The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



Text and Image

Here you can read a digital edition of each play in various views.

Page Image & Text
Digital Text
XML

Reference: χgg8r - Histories, p. [101]

Left Column


EPILOGVE.
[3215]

FIRST, my Feare: then, my Curtsie: last, my Speech.

My Feare, is your Displeasure: My Curtsie, my Dutie:

And my speech, to Begge your Pardons. If you looke for a

good speech now, you vndoe me: For what I haue to say, is

of mine owne making: and what (indeed) I should say, will

[3220]

I (I doubt) prooue mine owne marring. But to the Purpose,

and so to the Venture. Be it knowne to you (as it is very

well) I was lately here in the end of a displeasing Play, to pray your Patience

for it, and to promise you a Better: I did meane (indeede) to pay you with this,

which if (like an ill Venture) it come vnluckily home, I breake; and you, my gen­

[3225]

tle Creditors lose. Heere I promist you I would be, and heere I commit my Bodie

to your Mercies: Bate me some, and I will pay you some, and (as most Debtors do)

promise you infinitely.

If my Tongue cannot entreate you to acquit me: will you command me to vse

my Legges? And yet that were but light payment, to Dance out of your debt: But

[3230]

a good Conscience, will make any possible satisfaction, and so will I. All the Gen­

tle women heere, haue forgiuen me, if the Gentlemen will not, then the Gentlemen

do not agree with the Gentlewomen, which was neuer seene before, in such an As­

sembly.

One word more, I beseech you: if you be not too much cloid with Fat Meate,

[3235]

our humble Author will continue the story (with Sir Iohn in it) and make you

merry, with faire Katherine of France: where (for any thing I know Fal­ staffe shall dye of a sweat, vnlesse already he be kill'd with your hard Opinions:

For Old‑Castle dyed a Martyr, and this is not the man. My Tongue is wearie,

when my Legs are too, I will bid you good night; and so kneele downe before you:

[3240]

But (indeed) to pray for the Queene.

Image


[full image]

Right Column


Download the digital text and images of the play



 
EPILOGVE.
[3215]

FIRST, my Feare: then, my Curtsie: last, my Speech.

My Feare, is your Displeasure: My Curtsie, my Dutie:

And my speech, to Begge your Pardons. If you looke for a

good speech now, you vndoe me: For what I haue to say, is

of mine owne making: and what (indeed) I should say, will

[3220]

I (I doubt) prooue mine owne marring. But to the Purpose,

and so to the Venture. Be it knowne to you (as it is very

well) I was lately here in the end of a displeasing Play, to pray your Patience

for it, and to promise you a Better: I did meane (indeede) to pay you with this,

which if (like an ill Venture) it come vnluckily home, I breake; and you, my gen­

[3225]

tle Creditors lose. Heere I promist you I would be, and heere I commit my Bodie

to your Mercies: Bate me some, and I will pay you some, and (as most Debtors do)

promise you infinitely.

If my Tongue cannot entreate you to acquit me: will you command me to vse

my Legges? And yet that were but light payment, to Dance out of your debt: But

[3230]

a good Conscience, will make any possible satisfaction, and so will I. All the Gen­

tle women heere, haue forgiuen me, if the Gentlemen will not, then the Gentlemen

do not agree with the Gentlewomen, which was neuer seene before, in such an As­

sembly.

One word more, I beseech you: if you be not too much cloid with Fat Meate,

[3235]

our humble Author will continue the story (with Sir Iohn in it) and make you

merry, with faire Katherine of France: where (for any thing I know Fal­ staffe shall dye of a sweat, vnlesse already he be kill'd with your hard Opinions:

For Old‑Castle dyed a Martyr, and this is not the man. My Tongue is wearie,

when my Legs are too, I will bid you good night; and so kneele downe before you:

[3240]

But (indeed) to pray for the Queene.

 

Download the digital text of the play

        
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="epilogue">
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0423-0.jpg"/>
   <head rend="center">EPILOGVE.</head>
   <sp>
      <p rend="italic" n="3215">
         <c rend="decoratedCapital">F</c>IRST, my Feare: then, my Curtsie: last, my Speech.
      <lb n="3216"/>My Feare, is your Displeasure: My Curtsie, my Dutie:
      <lb n="3217"/>And my speech, to Begge your Pardons. If you looke for a
      <lb n="3218"/>good speech now, you vndoe me: For what I haue to say, is
      <lb n="3219"/>of mine owne making: and what (indeed) I should say, will
      <lb n="3220"/>I (I doubt) prooue mine owne marring. But to the Purpose,
      <lb n="3221"/>and so to the Venture. Be it knowne to you (as it is very
      <lb n="3222"/>well) I was lately here in the end of a displeasing Play, to pray your Patience
      <lb n="3223"/>for it, and to promise you a Better: I did meane (indeede) to pay you with this,
      <lb n="3224"/>which if (like an ill Venture) it come vnluckily home, I breake; and you, my gen­
      <lb n="3225"/>tle Creditors lose. Heere I promist you I would be, and heere I commit my Bodie
      <lb n="3226"/>to your Mercies: Bate me some, and I will pay you some, and (as most Debtors do)
      <lb n="3227"/>promise you infinitely.</p>
      <p rend="italic" n="3228">If my Tongue cannot entreate you to acquit me: will you command me to vse
      <lb n="3229"/>my Legges? And yet that were but light payment, to Dance out of your debt: But
      <lb n="3230"/>a good Conscience, will make any possible satisfaction, and so will I. All the Gen­
      <lb n="3231"/>tle women heere, haue forgiuen me, if the Gentlemen will not, then the Gentlemen
      <lb n="3232"/>do not agree with the Gentlewomen, which was neuer seene before, in such an As­
      <lb n="3233"/>sembly.</p>
      <p rend="italic" n="3234">One word more, I beseech you: if you be not too much cloid with Fat Meate,
      <lb n="3235"/>our humble Author will continue the story (with<hi rend="roman">Sir Iohn</hi>in it) and make you
      <lb n="3236"/>merry, with faire<hi rend="roman">Katherine</hi>of<hi rend="roman">France</hi>: where (for any thing I know<hi rend="roman">Fal­
      <lb n="3237"/>staffe</hi>shall dye of a sweat, vnlesse already he be kill'd with your hard Opinions:
      <lb n="3238"/>For<hi rend="roman">Old‑Castle</hi>dyed a Martyr, and this is not the man. My Tongue is wearie,
      <lb n="3239"/>when my Legs are too, I will bid you good night; and so kneele downe before you:
      <lb n="3240"/>But (indeed) to pray for the Queene.</p>
   </sp>
</div>

        
        

Download the XML