The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: K1v - Comedies, p. 110

Left Column


Much adoe about Nothing. To wish him wrastle with affection, And neuer to let Beatrice know of it. Vrsula. Why did you so, doth not the Gentleman
[1100]
Deserue as full as fortunate a bed, As euer Beatrice shall couch vpon?
Hero. O God of loue! I know he doth deserue, As much as may be yeelded to a man: But Nature neuer fram'd a womans heart,
[1105]
Of prowder stuffe then that of Beatrice: Disdaine and Scorne ride sparkling in her eyes, Mis‑prizing what they looke on, and her wit Values it selfe so highly, that to her All matter else seemes weake: she cannot loue,
[1110]
Nor take no shape nor proiect of affection, Shee is so selfe indeared.
Vrsula. Sure I thinke so, And therefore certainely it were not good She knew his loue, lest she make sport at it. Hero.
[1115]
Why you speake truth, I neuer yet saw man, How wise, how noble, yong, how rarely featur'd. But she would spell him backward: if faire fac'd, She would sweare the gentleman should be her sister: If blacke, why Nature drawing of an anticke,
[1120]
Made a foule blot: if tall, a launce ill headed: If low, an agot very vildlie cut: If speaking, why a vane blowne with all windes: If silent, why a blocke moued with none. So turnes she euery man the wrong side out,
[1125]
And neuer giues to Truth and Vertue, that Which simplenesse and merit purchaseth.
Vrsu. Sure, sure, such carping is not commendable. Hero. No, not to be so odde, and from all fashions, As Beatrice is, cannot be commendable,
[1130]
But who dare tell her so? if I should speake, She would mocke me into ayre, O she would laugh me Out of my selfe, presse me to death with wit, Therefore let Benedicke like couered fire, Consume away in sighes, waste inwardly:
[1135]
It were a better death, to die with mockes, Which is as bad as die with tickling.
Vrsu. Yet tell her of it, heare what shee will say. Hero. No, rather I will goe to Benedicke, And counsaile him to fight against his passion,
[1140]
And truly Ile deuise some honest slanders, To staine my cosin with, one doth not know, How much an ill word may impoison liking.
Vrsu. O doe not doe your cosin such a wrong, She cannot be so much without true iudgement,
[1145]
Hauing so swift and excellent a wit As she is prisde to haue, as to refuse So rare a Gentleman as signior Benedicke.
Hero. He is the onely man of Italy, Alwaies excepted, my deare Claudio. Vrsu.
[1150]
I pray you be not angry with me, Madame, Speaking my fancy: Signior Benedicke, For shape, for bearing argument and valour, Goes formost in report through Italy.
Hero. Indeed he hath an excellent good name. Vrsu.
[1155]
His excellence did earne it ere he had it: When are you married Madame?
Hero. Why euerie day to morrow, come goe in, Ile shew thee some attires, and haue thy counsell, Which is the best to furnish me to morrow. Vrsu.
[1160]
Shee's tane I warrant you, We haue caught her Madame?
Hero. If it proue so, then louing goes by haps,

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[full image]

Right Column


Some Cupid kills with arrowes, some with traps. Exit. Beat. What fire is in mine eares? can this be true?
[1165]
Stand I condemn'd for pride and scorne so much? Contempt, farewell, and maiden pride, adew, No glory liues behinde the backe of such. And Benedicke, loue on, I will requite thee, Taming my wilde heart to thy louing hand:
[1170]
If thou dost loue, my kindnesse shall incite thee To binde our loues vp in a holy band. For others say thou dost deserue, and I Beleeue it better then reportingly.
Exit.
[Act 3, Scene 2] Enter Prince, Claudio, Benedicke, and Leonato. Prince.

I doe but stay till your marriage be consum­

[1175]

mate, and then go I toward Arragon.

Clau.

Ile bring you thither my Lord, if you'l vouch­

safe me.

Prin.

Nay, that would be as great a soyle in the new

glosse of your marriage, as to shew a childe his new coat

[1180]

and forbid him to weare it, I will onely bee bold with

Benedicke for his companie, for from the crowne of his

head, to the sole of his foot, he is all mirth, he hath twice

or thrice cut Cupids bow‑string, and the little hang‑man

dare not shoot at him, he hath a heart as sound as a bell,

[1185]

and his tongue is the clapper, for what his heart thinkes,

his tongue speakes.

