The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: V2v - Comedies, p. 232

Left Column


All's Well that Ends Well.

Get thee a good husband, and vse him as he vses thee:

[215]

So farewell.

Hel. Our remedies oft in our selues do lye, Which we ascribe to heauen: the fated skye Giues vs free scope, onely doth backward pull Our slow designes, when we our selues are dull.
[220]
What power is it, which mounts my loue so hye, That makes me see, and cannot feede mine eye? The mightiest space in fortune, Nature brings To ioyne like, likes; and kisse like natiue things. Impossible be strange attempts to those
[225]
That weigh their paines in sence, and do suppose What hath beene, cannot be. Who euer stroue To shew her merit, that did misse her loue? (The Kings disease) my proiect may deceiue me, But my intents are fixt, and will not leaue me.
Exit
[Act 1, Scene 2] Flourish Cornets. Enter the King of France with Letters, and diuers Attendants. King.
[230]
The Florentines and Senoys are by th' eares, Haue fought with equall fortune, and continue A brauing warre.
1. Lo. G. So tis reported sir. King. Nay tis most credible, we heere receiue it,
[235]
A certaintie vouch'd from our Cosin Austria, With caution, that the Florentine will moue vs For speedie ayde: wherein our deerest friend Preiudicates the businesse, and would seeme To haue vs make deniall.
1. Lo. G.
[240]
His loue and wisedome Approu'd so to your Maiesty, may pleade For amplest credence.
King. He hath arm'd our answer, And Florence is deni'de before he comes:
[245]
Yet for our Gentlemen that meane to see The Tuscan seruice, freely haue they leaue To stand on either part.
2. Lo. E. It well may serue A nursserie to our Gentrie, who are sicke
[250]
For breathing, and exploit.
King. What's he comes heere. Enter Bertram, Lafew, and Parolles. 1. Lor. G.

It is the Count Rosignoll my good Lord,

Yong Bertram.

King. Youth, thou bear'st thy Fathers face,
[255]
Franke Nature rather curious then in hast Hath well compos'd thee: Thy Fathers morall parts Maist thou inherit too: Welcome to Paris.
Ber. My thankes and dutie are your Maiesties. Kin. I would I had that corporall soundnesse now,
[260]
As when thy father, and my selfe, in friendship First tride our souldiership: he did looke farre Into the seruice of the time, and was Discipled of the brauest. He lasted long, But on vs both did haggish Age steale on,
[265]
And wore vs out of act: It much repaires me To talke of your good father; in his youth He had the wit, which I can well obserue To day in our yong Lords: but they may iest Till their owne scorne returne to them vnnoted
[270]
Ere they can hide their leuitie in honour: So like a Courtier, contempt nor bitternesse

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Right Column


Were in his pride, or sharpnesse; if they were, His equall had awak'd them, and his honour Clocke to it selfe, knew the true minute when
[275]
Exception bid him speake: and at this time His tongue obey'd his hand. Who were below him, He vs'd as creatures of another place, A nd bow'd his eminent top to their low rankes, Making them proud of his humilitie,
[280]
In their poore praise he humbled: Such a man Might be a copie to these yonger times; Which followed well, would demonstrate them now But goers backward.
Ber. His good remembrance sir
[285]
Lies richer in your thoughts, then on his tombe: So in approofe liues not his Epitaph, As in your royall speech.
King. Would I were with him he would alwaies say, (Me thinkes I heare him now) his plausiue words
[290]
He scatter'd not in eares, but grafted them To grow there and to beare: Let me not liue, This his good melancholly oft began On the Catastrophe and heele of pastime When it was out: Let me not liue (quoth hee)
[295]
After my flame lackes oyle, to be the snuffe Of yonger spirits, whose apprehensiue senses All but new things disdaine; whose iudgements are Meere fathers of their garments: whose constancies Expire before their fashions: this he wish'd.
[300]
I after him, do after him wish too: Since I nor wax nor honie can bring home, I quickly were dissolued from my hiue To giue some Labourers roome.
L.2.E. You'r loued Sir,
[305]
They that least lend it you, shall lacke you first.
Kin. I fill a place I know't: how long ist Count Since the Physitian at your fathers died? He was much fam'd. Ber. Some six moneths since my Lord. Kin.
[310]
If he were liuing, I would try him yet. Lend me an arme: the rest haue worne me out With seuerall applications: Nature and sicknesse Debate it at their leisure. Welcome Count, My sonne's no deerer.
Ber.
[315]
Thanke your Maiesty.
Exit
[Act 1, Scene 3] Flourish. Enter Countesse, Steward, and Clowne. Coun.

