The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



Text and Image

Here you can read a digital edition of each play in various views.

Page Image & Text
Digital Text
XML

Reference: X2r - Comedies, p. 243

Left Column


All's Well that Ends Well. Maria.

I know that knaue, hang him, one Parolles,

[1570]

a filthy Officer he is in those suggestions for the young

Earle, beware of them Diana; their promises, entise­

ments, oathes, tokens, and all these engines of lust, are

not the things they go vnder: many a maide hath beene

seduced by them, and the miserie is example, that so

[1575]

terrible shewes in the wracke of maidenߛhood, cannot

for all that disswade succession, but that they are limed

with the twigges that threatens them. I hope I neede

not to aduise you further, but I hope your owne grace

will keepe you where you are, though there were no

[1580]

further danger knowne, but the modestie which is so

lost.

Dia.

You shall not neede to feare me.

Enter Hellen. Wid.

I hope so: looke here comes a pilgrim, I know

she will lye at my house, thither they send one another,

[1585]

Ile question her. God saue you pilgrim, whether are

bound?

Hel. To S. Iaques la grand. Where do the Palmers lodge, I do beseech you? Wid.

At the S. Francis heere beside the Port.

Hel.
[1590]

Is this the way?

A march afarre. Wid. I marrie ist. Harke you, they come this way: If you will tarrie holy Pilgrime But till the troopes come by, I will conduct you where you shall be lodg'd,
[1595]
The rather for I thinke I know your hostesse As ample as my selfe.
Hel.

Is it your selfe?

Wid.

If you shall please so Pilgrime.

Hel.

I thanke you, and will stay vpon your leisure.

Wid.
[1600]

you came I thinke from France?

Hel.

I did so.

Wid. Heere you shall see a Countriman of yours That has done worthy seruice. Hel.

His name I pray you?

Dia.
[1605]

The Count Rossillion: know you such a one?

Hel. But by the eare that heares most nobly of him: His face I know not. Dia. What somere he is He's brauely taken heere. He stole from France
[1610]
As 'tis reported: for the King had married him Against his liking. Thinke you it is so?
Hel.

I surely meere the truth, I know his Lady.

Dia. There is a Gentleman that serues the Count, Reports but coursely of her. Hel.
[1615]

What's his name?

Dia.

Monsieur Parrolles.

Hel. Oh I beleeue with him, In argument of praise, or to the worth Of the great Count himselfe, she is too meane
[1620]
To haue her name repeated, all her deseruing Is a reserued honestie, and that I haue not heard examin'd.
Dian. Alas poore Ladie, 'Tis a hard bondage to become the wife
[1625]
Of a detesting Lord.
Wid. I write good creature, wheresoere she is, Her hart waighes sadly: this yong maid might do her A shrewd turne if she pleas'd. Hel. How do you meane?
[1630]
May be the amorous Count solicites her In the vnlawfull purpose.
Wid. He does indeede, And brokes with all that can in such a suite

Image


[full image]

Right Column


Corrupt the tender honour of a Maide:
[1635]
But she is arm'd for him, and keepes her guard In honestest defence.
Drumme and Colours. Enter Count Rossillion, Parrolles, and the whole Armie. Mar.

The goddes forbid else.

Wid. So, now they come: That is Anthonio the Dukes eldest sonne,
[1640]
That Escalus.
Hel.

Which is the Frenchman?

Dia. Hee, That with the plume, 'tis a most gallant fellow, I would he lou'd his wife: if he were honester
[1645]
He were much goodlier. Is't not a handsom Gentleman
Hel.

I like him well.

Di. 'Tis pitty he is not honest: yonds that same knaue That leades him to these places: were I his Ladie, I would poison that vile Rascall. Hel.
[1650]

Which is he?

Dia.

That Iacke an‑apes with scarfes. Why is hee

melancholly?

Hel.

Perchance he's hurt i'th battaile.

Par.

Loose our drum? Well.