Bene.

Gallants, I am not as I haue bin.

Leo.

So say I, methinkes you are sadder.

Claud.

I hope he be in loue.

Prin.
[1190]

Hang him truant, there's no true drop of bloud

in him to be truly toucht with loue, if he be sad, he wants

money.

Bene.

I haue the tooth‑ach.

Prin.

Draw it.

Bene.
[1195]

Hang it.

Claud.

You must hang it first, and draw it afterwards.

Prin.

What? sigh for the tooth‑ach.

Leon.

Where is but a humour or a worme.

Bene.

Well, euery one cannot master a griefe, but hee

[1200]

that has it.

Clau.

Yet say I, he is in loue.

Prin.

There is no appearance of fancie in him, vnlesse

it be a fancy that he hath to strange disguises, as to bee a

Dutchman to day, a Frenchman to morrow: vnlesse hee

[1205]

haue a fancy to this foolery, as it appeares hee hath, hee

is no foole for fancy, as you would haue it to appeare

he is.

Clau.

If he be not in loue vvith with some vvoman woman , there

is no beleeuing old signes, a brushes his hat a mornings,

[1210]

What should that bode?

Prin.

Hath any man seene him at the Barbers?

Clau.

No, but the Barbers man hath beene seen with

him, and the olde ornament of his cheeke hath already

stuft tennis balls.

Leon.
[1215]

Indeed he lookes yonger than hee did, by the

losse of a beard.

Prin.

Nay a rubs himselfe vvith with Ciuit, can you smell

him out by that?

Clau.

That's as much as to say, the sweet youth's in

[1220]

loue.

Prin.

The greatest note of it is his melancholy.

Clau.

And vvhen when vvas was he vvont wont to vvash wash his face ?

Prin.

Yea, or to paint himselfe? for the which I heare

vvhat what they say of him.

Clau.
[1225]

Nay, but his iesting spirit, vvhich which is now crept

into a lute‑string, and now gouern'd by stops.

Prince.

Download the digital text and images of the play



 
[Act 3, Scene 2] Enter Prince, Claudio, Benedicke, and Leonato. Prince.

I doe but stay till your marriage be consum­

[1175]

mate, and then go I toward Arragon.

Clau.

Ile bring you thither my Lord, if you'l vouch­

safe me.

Prin.

Nay, that would be as great a soyle in the new

glosse of your marriage, as to shew a childe his new coat

[1180]

and forbid him to weare it, I will onely bee bold with

Benedicke for his companie, for from the crowne of his

head, to the sole of his foot, he is all mirth, he hath twice

or thrice cut Cupids bow‑string, and the little hang‑man

dare not shoot at him, he hath a heart as sound as a bell,

[1185]

and his tongue is the clapper, for what his heart thinkes,

his tongue speakes.

Bene.

Gallants, I am not as I haue bin.

Leo.

So say I, methinkes you are sadder.

Claud.

I hope he be in loue.

Prin.
[1190]

Hang him truant, there's no true drop of bloud

in him to be truly toucht with loue, if he be sad, he wants

money.

Bene.

I haue the tooth‑ach.

Prin.

Draw it.

Bene.
[1195]

Hang it.

Claud.

You must hang it first, and draw it afterwards.

Prin.

What? sigh for the tooth‑ach.

Leon.

Where is but a humour or a worme.

Bene.

Well, euery one cannot master a griefe, but hee

[1200]

that has it.

Clau.

Yet say I, he is in loue.

Prin.

There is no appearance of fancie in him, vnlesse

it be a fancy that he hath to strange disguises, as to bee a

Dutchman to day, a Frenchman to morrow: vnlesse hee

[1205]

haue a fancy to this foolery, as it appeares hee hath, hee

is no foole for fancy, as you would haue it to appeare

he is.

Clau.

If he be not in loue vvith with some vvoman woman , there

is no beleeuing old signes, a brushes his hat a mornings,

[1210]

What should that bode?

Prin.

Hath any man seene him at the Barbers?

Clau.