I will now heare, what say you of this gentle­

woman.

Ste.

Maddam the care I haue had to euen your con­

tent, I wish might be found in the Kalender of my past

[320]

endeuours, for then we wound our Modestie, and make

foule the clearnesse of our deseruings, whenof our selues

we publish them.

Coun.

What doe's this knaue heere? Get you gone

sirra: the complaints I haue heard of you I do not all be­

[325]

leeue, 'tis my slownesse that I doe not: For I know you

lacke not folly to commit them, & haue abilitie enough

to make such knaueries yours.

Clo.

'Tis not vnknown to you Madam, I am a poore

fellow.

Coun.
[330]

Well sir.

Clo.

No maddam,

'Tis not so well that I am poore, though manie of

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[Act 1, Scene 3] Flourish. Enter Countesse, Steward, and Clowne. Coun.

I will now heare, what say you of this gentle­

woman.

Ste.

Maddam the care I haue had to euen your con­

tent, I wish might be found in the Kalender of my past

[320]

endeuours, for then we wound our Modestie, and make

foule the clearnesse of our deseruings, whenof our selues

we publish them.

Coun.

What doe's this knaue heere? Get you gone

sirra: the complaints I haue heard of you I do not all be­

[325]

leeue, 'tis my slownesse that I doe not: For I know you

lacke not folly to commit them, & haue abilitie enough

to make such knaueries yours.

Clo.

'Tis not vnknown to you Madam, I am a poore

fellow.

Coun.
[330]

Well sir.

Clo.

No maddam,

'Tis not so well that I am poore, though manie f the rich are damn'd, but if I may haue your Ladiships

ood will to goe to the world, Isbell the w

ill doe as we may.

Coun.
[335]

Wilt thou needes be a begger?

Clo.

I doe beg your good will in this case.

Cou.

In what case?

Clo.

In Isbels case and mine owne: seruice is no heri

ge,

[340]

and I thinke I shall neuer haue the blessing of God,

ll I haue issue a my bodie: for they say barnes are bles

ngs

Cou.

Tell me thy reason why thou wilt marrie?

Clo.

My poore bodie Madam requires it, I am driuen

[345]

n by the flesh, and hee must needes goe that the diuell

riues.

Cou.

Is this all your worships reason?

Clo.

Faith Madam I haue other holie reasons, such as

ey are.

Cou.
[350]

May the world know them?

Clo.

I haue beene Madam a wicked creature, as you

nd all flesh and blood are, and indeede I doe marrie that

may repent.

Cou.

Thy marriage sooner then thy wickednesse.

Clo.
[355]

I am out a friends Madam, and I hope to haue

riends for my wiues sake.

Cou.

Such friends are thine enemies knaue.

Clo.

Y'are shallow Madam in great friends, for the

naues come to doe that for me which I am a wearie of:

[360]

e that eres my Land, spares my teame, and giues mee

eaue to Inne the crop: if I be his cuckold hee's my

rudge; he that comforts my wife, is the cherisher of

y flesh and blood; hee that cherishes my flesh and

lood, loues my flesh and blood; he that loues my flesh

[365]

nd blood is my friend: ergo, he that kisses my wife is my

riend: if men could be contented to be what they are,

here were no feare in marriage, for yong Charbon the

Puritan, and old Poysam the Papist, how somere their

earts are seuer'd in Religion, their heads are both one,

[370]

hey may ioule horns together like any Deare i'th Herd.