Mar.
[1655]

He's shrewdly vext at something. Looke he

has spyed vs.

Wid.

Marrie hang you.

Mar.

And your curtesie, for a ring‑carrier.

Exit. Wid.

The troope is past: Come pilgrim, I wil bring

[1660]

you, Where you shall host: Of inioyn'd penitents

There's foure or fiue, to great S. Iaques bound,

Alreadie at my house.

Hel. I humbly thanke you: Please it this Matron, and this gentle Maide
[1665]
To eate with vs to night, the charge and thanking Shall be for me, and to requite you further, I will bestow some precepts of this Virgin, Worthy the note.
Both.

Wee'l take your offer kindly.

Exeunt.
[Act 3, Scene 6] Enter Count Rossillion and the Frenchmen, as at first. Cap. E.
[1670]

Nay good my Lord put him too't: let him

haue his way.

Cap. G.

If your Lordshippe finde him not a Hilding,

hold me no more in your respect.

Cap. E.

On my life my Lord a bubble.

Ber.
[1675]

Do you thinke I am so farre

Deceiued in him.

Cap. E.

Beleeue it my Lord, in mine owne direct

knowledge, without any malice, but to speake of him

as my kinsman, hee's a most notable Coward, an infi­

[1680]

nite and endlesse Lyar, an hourely promise‑breaker, the

owner of no one good qualitie, worthy your Lordships

entertainment.

Cap. G.

It were fit you knew him, least reposing too

farre in his vertue which he hath not, he might at some

[1685]

great and trustie businesse, in a maine daunger, fayle

you.

Ber.

I would I knew in what particular action to try

him.

Cap. G.

None better then to let him fetch off his

[1690]

drumme, which you heare him so confidently vnder­

take to do.

C. E.

I with a troop of Florentines wil sodainly sur­

X2 prize

Download the digital text and images of the play



 
[Act 3, Scene 6] Enter Count Rossillion and the Frenchmen, as at first. Cap. E.
[1670]

Nay good my Lord put him too't: let him

haue his way.

Cap. G.

If your Lordshippe finde him not a Hilding,

hold me no more in your respect.

Cap. E.

On my life my Lord a bubble.

Ber.
[1675]

Do you thinke I am so farre

Deceiued in him.

Cap. E.

Beleeue it my Lord, in mine owne direct

knowledge, without any malice, but to speake of him

as my kinsman, hee's a most notable Coward, an infi­

[1680]

nite and endlesse Lyar, an hourely promise‑breaker, the

owner of no one good qualitie, worthy your Lordships

entertainment.

Cap. G.

It were fit you knew him, least reposing too

farre in his vertue which he hath not, he might at some

[1685]

great and trustie businesse, in a maine daunger, fayle

you.

Ber.

I would I knew in what particular action to try

him.

Cap. G.

None better then to let him fetch off his

[1690]

drumme, which you heare him so confidently vnder­

take to do.

C. E.

I with a troop of Florentines wil sodainly sur­

prize him; such I will haue whom I am sure he knowes

not from the enemie: wee will binde and hoodwinke

[1695]

him so, that he shall suppose no other but that he is car­

ried into the Leager of the aduersaries, when we bring

him to our owne tents: be but your Lordship present

at his examination, if he do not for the promise of his

life, and in the highest compulsion of base feare, offer to

[1700]

betray you, and deliuer all the intelligence in his power

against you, and that with the diuine forfeite of his

soule vpon oath, neuer trust my iudgement in anie

thing.

Cap. G.

O for the loue of laughter, let him fetch his

[1705]

drumme, he sayes he has a stratagem for't: when your

Lordship sees the bottome of this successe in't, and to

what mettle this counterfeyt lump of ours will be mel­

ted if you giue him not Iohn drummes entertainement,

your inclining cannot be remoued. Heere he comes.