No, but the Barbers man hath beene seen with

him, and the olde ornament of his cheeke hath already

stuft tennis balls.

Leon.
[1215]

Indeed he lookes yonger than hee did, by the

losse of a beard.

Prin.

Nay a rubs himselfe vvith with Ciuit, can you smell

him out by that?

Clau.

That's as much as to say, the sweet youth's in

[1220]

loue.

Prin.

The greatest note of it is his melancholy.

Clau.

And vvhen when vvas was he vvont wont to vvash wash his face ?

Prin.

Yea, or to paint himselfe? for the which I heare

vvhat what they say of him.

Clau.
[1225]

Nay, but his iesting spirit, vvhich which is now crept

into a lute‑string, and now gouern'd by stops.

Prin.

Indeed that tels a heauy tale for him: conclude,

he is in loue.

Clau.

Nay, but I know who loues him.

Prince.
[1230]

That would I know too, I warrant one that

knowes him not.

Cla.

Yes, and his ill conditions, and in despight of all,

dies for him.

Prin.

Shee shall be buried with her face vpwards.

Bene.
[1235]

Yet is this no charme for the tooth‑ake, old sig­

nior, walke aside with mee, I haue studied eight or nine

wise words to speake to you, which these hobby‑horses

must not heare.

Prin.

For my life to breake with him about Beatrice.

Clau.
[1240]

'Tis euen so, Hero and Margaret haue by this

played their parts with Beatrice, and then the two Beares

will not bite one another when they meete.

Enter Iohn the Bastard. Bast.

My Lord and brother, God saue you.

Prin.

Good den brother.

Bast.
[1245]

If your leisure seru'd, I would speake with you.

Prince.

In priuate ?

Bast.

If it please you, yet Count Claudio may heare,

for what I would speake of, concernes him.

Prin.

What's the matter?

Basta.
[1250]

Meanes your Lordship to be married to mor­

row?

Prin.

You know he does.

Bast.

I know not that when he knowes what I know.

Clau.

If there be any impediment, I pray you disco­

[1255]

uer it.

Bast.

You may thinke I loue you not, let that appeare

hereafter, and ayme better at me by that I now will ma­

nifest, for my brother (I thinke, he holds you well, and in

dearenesse of heart) hath holpe to effect your ensuing

[1260]

marriage: surely sute ill spent, and labour ill bestowed.

Prin.

Why, what's the matter?

Bastard.

I came hither to tell you, and circumstances

shortned, (for she hath beene too long a talking of) the

Lady is disloyall.

Clau.
[1265]

Who Hero?

Bast.

Euen shee, Leonatoes Hero, your Hero, euery

mans Hero.

Clau.

Disloyall?

Bast.

The word is too good to paint out her wicked­

[1270]

nesse, I could say she were worse, thinke you of a worse

title, and I will fit her to it: wonder not till further war­

rant: goe but with mee to night, you shal see her cham­

ber window entred, euen the night before her wedding

day, if you loue her, then to morrow wed her: But it

[1275]

would better fit your honour to change your minde.

Claud.

May this be so?

Princ.

I will not thinke it.

Bast.

If you dare not trust that you see, confesse not

that you know: if you will follow mee, I will shew you

[1280]

enough, and when you haue seene more, & heard more,

proceed accordingly.

Clau.

If I see any thing to night, why I should not

marry her to morrow in the congregation, where I shold

wedde, there will I shame her.

Prin.
[1285]

And as I wooed for thee to obtaine her, I will

ioyne with thee to disgrace her.

Bast.

I will disparage her no farther, till you are my

witnesses, beare it coldly but till night, and let the issue

shew it selfe.

Prin.
[1290]

O day vntowardly turned!

Claud.

O mischiefe strangelie thwarting!

Bastard.

O plague right well preuented! so will you

say, when you haue seene the sequele.

Exit.
 