Cou.

Wilt thou euer be a foule mouth'd and calum

ious knaue?

Clo.

A Prophet I Madam, and I speake the truth the

ext waie, for I the Ballad will repeate, which men full

[375]

rue shall finde, your marriage comes by destinie, your

Cuckow sings by kinde.

Cou.

Get you gone sir, Ile talke with you more anon.

Stew.

May it please you Madam, that hee bid Hellen

ome to you, of her I am to speake.

Cou.
[380]

Sirra tell my gentlewoman I would speake with

er, Hellen I meane.

Clo. Was this faire face the cause, quoth she, Why the Grecians sacked Troy, Fond done, done, fond was this King Priams ioy,
[385]
With that she sighed as she stood, bis

And gaue this sentence then, among nine bad if one be

good, among nine bad if one be good, there's yet one

good in ten.

Cou.

What, one good in tenne? you corrupt the song

[390]

irra.

Clo.

One good woman in ten Madam, which is a pu­

rifying ath' song: would God would serue the world so

all the yeere, weed finde no fault with the tithe woman

if I were the Parson, one in ten quoth a? and wee might

[395]

haue a good woman borne but ore euerie blazing starre,

or at an earthquake, 'twould mend the Lotterie well, a

man may draw his heart out ere a plucke one.

Cou.

Youle begone sir knaue, and doe as I command

you?

Clo.
[400]

That man should be at womans command, and

yet no hurt done, though honestie be no Puritan, yet

it will doe no hurt, it will weare the Surplis of humilitie

ouer the blacke‑Gowne of a bigge heart: I am go­

ing forsooth, the businesse is for Helen to come hither.

Exit. Cou.
[405]

Well now.

Stew.

I know Madam you loue your Gentlewoman

intirely.

Cou.

Faith I doe: her Father bequeath'd her to mee,

and she her selfe without other aduantage, may lawful­

[410]

lie make title to as much loue as shee findes, there is

more owing her then is paid, and more shall be paid

her then sheele demand.

Stew.

Madam, I was verie late more neere her then

I thinke shee wisht mee, alone shee was, and did

[415]

communicate to her selfe her owne words to her

owne eares, shee thought, I dare vowe for her, they

toucht not anie stranger sence, her matter was, shee

loued your Sonne; Fortune shee said was no god­

desse, that had put such difference betwixt their two

[420]

estates: Loue no god, that would not extend his might

onelie, where qualities were leuell, Queene of Vir­

gins, that would suffer her poore Knight surpris'd

without rescue in the first assault or ransome after­

ward: This shee deliuer'd in the most bitter touch of

[425]

sorrow that ere I heard Virgin exclaime in, which I held

my dutie speedily to acquaint you withall, sithence in

the losse that may happen, it concernes you something

to know it.

Cou.

You haue discharg'd this honestlie, keepe it

[430]

to your selfe, manie likelihoods inform'd mee of this

before, which hung so tottring in the ballance, that

I could neither beleeue nor misdoubt: praie you

leaue mee, stall this in your bosome, and I thanke

you for your honest care: I will speake with you fur­

[435]

ther anon.

Exit Steward. Enter Hellen. Old. Cou. Euen so it vvas with me when I was yong: If euer vve are natures, these are ours, this thorne Doth to our Rose of youth rightlie belong Our bloud to vs, this to our blood is borne,
[440]
It is the show, and seale of natures truth, Where loues strong passion is imprest in youth, By our remembrances of daies forgon, Such were our faults, or then we thought them none, Her eie is sicke on't, I obserue her now.
Hell.
[445]

What is your pleasure Madam?

Ol. Cou.

You know Hellen I am a mother to you.

Hell.

Mine honorable Mistris.