Enter Parrolles. Cap. E.
[1710]

O for the loue of laughter hinder not the ho­

nor of his designe, let him fetch off his drumme in any

hand.

Ber.

How now Monsieur? This drumme sticks sore­

ly in your disposition.

Cap. G.
[1715]

A pox on't, let it go, 'tis but a drumme.

Par.

But a drumme: Ist but a drumme? A drum so

lost. There was excellent command, to charge in with

our horse vpon our owne wings, and to rend our owne

souldiers.

Cap. G.
[1720]

That was not to be blam'd in the command

of the seruice: it was a disaster of warre that Cæsar him

selfe could not haue preuented, if he had beene there to

command.

Ber.

Well, wee cannot greatly condemne our suc­

[1725]

cesse: some dishonor wee had in the losse of that drum,

but it is not to be recouered.

Par.

It might haue beene recouered.

Ber.

It might, but it is not now.

Par.

It is to be recouered, but that the merit of ser­

[1730]

uice is sildome attributed to the true and exact perfor­

mer, I would haue that drumme or another, or hic ia­ cet .

Ber.

Why if you haue a stomacke, too't Monsieur: if

you thinke your mysterie in stratagem, can bring this

[1735]

instrument of honour againe into his natiue quarter, be

magnanimious in the enterprize and go on, I wil grace

the attempt for a worthy exploit: if you speede well in

it, the Duke shall both speake of it, and extend to you

what further becomes his greatnesse, euen to the vtmost

[1740]

syllable of your worthinesse.

Par.

By the hand of a souldier I will vndertake it.

Ber.

But you must not now slumber in it.

Par.

Ile about it this euening, and I will presently

pen downe my dilemma's, encourage my selfe in my

[1745]

certaintie, put my selfe into my mortall preparation:

and by midnight looke to heare further from me.

Ber.

May I bee bold to acquaint his grace you are

gone about it.

Par.

I know not what the successe wil be my Lord,

[1750]

but the attempt I vow.

Ber. I know th'art valiant, And to the possibility of thy souldiership, Will subscribe for thee: Farewell. Par.

I loue not many words.

Exit Cap. E.
[1755]

No more then a fish loues water. Is not this a strange fellow my Lord, that so confidently seemes to

vndertake this businesse, which he knowes is not to be

done, damnes himselfe to do, & dares better be damnd

then to doo't.

Cap. G.

You do not know him my Lord as we doe,

[1760]

certaine it is that he will steale himselfe into a mans fa­

uour, and for a weeke escape a great deale of discoue­

ries, but when you finde him out, you haue him euer af­

ter

Ber.

Why do you thinke he will make no deede at

[1765]

all of this that so seriouslie hee dooes addresse himself

vnto?

Cap. E.

None in the world, but returne with an in­

uention, and clap vpon you two or three probable lies:

but we haue almost imbost him, you shall see his fall to

[1770]

night; for indeede he is not for your Lordshippes re­

spect.

Cap. G.

Weele make you some sport with the Foxe

ere we case him. He was first smoak'd by the old Lord

Lafew, when his disguise and he is parted, tell me what

[1775]

a sprat you shall finde him, which you shall see this ve­

rie night.

Cap. E. I must go looke my twigges, He shall be caught. Ber.

Your brother he shall go along with me.

Cap. G.
[1780]

As't please your Lordship, Ile leaue you.

Ber. Now wil I lead you to the house, and shew you The Lasse I spoke of. Cap. E.

But you say she's honest.

Ber. That's all the fault: I spoke with hir but once,
[1785]
And found her wondrous cold, but I sent to her By this same Coxcombe that we haue i'th winde Tokens and Letters, which she did resend, And this is all I haue done: She's a faire creature, Will you go see her?
Cap. E.
[1790]

With all my heart my Lord.

Exeunt.
 