Download the digital text of the play

        
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="2" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 2]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Prince, Claudio, Benedicke, and Leonato.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prince.</speaker>
      <p n="1174">I doe but stay till your marriage be consum­
      <lb n="1175"/>mate, and then go I toward Arragon.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1176">Ile bring you thither my Lord, if you'l vouch­
      <lb n="1177"/>safe me.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1178">Nay, that would be as great a soyle in the new
      <lb n="1179"/>glosse of your marriage, as to shew a childe his new coat
      <lb n="1180"/>and forbid him to weare it, I will onely bee bold with
      <lb n="1181"/>
         <hi rend="italic">Benedicke</hi>for his companie, for from the crowne of his
      <lb n="1182"/>head, to the sole of his foot, he is all mirth, he hath twice
      <lb n="1183"/>or thrice cut Cupids bow‑string, and the little hang‑man
      <lb n="1184"/>dare not shoot at him, he hath a heart as sound as a bell,
      <lb n="1185"/>and his tongue is the clapper, for what his heart thinkes,
      <lb n="1186"/>his tongue speakes.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ben">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bene.</speaker>
      <p n="1187">Gallants, I am not as I haue bin.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <p n="1188">So say I, methinkes you are sadder.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Claud.</speaker>
      <p n="1189">I hope he be in loue.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1190">Hang him truant, there's no true drop of bloud
      <lb n="1191"/>in him to be truly toucht with loue, if he be sad, he wants
      <lb n="1192"/>money.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ben">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bene.</speaker>
      <p n="1193">I haue the tooth‑ach.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1194">Draw it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ben">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bene.</speaker>
      <p n="1195">Hang it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Claud.</speaker>
      <p n="1196">You must hang it first, and draw it afterwards.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1197">What? sigh for the tooth‑ach.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leon.</speaker>
      <p n="1198">Where is but a humour or a worme.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ben">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bene.</speaker>
      <p n="1199">Well, euery one cannot master a griefe, but hee
      <lb n="1200"/>that has it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1201">Yet say I, he is in loue.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1202">There is no appearance of fancie in him, vnlesse
      <lb n="1203"/>it be a fancy that he hath to strange disguises, as to bee a
      <lb n="1204"/>Dutchman to day, a Frenchman to morrow: vnlesse hee
      <lb n="1205"/>haue a fancy to this foolery, as it appeares hee hath, hee
      <lb n="1206"/>is no foole for fancy, as you would haue it to appeare
      <lb n="1207"/>he is.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1208">If he be not in loue<choice>
            <orig>vvith</orig>
            <corr>with</corr>
         </choice>some<choice>
            <orig>vvoman</orig>
            <corr>woman</corr>
         </choice>, there
      <lb n="1209"/>is no beleeuing old signes, a brushes his hat a mornings,
      <lb n="1210"/>What should that bode?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1211">Hath any man seene him at the Barbers?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1212">No, but the Barbers man hath beene seen with
      <lb n="1213"/>him, and the olde ornament of his cheeke hath already
      <lb n="1214"/>stuft tennis balls.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leon.</speaker>
      <p n="1215">Indeed he lookes yonger than hee did, by the
      <lb n="1216"/>losse of a beard.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1217">Nay a rubs himselfe<choice>
            <orig>vvith</orig>
            <corr>with</corr>
         </choice>Ciuit, can you smell
      <lb n="1218"/>him out by that?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1219">That's as much as to say, the sweet youth's in
      <lb n="1220"/>loue.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1221">The greatest note of it is his melancholy.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1222">And<choice>
            <orig>vvhen</orig>
            <corr>when</corr>
         </choice>
         <choice>
            <orig>vvas</orig>
            <corr>was</corr>
         </choice>he<choice>
            <orig>vvont</orig>
            <corr>wont</corr>
         </choice>to<choice>
            <orig>vvash</orig>
            <corr>wash</corr>
         </choice>his face<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1223">Yea, or to paint himselfe? for the which I heare
      <lb n="1224"/>
         <choice>
            <orig>vvhat</orig>
            <corr>what</corr>
         </choice>they say of him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1225">Nay, but his iesting spirit,<choice>
            <orig>vvhich</orig>
            <corr>which</corr>
         </choice>is now crept
      <lb n="1226"/>into a lute‑string, and now gouern'd by stops.</p>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0131-0.jpg" n="111"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1227">Indeed that tels a heauy tale for him: conclude,
      <lb n="1228"/>he is in loue.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1229">Nay, but I know who loues him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prince.</speaker>