Ol. Cou. Nay a mother, why not a mother? when I sed a mother Me thought you saw a serpent, what's in mother,
[450]
That you start at it? I say I am your mother, And put you in the Catalogue of those That were enwombed mine, 'tis often seene Adoption striues with nature, and choise breedes A natiue slip to vs from forraine seedes:
[455]
You nere opprest me with a mothers groane, Yet I expresse to you a mothers care, (Gods mercie maiden) dos it curd thy blood To say I am thy mother? vvhat's the matter, That this distempered messenger of wet?
[460]
The manie colour'd Iris rounds thine eye? ⸺Why, that you are my daughter?
Hell.

That I am not.

Old. Cou.

I say I am your Mother.

Hell. Pardon Madam.
[465]
The Count Rosillion cannot be my brother: I am from humble, he from honored name: No note vpon my Parents, his all noble, My Master, my deere Lord he is, and I His seruant liue, and will his vassall die:
[470]
He must not be my brother.
Ol. Cou.

Nor I your Mother.

Hell. You are my mother Madam, would you were So that my Lord your sonne were not my brother, Indeede my mother, or were you both our mothers,
[475]
I care no more for, then I doe for heauen, So I were not his sister, cant no other, But I your daughter, he must be my brother.
Old. Cou. Yes Hellen, you might be my daughter in law, God shield you meane it not, daughter and mother
[480]
So striue vpon your pulse; vvhat pale agen? My feare hath catcht your fondnesse! now I see The mistrie of your louelinesse, and finde Your salt teares head, now to all sence 'tis grosse: You loue my sonne, inuention is asham'd
[485]
Against the proclamation of thy passion To say thou doost not: therefore tell me true, But tell me then 'tis so, for looke, thy cheekes Confesse it 'ton tooth to th' other, and thine eies See it so grosely showne in thy behauiours,
[490]
That in their kinde they speake it, onely sinne And hellish obstinacie tye thy tongue That truth should be suspected, speake, ist so? If it be so, you haue wound a goodly clewe: If it be not, forsweare't how ere I charge thee,
[495]
As heauen shall worke in me for thine auaile To tell me truelie.
Hell.

Good Madam pardon me.

Cou.

Do you loue my Sonne?

Hell.

Your pardon noble Mistris.

Cou.
[500]

Loue you my Sonne?

Hell.

Doe not you loue him Madam?

Cou. Goe not about; my loue hath in't a bond Whereof the world takes note: Come, come, disclose: The state of your affection, for your passions
[505]
Haue to the full appeach'd.
Hell. Then I confesse Here on my knee, before high heauen and you, That before you, and next vnto high heauen, I loue your Sonne: My friends were poore but honest, so's my loue:
[510]
Be not offended, for it hurts not him That he is lou'd of me; I follow him not By any token of presumptuous suite, Nor would I haue him, till I doe deserue him, Yet neuer know how that desert should be:
[515]
I know I loue in vaine, striue against hope: Yet in this captious, and intemible Siue. I still poure in the waters of my loue And lacke not to loose still; thus Indian like Religious in mine error, I adore
[520]
The Sunne that lookes vpon his worshipper, But knowes of him no more. My deerest Madam, Let not your hate incounter with my loue, For louing where you doe; but if your selfe, Whose aged honor cites a vertuous youth,
[525]
Did euer, in so true a flame of liking, Wish chastly, and loue dearely, that your Dian Was both her selfe and loue, O then giue pittie To her whose state is such, that cannot choose But lend and giue where she is sure to loose;
[530]
That seekes not to finde that, her search implies, But riddle like, liues sweetely where she dies.
Cou. Had you not lately an intent, speake truely, To goe to Paris? Hell.

Madam I had.

Cou.
[535]

Wherefore? tell true.

Hell. I will tell truth, by grace it selfe I sweare: You know my Father left me some prescriptions Of rare and prou'd effects, such as his reading And manifest experience, had collected
[540]
For generall soueraigntie: and that he wil'd me In heedefull'st reseruation to bestow them, As notes, whose faculties inclusiue were, More then they were in note: Amongst the rest, There is a remedie, approu'd, set downe,
[545]
To cure the desperate languishings whereof The King is render'd lost.
Cou.

This was your motiue for Paris, was it, speake?