Download the digital text of the play

        
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="6" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 6]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Count Rossillion and the Frenchmen,
      <lb/>as at first.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1670">Nay good my Lord put him too't: let him
      <lb n="1671"/>haue his way.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1672">If your Lordshippe finde him not a Hilding,
      <lb n="1673"/>hold me no more in your respect.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1674">On my life my Lord a bubble.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1675">Do you thinke I am so farre
      <lb n="1676"/>Deceiued in him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1677">Beleeue it my Lord, in mine owne direct
      <lb n="1678"/>knowledge, without any malice, but to speake of him
      <lb n="1679"/>as my kinsman, hee's a most notable Coward, an infi­
      <lb n="1680"/>nite and endlesse Lyar, an hourely promise‑breaker, the
      <lb n="1681"/>owner of no one good qualitie, worthy your Lordships
      <lb n="1682"/>entertainment.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1683">It were fit you knew him, least reposing too
      <lb n="1684"/>farre in his vertue which he hath not, he might at some
      <lb n="1685"/>great and trustie businesse, in a maine daunger, fayle
      <lb n="1686"/>you.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1687">I would I knew in what particular action to try
      <lb n="1688"/>him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1689">None better then to let him fetch off his
      <lb n="1690"/>drumme, which you heare him so confidently vnder­
      <lb n="1691"/>take to do.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">C. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1692">I with a troop of Florentines wil sodainly sur­
      <lb n="1693"/>
         <pb facs="FFimg:axc0264-0.jpg" n="244"/>
         <cb n="1"/>prize him; such I will haue whom I am sure he knowes
      <lb n="1694"/>not from the enemie: wee will binde and hoodwinke
      <lb n="1695"/>him so, that he shall suppose no other but that he is car­
      <lb n="1696"/>ried into the Leager of the aduersaries, when we bring
      <lb n="1697"/>him to our owne tents: be but your Lordship present
      <lb n="1698"/>at his examination, if he do not for the promise of his
      <lb n="1699"/>life, and in the highest compulsion of base feare, offer to
      <lb n="1700"/>betray you, and deliuer all the intelligence in his power
      <lb n="1701"/>against you, and that with the diuine forfeite of his
      <lb n="1702"/>soule vpon oath, neuer trust my iudgement in anie
      <lb n="1703"/>thing.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1704">O for the loue of laughter, let him fetch his
      <lb n="1705"/>drumme, he sayes he has a stratagem for't: when your
      <lb n="1706"/>Lordship sees the bottome of this successe in't, and to
      <lb n="1707"/>what mettle this counterfeyt lump of ours will be mel­
      <lb n="1708"/>ted if you giue him not Iohn drummes entertainement,
      <lb n="1709"/>your inclining cannot be remoued. Heere he comes.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Parrolles.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1710">O for the loue of laughter hinder not the ho­
      <lb n="1711"/>nor of his designe, let him fetch off his drumme in any
      <lb n="1712"/>hand.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1713">How now Monsieur? This drumme sticks sore­
      <lb n="1714"/>ly in your disposition.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1715">A pox on't, let it go, 'tis but a drumme.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <p n="1716">But a drumme: Ist but a drumme? A drum so
      <lb n="1717"/>lost. There was excellent command, to charge in with
      <lb n="1718"/>our horse vpon our owne wings, and to rend our owne
      <lb n="1719"/>souldiers.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1720">That was not to be blam'd in the command
      <lb n="1721"/>of the seruice: it was a disaster of warre that<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>him
      <lb n="1722"/>selfe could not haue preuented, if he had beene there to
      <lb n="1723"/>command.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1724">Well, wee cannot greatly condemne our suc­
      <lb n="1725"/>cesse: some dishonor wee had in the losse of that drum,
      <lb n="1726"/>but it is not to be recouered.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <p n="1727">It might haue beene recouered.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1728">It might, but it is not now.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <p n="1729">It is to be recouered, but that the merit of ser­