      <p n="1230">That would I know too, I warrant one that
      <lb n="1231"/>knowes him not.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cla.</speaker>
      <p n="1232">Yes, and his ill conditions, and in despight of all,
      <lb n="1233"/>dies for him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1234">Shee shall be buried with her face vpwards.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ben">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bene.</speaker>
      <p n="1235">Yet is this no charme for the tooth‑ake, old sig­
      <lb n="1236"/>nior, walke aside with mee, I haue studied eight or nine
      <lb n="1237"/>wise words to speake to you, which these hobby‑horses
      <lb n="1238"/>must not heare.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1239">For my life to breake with him about<hi rend="italic">Beatrice</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1240">'Tis euen so,<hi rend="italic">Hero</hi>and<hi rend="italic">Margaret</hi>haue by this
      <lb n="1241"/>played their parts with<hi rend="italic">Beatrice</hi>, and then the two Beares
      <lb n="1242"/>will not bite one another when they meete.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Iohn the Bastard.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1243">My Lord and brother, God saue you.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1244">Good den brother.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1245">If your leisure seru'd, I would speake with you.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prince.</speaker>
      <p n="1246">In priuate<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1247">If it please you, yet Count<hi rend="italic">Claudio</hi>may heare,
      <lb n="1248"/>for what I would speake of, concernes him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1249">What's the matter?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Basta.</speaker>
      <p n="1250">Meanes your Lordship to be married to mor­
      <lb n="1251"/>row?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1252">You know he does.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1253">I know not that when he knowes what I know.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1254">If there be any impediment, I pray you disco­
      <lb n="1255"/>uer it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1256">You may thinke I loue you not, let that appeare
      <lb n="1257"/>hereafter, and ayme better at me by that I now will ma­
      <lb n="1258"/>nifest, for my brother (I thinke, he holds you well, and in
      <lb n="1259"/>dearenesse of heart) hath holpe to effect your ensuing
      <lb n="1260"/>marriage: surely sute ill spent, and labour ill bestowed.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1261">Why, what's the matter?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bastard.</speaker>
      <p n="1262">I came hither to tell you, and circumstances
      <lb n="1263"/>shortned, (for she hath beene too long a talking of) the
      <lb n="1264"/>Lady is disloyall.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1265">Who<hi rend="italic">Hero</hi>?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1266">Euen shee,<hi rend="italic">Leonatoes Hero</hi>, your<hi rend="italic">Hero</hi>, euery
      <lb n="1267"/>mans<hi rend="italic">Hero</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1268">Disloyall?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1269">The word is too good to paint out her wicked­
      <lb n="1270"/>nesse, I could say she were worse, thinke you of a worse
      <lb n="1271"/>title, and I will fit her to it: wonder not till further war­
      <lb n="1272"/>rant: goe but with mee to night, you shal see her cham­
      <lb n="1273"/>ber window entred, euen the night before her wedding
      <lb n="1274"/>day, if you loue her, then to morrow wed her: But it
      <lb n="1275"/>would better fit your honour to change your minde.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Claud.</speaker>
      <p n="1276">May this be so?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Princ.</speaker>
      <p n="1277">I will not thinke it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1278">If you dare not trust that you see, confesse not
      <lb n="1279"/>that you know: if you will follow mee, I will shew you
      <lb n="1280"/>enough, and when you haue seene more, &amp; heard more,
      <lb n="1281"/>proceed accordingly.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clau.</speaker>
      <p n="1282">If I see any thing to night, why I should not
      <lb n="1283"/>marry her to morrow in the congregation, where I shold
      <lb n="1284"/>wedde, there will I shame her.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1285">And as I wooed for thee to obtaine her, I will
      <lb n="1286"/>ioyne with thee to disgrace her.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="1287">I will disparage her no farther, till you are my
      <lb n="1288"/>witnesses, beare it coldly but till night, and let the issue
      <lb n="1289"/>shew it selfe.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-ped">
      <speaker rend="italic">Prin.</speaker>
      <p n="1290">O day vntowardly turned!</p>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-ado-cla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Claud.</speaker>
      <p n="1291">O mischiefe strangelie thwarting!</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ado-joh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bastard.</speaker>
      <p n="1292">O plague right well preuented! so will you
      <lb n="1293"/>say, when you haue seene the sequele.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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