Hell. My Lord, your sonne, made me to think of this; Else Paris, and the medicine, and the King,
[550]
Had from the conuersation of my thoughts, Happily beene absent then.
Cou. But thinke you Hellen, If you should tender your supposed aide, He would receiue it? He and his Phisitions
[555]
Are of a minde, he, that they cannot helpe him: They, that they cannot helpe, how shall they credit A poore vnlearned Virgin, when the Schooles Embowel'd of their doctrine, haue left off The danger to it selfe.
Hell.
[560]
There's something in't More then my Fathers skill, which was the great'st Of his profession, that his good receipt, Shall for my legacie be sanctified By th'luckiest stars in heauen, and would your honor
[565]
But giue me leaue to trie successe, I'de venture The well lost life of mine, on his Graces cure, By such a day, an houre.
Cou.

Doo'st thou beleeue't?

Hell.

I Madam knowingly.

Cou.
[570]
Why Hellen thou shalt haue my leaue and loue, Meanes and attendants, and my louing greetings To those of mine in Court, Ile staie at home And praie Gods blessing into thy attempt: Begon to morrow, and be sure of this,
[575]
What I can helpe thee to, thou shalt not misse.
Exeunt.
 

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   <head type="supplied">[Act 1, Scene 3]</head>
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              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>e that eres my Land, spares my teame, and giues mee
      <lb n="361"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>eaue to Inne the crop: if I be his cuckold hee's my
      <lb n="362"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>rudge; he that comforts my wife, is the cherisher of
      <lb n="363"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>y flesh and blood; hee that cherishes my flesh and
      <lb n="364"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>lood, loues my flesh and blood; he that loues my flesh
      <lb n="365"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>nd blood is my friend:<hi rend="italic">ergo</hi>, he that kisses my wife is my
      <lb n="366"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>riend: if men could be contented to be what they are,
      <lb n="367"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>here were no feare in marriage, for yong<hi rend="italic">Charbon</hi>the
      <lb n="368"/>Puritan, and old<hi rend="italic">Poysam</hi>the Papist, how somere their
      <lb n="369"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>earts are seuer'd in Religion, their heads are both one,
      <lb n="370"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>hey may ioule horns together like any Deare i'th Herd.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="371">Wilt thou euer be a foule mouth'd and calum
      <lb n="372"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>ious knaue?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-lav">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="373">A Prophet I Madam, and I speake the truth the
      <lb n="374"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>ext waie, for I the Ballad will repeate, which men full
      <lb n="375"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>rue shall finde, your marriage comes by destinie, your
      <lb n="376"/>Cuckow sings by kinde.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="377">Get you gone sir, Ile talke with you more anon.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ste">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <p n="378">May it please you Madam, that hee bid<hi rend="italic">Hellen</hi>
         
