearefull, after Victorie. Bish. A Peace is of the nature of a Conquest:
[2145]
For then both parties nobly are subdu'd, And neither partie looser.
Iohn. Goe (my Lord) And let our Army be discharged too: And good my Lord (so please you) let our Traines
[2150]
March by vs, that wee may peruse the men Exit. Wee should haue coap'd withall.
Bish. Goe, good Lord Hastings: And ere they be dismiss'd, let them march by. Exit. Iohn. I trust (Lords) wee shall lye to night together. Enter Westmerland.
[2155]
Now Cousin, wherefore stands our Army still?
West. The Leaders hauing charge from you to stand, Will not goe off, vntill they heare you speake. Iohn.

They know their duties.

Enter Hastings. Hast. Our Army is dispers'd:
[2160]
Like youthfull steeres, vnyoak'd, they tooke their course East, West, North, South: or like a Schoole, broke vp, Each hurryes towards his home, and sporting place.
West. Good tidings (my Lord Hastings) for the which, I doe arrest thee (Traytor) of high Treason:
[2165]
And you Lord Arch‑bishop, and you Lord Mowbray, Of Capitall Treason, I attach you both.
Mow. Is this proceeding iust, and honorable? West. Is your Assembly so? Bish. Will you thus breake your faith? Iohn.
[2170]
I pawn'd thee none: I promis'd you redresse of these same Grieuances Whereof you did complaine; which, by mine Honor, I will performe, with a most Christian care. But for you (Rebels) looke to taste the due
[2175]
Meet for Rebellion, and such Acts as yours. Most shallowly did you these Armes commence, Fondly brought here, and foolishly sent hence. Strike vp our Drummes, pursue the scattder'd stray, Heauen, and not wee, haue safely fought to day.
[2180]
Some guard these Traitors to the Block of Death, Treasons true Bed, and yeelder vp of breath.
Exeunt.
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="2" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 4, Scene 2]</head>
   <note type="editorial" resp="#PW">From this point in the act onwards, conventional scene numbering diverges from the First Folio.</note>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Prince Iohn.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <l n="2050">You are wel encountred here (my cosin<hi rend="italic">Mowbray</hi>)</l>
      <l n="2051">Good day to you, gentle Lord Archbishop,</l>
      <l n="2052">And so to you Lord<hi rend="italic">Hastings</hi>, and to all.</l>
      <l n="2053">My Lord of Yorke, it better shew'd with you,</l>
      <l n="2054">When that your Flocke (assembled by the Bell)</l>
      <l n="2055">Encircled you, to heare with reuerence</l>
      <l n="2056">Your exposition on the holy Text,</l>
      <l n="2057">Then now to see you heere an Iron man</l>
      <l n="2058">Chearing a rowt of Rebels with your Drumme,</l>
      <l n="2059">Turning the Word, to Sword; and Life to death:</l>
      <l n="2060">That man that sits within a Monarches heart,</l>
      <l n="2061">And ripens in the Sunne‑shine of his fauor,</l>
      <l n="2062">Would hee abuse the Countenance of the King,</l>
      <l n="2063">Alack, what Mischiefes might hee set abroach,</l>
      <l n="2064">In shadow of such Greatnesse? With you, Lord Bishop,</l>
      <l n="2065">It is euen so. Who hath not heard it spoken,</l>
      <l n="2066">How deepe you were within the Bookes of Heauen?</l>
      <l n="2067">To vs, the Speaker in his Parliament;</l>
      <l n="2068">To vs, th'imagine Voyce of Heauen it selfe:</l>
      <l n="2069">The very Opener, and Intelligencer,</l>
      <l n="2070">Betweene the Grace, the Sanctities of Heauen;</l>
      <l n="2071">And our dull workings. O, who shall beleeue,</l>
      <l n="2072">But you mis‑vse the reuerence of your Place,</l>
      <l n="2073">Employ the Countenance, and Grace of Heauen,</l>
      <l n="2074">As a false Fauorite doth his Princes Name,</l>
      <l n="2075">In deedes dis‑honorable<c rend="italic">?</c>You haue taken vp,</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0413-0.jpg" n="91"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="2076">Vnder the counterfeited Zeale of Heauen,</l>
      <l n="2077">The Subiects of Heauens Substitute, my Father,</l>
      <l n="2078">And both against the Peace of Heauen, and him,</l>
      <l n="2079">Haue here vp‑swarmed them.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2080">Good my Lord of Lancaster,</l>
      <l n="2081">I am not here against your Fathers Peace:</l>
      <l n="2082">But (as I told my Lord of Westmerland)</l>
      <l n="2083">The Time (mis‑order'd) doth in common sence</l>
      <l n="2084">Crowd vs, and crush vs, to this monstrous Forme,</l>
      <l n="2085">To hold our safetie vp. I sent your Grace</l>
      <l n="2086">The parcels, and particulars of our Griefe,</l>
      <l n="2087">The which hath been with scorne shou'd from the Court:</l>
      <l n="2088">Whereon this<hi rend="italic">Hydra</hi>‑Sonne of Warre is borne,</l>
      <l n="2089">Whose dangerous eyes may well be charm'd asleepe,</l>
      <l n="2090">With graunt of our most iust and right desires;</l>
      <l n="2091">And true Obedience, of this Madnesse cur'd,</l>
      <l n="2092">Stoope tamely to the foot of Maiestie.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2093">If not, wee readie are to trye our fortunes,</l>
      <l n="2094">To the last man.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-has">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
      <l n="2095">And though wee here fall downe,</l>
      <l n="2096">Wee haue Supplyes, to second our Attempt:</l>
      <l n="2097">If they mis‑carry, theirs shall second them.</l>
      <l n="2098">And so, successe of Mischiefe shall be borne,</l>
      <l n="2099">And Heire from Heire shall hold this Quarrell vp,</l>
      <l n="2100">Whiles England shall haue generation.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <l n="2101">You are too shallow (<hi rend="italic">Hastings</hi>)</l>
      <l n="2102">Much too shallow,</l>
      <l n="2103">To sound the bottome of the after‑Times.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="2104">Pleaseth your Grace, to answere them directly,</l>
      <l n="2105">How farre‑forth you doe like their Articles.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <l n="2106">I like them all, and doe allow them well:</l>
      <l n="2107">And sweare here, by the honor of my blood,</l>
      <l n="2108">My Fathers purposes haue beene mistooke,</l>