      <lb n="1730"/>uice is sildome attributed to the true and exact perfor­
      <lb n="1731"/>mer, I would haue that drumme or another, or<hi rend="italic">hic ia­
      <lb n="1732"/>cet</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1733">Why if you haue a stomacke, too't Monsieur: if
      <lb n="1734"/>you thinke your mysterie in stratagem, can bring this
      <lb n="1735"/>instrument of honour againe into his natiue quarter, be
      <lb n="1736"/>magnanimious in the enterprize and go on, I wil grace
      <lb n="1737"/>the attempt for a worthy exploit: if you speede well in
      <lb n="1738"/>it, the Duke shall both speake of it, and extend to you
      <lb n="1739"/>what further becomes his greatnesse, euen to the vtmost
      <lb n="1740"/>syllable of your worthinesse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <p n="1741">By the hand of a souldier I will vndertake it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1742">But you must not now slumber in it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <p n="1743">Ile about it this euening, and I will presently
      <lb n="1744"/>pen downe my dilemma's, encourage my selfe in my
      <lb n="1745"/>certaintie, put my selfe into my mortall preparation:
      <lb n="1746"/>and by midnight looke to heare further from me.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1747">May I bee bold to acquaint his grace you are
      <lb n="1748"/>gone about it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <p n="1749">I know not what the successe wil be my Lord,
      <lb n="1750"/>but the attempt I vow.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <l n="1751">I know th'art valiant,</l>
      <l n="1752">And to the possibility of thy souldiership,</l>
      <l n="1753">Will subscribe for thee: Farewell.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <p n="1754">I loue not many words.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit</stage>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1755">No more then a fish loues water. Is not this<cb n="2"/>a strange fellow my Lord, that so confidently seemes to
      <lb n="1756"/>vndertake this businesse, which he knowes is not to be
      <lb n="1757"/>done, damnes himselfe to do, &amp; dares better be damnd
      <lb n="1758"/>then to doo't.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1759">You do not know him my Lord as we doe,
      <lb n="1760"/>certaine it is that he will steale himselfe into a mans fa­
      <lb n="1761"/>uour, and for a weeke escape a great deale of discoue­
      <lb n="1762"/>ries, but when you finde him out, you haue him euer af­
      <lb n="1763"/>ter</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1764">Why do you thinke he will make no deede at
      <lb n="1765"/>all of this that so seriouslie hee dooes addresse himself
      <lb n="1766"/>vnto?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1767">None in the world, but returne with an in­
      <lb n="1768"/>uention, and clap vpon you two or three probable lies:
      <lb n="1769"/>but we haue almost imbost him, you shall see his fall to
      <lb n="1770"/>night; for indeede he is not for your Lordshippes re­
      <lb n="1771"/>spect.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1772">Weele make you some sport with the Foxe
      <lb n="1773"/>ere we case him. He was first smoak'd by the old Lord
      <lb n="1774"/>
         <hi rend="italic">Lafew</hi>, when his disguise and he is parted, tell me what
      <lb n="1775"/>a sprat you shall finde him, which you shall see this ve­
      <lb n="1776"/>rie night.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <l n="1777">I must go looke my twigges,</l>
      <l n="1778">He shall be caught.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <p n="1779">Your brother he shall go along with me.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. G.</speaker>
      <p n="1780">As't please your Lordship, Ile leaue you.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <l n="1781">Now wil I lead you to the house, and shew you</l>
      <l n="1782">The Lasse I spoke of.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1783">But you say she's honest.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-ber">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ber.</speaker>
      <l n="1784">That's all the fault: I spoke with hir but once,</l>
      <l n="1785">And found her wondrous cold, but I sent to her</l>
      <l n="1786">By this same Coxcombe that we haue i'th winde</l>
      <l n="1787">Tokens and Letters, which she did resend,</l>
      <l n="1788">And this is all I haue done: She's a faire creature,</l>
      <l n="1789">Will you go see her?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-aww-cpe">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cap. E.</speaker>
      <p n="1790">With all my heart my Lord.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

Download the XML