      <lb n="379"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>ome to you, of her I am to speake.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="380">Sirra tell my gentlewoman I would speake with
      <lb n="381"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>er,<hi rend="italic">Hellen</hi>I meane.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-lav">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <l n="382">Was this faire face the cause, quoth she,</l>
      <l n="383">Why the Grecians sacked<hi rend="italic">Troy</hi>,</l>
      <l n="384">Fond done, done, fond was this King<hi rend="italic">Priams</hi>ioy,</l>
      <l n="385">With that she sighed as she stood,<hi rend="italic">bis</hi>
      </l>
      <p n="386">And gaue this sentence then, among nine bad if one be
      <lb n="387"/>good, among nine bad if one be good, there's yet one
      <lb n="388"/>good in ten.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="389">What, one good in tenne? you corrupt the song
      <lb n="390"/>
         <gap reason="absent"
              agent="cropped"
              extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              resp="#JS"/>irra.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-lav">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="391">One good woman in ten Madam, which is a pu­
      <lb n="392"/>rifying ath' song: would God would serue the world so
      <lb n="393"/>all the yeere, weed finde no fault with the tithe woman
      <lb n="394"/>if I were the Parson, one in ten quoth a? and wee might
      <lb n="395"/>haue a good woman borne but ore euerie blazing starre,
      <lb n="396"/>or at an earthquake, 'twould mend the Lotterie well, a
      <lb n="397"/>man may draw his heart out ere a plucke one.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="398">Youle begone sir knaue, and doe as I command
      <lb n="399"/>you?</p>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-aww-lav">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="400">That man should be at womans command, and
      <lb n="401"/>yet no hurt done, though honestie be no Puritan, yet
      <lb n="402"/>it will doe no hurt, it will weare the Surplis of humilitie
      <lb n="403"/>ouer the blacke‑Gowne of a bigge heart: I am go­
      <lb n="404"/>ing forsooth, the businesse is for<hi rend="italic">Helen</hi>to come hither.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="405">Well now.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ste">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <p n="406">I know Madam you loue your Gentlewoman
      <lb n="407"/>intirely.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="408">Faith I doe: her Father bequeath'd her to mee,
      <lb n="409"/>and she her selfe without other aduantage, may lawful­
      <lb n="410"/>lie make title to as much loue as shee findes, there is
      <lb n="411"/>more owing her then is paid, and more shall be paid
      <lb n="412"/>her then sheele demand.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ste">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <p n="413">Madam, I was verie late more neere her then
      <lb n="414"/>I thinke shee wisht mee, alone shee was, and did
      <lb n="415"/>communicate to her selfe her owne words to her
      <lb n="416"/>owne eares, shee thought, I dare vowe for her, they
      <lb n="417"/>toucht not anie stranger sence, her matter was, shee
      <lb n="418"/>loued your Sonne; Fortune shee said was no god­
      <lb n="419"/>desse, that had put such difference betwixt their two
      <lb n="420"/>estates: Loue no god, that would not extend his might
      <lb n="421"/>onelie, where qualities were leuell, Queene of Vir­
      <lb n="422"/>gins, that would suffer her poore Knight surpris'd
      <lb n="423"/>without rescue in the first assault or ransome after­
      <lb n="424"/>ward: This shee deliuer'd in the most bitter touch of
      <lb n="425"/>sorrow that ere I heard Virgin exclaime in, which I held
      <lb n="426"/>my dutie speedily to acquaint you withall, sithence in
      <lb n="427"/>the losse that may happen, it concernes you something
      <lb n="428"/>to know it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="429">You haue discharg'd this honestlie, keepe it
      <lb n="430"/>to your selfe, manie likelihoods inform'd mee of this
      <lb n="431"/>before, which hung so tottring in the ballance, that
      <lb n="432"/>I could neither beleeue nor misdoubt: praie you
      <lb n="433"/>leaue mee, stall this in your bosome, and I thanke
      <lb n="434"/>you for your honest care: I will speake with you fur­
      <lb n="435"/>ther anon.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit Steward.</stage>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Hellen.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Old. Cou.</speaker>
      <l n="436">Euen so it vvas with me when I was yong:</l>
      <l n="437">If euer vve are natures, these are ours, this thorne</l>
      <l n="438">Doth to our Rose of youth rightlie belong</l>
      <l n="439">Our bloud to vs, this to our blood is borne,</l>