      <l n="2109">And some, about him, haue too lauishly</l>
      <l n="2110">Wrested his meaning, and Authoritie.</l>
      <l n="2111">My Lord, these Griefes shall be with speed redrest:</l>
      <l n="2112">Vpon my Life, they shall. If this may please you,</l>
      <l n="2113">Discharge your Powers vnto their seuerall Counties,</l>
      <l n="2114">As wee will ours: and here, betweene the Armies,</l>
      <l n="2115">Let's drinke together friendly, and embrace,</l>
      <l n="2116">That all their eyes may beare those Tokens home,</l>
      <l n="2117">Of our restored Loue, and Amitie.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2118">I take your Princely word, for these redresses.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <l n="2119">I giue it you, and will maintaine my word:</l>
      <l n="2120">And thereupon I drinke vnto your Grace.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-has">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
      <l n="2121">Goe Captaine, and deliuer to the Armie</l>
      <l n="2122">This newes of Peace: let them haue pay, and part:</l>
      <l n="2123">I know, it will well please them.</l>
      <l n="2124">High thee Captaine.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2125">To you, my Noble Lord of Westmerland.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="2126">I pledge your Grace:</l>
      <l n="2127">And if you knew what paines I haue bestow'd,</l>
      <l n="2128">To breede this present Peace,</l>
      <l n="2129">You would drinke freely: but my loue to ye,</l>
      <l n="2130">Shall shew it selfe more openly hereafter.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2131">I doe not doubt you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="2132">I am glad of it.</l>
      <l n="2133">Health to my Lord, and gentle Cousin<hi rend="italic">Mowbray</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2134">You wish me health in very happy season,</l>
      <l n="2135">For I am, on the sodaine, something ill.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2136">Against ill Chances, men are euer merry,</l>
      <l n="2137">But heauinesse fore‑runnes the good euent.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="2138">Therefore be merry (Cooze) since sodaine sorrow</l>
      <l n="2139">Serues to say thus: some good thing comes to morrow.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2140">Beleeue me, I am passing light in spirit.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2141">So much the worse, if your owne Rule be true.</l>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <l n="2142">The word of Peace is render'd: hearke how
      <lb/>they showt.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2143">This had been chearefull, after Victorie.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2144">A Peace is of the nature of a Conquest:</l>
      <l n="2145">For then both parties nobly are subdu'd,</l>
      <l n="2146">And neither partie looser.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <l n="2147">Goe (my Lord)</l>
      <l n="2148">And let our Army be discharged too:</l>
      <l n="2149">And good my Lord (so please you) let our Traines</l>
      <l n="2150">March by vs, that wee may peruse the men</l>
      <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
      <l n="2151">Wee should haue coap'd withall.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2152">Goe, good Lord<hi rend="italic">Hastings:</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="2153">And ere they be dismiss'd, let them march by.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <l n="2154">I trust (Lords) wee shall lye to night together.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Westmerland.</stage>
      <l n="2155">Now Cousin, wherefore stands our Army still?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="2156">The Leaders hauing charge from you to stand,</l>
      <l n="2157">Will not goe off, vntill they heare you speake.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <p n="2158">They know their duties.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="entrance">Enter Hastings.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-has">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hast.</speaker>
      <l n="2159">Our Army is dispers'd:</l>
      <l n="2160">Like youthfull steeres, vnyoak'd, they tooke their course</l>
      <l n="2161">East, West, North, South: or like a Schoole, broke vp,</l>
      <l n="2162">Each hurryes towards his home, and sporting place.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="2163">Good tidings (my Lord<hi rend="italic">Hastings)</hi>for the which,</l>
      <l n="2164">I doe arrest thee (Traytor) of high Treason:</l>
      <l n="2165">And you Lord Arch‑bishop, and you Lord<hi rend="italic">Mowbray</hi>,</l>
      <l n="2166">Of Capitall Treason, I attach you both.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-mow">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mow.</speaker>
      <l n="2167">Is this proceeding iust, and honorable?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-wes">
      <speaker rend="italic">West.</speaker>
      <l n="2168">Is your Assembly so?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-scr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bish.</speaker>
      <l n="2169">Will you thus breake your faith?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-2h4-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iohn.</speaker>
      <l n="2170">I pawn'd thee none:</l>
      <l n="2171">I promis'd you redresse of these same Grieuances</l>
      <l n="2172">Whereof you did complaine; which, by mine Honor,</l>
      <l n="2173">I will performe, with a most Christian care.</l>
      <l n="2174">But for you (Rebels) looke to taste the due</l>
      <l n="2175">Meet for Rebellion, and such Acts as yours.</l>
      <l n="2176">Most shallowly did you these Armes commence,</l>
      <l n="2177">Fondly brought here, and foolishly sent hence.</l>
      <l n="2178">Strike vp our Drummes, pursue the scattder'd stray,</l>
      <l n="2179">Heauen, and not wee, haue safely fought to day.</l>
      <l n="2180">Some guard these Traitors to the Block of Death,</l>
      <l n="2181">Treasons true Bed, and yeelder vp of breath.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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