      <l n="440">It is the show, and seale of natures truth,</l>
      <l n="441">Where loues strong passion is imprest in youth,</l>
      <l n="442">By our remembrances of daies forgon,</l>
      <l n="443">Such were our faults, or then we thought them none,</l>
      <l n="444">Her eie is sicke on't, I obserue her now.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <p n="445">What is your pleasure Madam?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ol. Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="446">You know<hi rend="italic">Hellen</hi>I am a mother to you.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <p n="447">Mine honorable Mistris.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ol. Cou.</speaker>
      <l n="448">Nay a mother, why not a mother? when I
      <lb/>sed a mother</l>
      <l n="449">Me thought you saw a serpent, what's in mother,</l>
      <l n="450">That you start at it? I say I am your mother,</l>
      <l n="451">And put you in the Catalogue of those</l>
      <l n="452">That were enwombed mine, 'tis often seene</l>
      <l n="453">Adoption striues with nature, and choise breedes</l>
      <l n="454">A natiue slip to vs from forraine seedes:</l>
      <l n="455">You nere opprest me with a mothers groane,</l>
      <l n="456">Yet I expresse to you a mothers care,</l>
      <l n="457">(Gods mercie maiden) dos it curd thy blood</l>
      <l n="458">To say I am thy mother? vvhat's the matter,</l>
      <l n="459">That this distempered messenger of wet?</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0254-0.jpg" n="234"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="460">The manie colour'd Iris rounds thine eye?</l>
      <l n="461">⸺Why, that you are my daughter?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <p n="462">That I am not.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Old. Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="463">I say I am your Mother.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <l n="464">Pardon Madam.</l>
      <l n="465">The Count<hi rend="italic">Rosillion</hi>cannot be my brother:</l>
      <l n="466">I am from humble, he from honored name:</l>
      <l n="467">No note vpon my Parents, his all noble,</l>
      <l n="468">My Master, my deere Lord he is, and I</l>
      <l n="469">His seruant liue, and will his vassall die:</l>
      <l n="470">He must not be my brother.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ol. Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="471">Nor I your Mother.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <l n="472">You are my mother Madam, would you were</l>
      <l n="473">So that my Lord your sonne were not my brother,</l>
      <l n="474">Indeede my mother, or were you both our mothers,</l>
      <l n="475">I care no more for, then I doe for heauen,</l>
      <l n="476">So I were not his sister, cant no other,</l>
      <l n="477">But I your daughter, he must be my brother.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Old. Cou.</speaker>
      <l n="478">Yes<hi rend="italic">Hellen</hi>, you might be my daughter in law,</l>
      <l n="479">God shield you meane it not, daughter and mother</l>
      <l n="480">So striue vpon your pulse; vvhat pale agen?</l>
      <l n="481">My feare hath catcht your fondnesse! now I see</l>
      <l n="482">The mistrie of your louelinesse, and finde</l>
      <l n="483">Your salt teares head, now to all sence 'tis grosse:</l>
      <l n="484">You loue my sonne, inuention is asham'd</l>
      <l n="485">Against the proclamation of thy passion</l>
      <l n="486">To say thou doost not: therefore tell me true,</l>
      <l n="487">But tell me then 'tis so, for looke, thy cheekes</l>
      <l n="488">Confesse it 'ton tooth to th' other, and thine eies</l>
      <l n="489">See it so grosely showne in thy behauiours,</l>
      <l n="490">That in their kinde they speake it, onely sinne</l>
      <l n="491">And hellish obstinacie tye thy tongue</l>
      <l n="492">That truth should be suspected, speake, ist so?</l>
      <l n="493">If it be so, you haue wound a goodly clewe:</l>
      <l n="494">If it be not, forsweare't how ere I charge thee,</l>
      <l n="495">As heauen shall worke in me for thine auaile</l>
      <l n="496">To tell me truelie.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <p n="497">Good Madam pardon me.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="498">Do you loue my Sonne?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <p n="499">Your pardon noble Mistris.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="500">Loue you my Sonne?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <p n="501">Doe not you loue him Madam?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <l n="502">Goe not about; my loue hath in't a bond</l>
      <l n="503">Whereof the world takes note: Come, come, disclose:</l>
      <l n="504">The state of your affection, for your passions</l>
      <l n="505">Haue to the full appeach'd.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <l n="506">Then I confesse</l>
      <l n="507">Here on my knee, before high heauen and you,</l>
      <l n="508">That before you, and next vnto high heauen, I loue your
      <lb/>Sonne:</l>
      <l n="509">My friends were poore but honest, so's my loue:</l>
      <l n="510">Be not offended, for it hurts not him</l>
      <l n="511">That he is lou'd of me; I follow him not</l>
      <l n="512">By any token of presumptuous suite,</l>
      <l n="513">Nor would I haue him, till I doe deserue him,</l>
      <l n="514">Yet neuer know how that desert should be:</l>
      <l n="515">I know I loue in vaine, striue against hope:</l>
      <l n="516">Yet in this captious, and intemible Siue.</l>
      <l n="517">I still poure in the waters of my loue</l>
      <l n="518">And lacke not to loose still; thus<hi rend="italic">Indian</hi>like</l>
      <l n="519">Religious in mine error, I adore</l>
      <l n="520">The Sunne that lookes vpon his worshipper,</l>
      <l n="521">But knowes of him no more. My deerest Madam,</l>
      <l n="522">Let not your hate incounter with my loue,</l>
      <l n="523">For louing where you doe; but if your selfe,</l>
      <l n="524">Whose aged honor cites a vertuous youth,</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="525">Did euer, in so true a flame of liking,</l>
      <l n="526">Wish chastly, and loue dearely, that your<hi rend="italic">Dian</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="527">Was both her selfe and loue, O then giue pittie</l>
      <l n="528">To her whose state is such, that cannot choose</l>
      <l n="529">But lend and giue where she is sure to loose;</l>
      <l n="530">That seekes not to finde that, her search implies,</l>
      <l n="531">But riddle like, liues sweetely where she dies.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <l n="532">Had you not lately an intent, speake truely,</l>
      <l n="533">To goe to<hi rend="italic">Paris</hi>?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <p n="534">Madam I had.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="535">Wherefore? tell true.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <l n="536">I will tell truth, by grace it selfe I sweare:</l>
      <l n="537">You know my Father left me some prescriptions</l>
      <l n="538">Of rare and prou'd effects, such as his reading</l>
      <l n="539">And manifest experience, had collected</l>
      <l n="540">For generall soueraigntie: and that he wil'd me</l>
      <l n="541">In heedefull'st reseruation to bestow them,</l>
      <l n="542">As notes, whose faculties inclusiue were,</l>
      <l n="543">More then they were in note: Amongst the rest,</l>
      <l n="544">There is a remedie, approu'd, set downe,</l>
      <l n="545">To cure the desperate languishings whereof</l>
      <l n="546">The King is render'd lost.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="547">This was your motiue for<hi rend="italic">Paris</hi>, was it, speake?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <l n="548">My Lord, your sonne, made me to think of this;</l>
      <l n="549">Else<hi rend="italic">Paris</hi>, and the medicine, and the King,</l>
      <l n="550">Had from the conuersation of my thoughts,</l>
      <l n="551">Happily beene absent then.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <l n="552">But thinke you<hi rend="italic">Hellen</hi>,</l>
      <l n="553">If you should tender your supposed aide,</l>
      <l n="554">He would receiue it? He and his Phisitions</l>
      <l n="555">Are of a minde, he, that they cannot helpe him:</l>
      <l n="556">They, that they cannot helpe, how shall they credit</l>
      <l n="557">A poore vnlearned Virgin, when the Schooles</l>
      <l n="558">Embowel'd of their doctrine, haue left off</l>
      <l n="559">The danger to it selfe.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <l n="560">There's something in't</l>
      <l n="561">More then my Fathers skill, which was the great'st</l>
      <l n="562">Of his profession, that his good receipt,</l>
      <l n="563">Shall for my legacie be sanctified</l>
      <l n="564">By th'luckiest stars in heauen, and would your honor</l>
      <l n="565">But giue me leaue to trie successe, I'de venture</l>
      <l n="566">The well lost life of mine, on his Graces cure,</l>
      <l n="567">By such a day, an houre.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <p n="568">Doo'st thou beleeue't?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-hel">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hell.</speaker>
      <p n="569">I Madam knowingly.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cou">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cou.</speaker>
      <l n="570">Why<hi rend="italic">Hellen</hi>thou shalt haue my leaue and loue,</l>
      <l n="571">Meanes and attendants, and my louing greetings</l>
      <l n="572">To those of mine in Court, Ile staie at home</l>
      <l n="573">And praie Gods blessing into thy attempt:</l>
      <l n="574">Begon to morrow, and be sure of this,</l>
      <l n="575">What I can helpe thee to, thou shalt not misse.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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