The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: Q6v - Comedies, p. 192

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As you like it. Ros. Peace I say; good euen to your friend. Cor.
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And to you gentle Sir, and to you all.
Ros. I prethee Shepheard, if that loue or gold Can in this desert place buy entertainment, Bring vs where we may rest our selues, and feed: Here's a yong maid with trauaile much oppressed,
[830]
And faints for succour.
Cor. Faire Sir, I pittie her, And wish for her sake more then for mine owne, My fortunes were more able to releeue her: But I am shepheard to another man,
[835]
And do not sheere the Fleeces that I graze: My master is of churlish disposition, And little wreakes to finde the way to heauen By doing deeds of hospitalitie. Besides his Coate, his Flockes, and bounds of feede
[840]
Are now on sale, and at our sheep‑coat now By reason of his absence there is nothing That you will feed on: but what is, come see, And in my voice most welcome shall you be.
Ros. What is he that shall buy his flocke and pasture ? Cor.
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That yong Swaine that you saw heere but ere­ while, That little cares for buying any thing.
Ros. I pray thee, if it stand with honestie, Buy thou the Cottage, pasture, and the flocke, And thou shalt haue to pay for it of vs. Cel.
[850]
And we will mend thy wages: I like this place, and willingly could Waste my time in it.
Cor. Assuredly the thing is to be sold: Go with me, if you like vpon report,
[855]
The soile, the profit, and this kinde of life, I will your very faithfull Feeder be, And buy it with your Gold right sodainly.
Exeunt.
Scena Quinta. [Act 2, Scene 5] Enter, Amyens, Iaques, & others. Song. Vnder the greene wood tree, who loues to lye with mee,
[860]
And turne his merrie Note, vnto the sweet Birds throte: Come hither, come hither, come hither: Heere shall he see no enemie, But Winter and rough Weather.
Iaq.
[865]
More, more, I pre'thee more.
Amy. It will make you melancholly Monsieur Iaques. Iaq. I thanke it: More, I prethee more, I can sucke melancholly out of a song, As a Weazel suckes egges: More, I pre'thee more. Amy.
[870]
My voice is ragged, I know I cannot please you.
Iaq. I do not desire you to please me, I do desire you to sing: Come, more, another stanzo: Cal you 'em stanzo's? Amy. What you wil Monsieur Iaques. Iaq.
[875]

Nay, I care not for their names, they owe mee

nothing. Wil you sing?

A

More at your request, then to please my selfe.

ell then, if euer I thanke any man, Ile thanke

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Right Column


you: but that they cal complement is like th'encounter

[880]

of two dog‑Apes. And when a man thankes me hartily,

me thinkes I haue giuen him a penie, and he renders me

the beggerly thankes. Come sing; and you that wil not

hold your tongues.

Amy.

Wel, Ile end the song. Sirs, couer the while,

[885]

the Duke wil drinke vnder this tree; he hath bin all this

day to looke you.

Iaq. And I haue bin all this day to auoid him: He is too disputeable for my companie: I thinke of as many matters as he, but I giue
[890]
Heauen thankes, and make no boast of them. Come, warble, come.
Song. Altogether heere. Who doth ambition shunne, and loues to liue i'th Sunne: Seeking the food he eates,
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and pleas'd with what he gets: Come hither, come hither, come hither, Heere shall he see. &c.
Iaq. Ile giue you a verse to this note, That I made yesterday in despight of my Inuention. Amy.
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And Ile sing it.
Amy. Thus it goes. If it do come to passe, that any man turne Asse: Leauing his wealth and ease, A stubborne will to please,
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Ducdame, ducdame, ducdame: Heere shall he see, grosse fooles as he, And if he will come to me.
Amy. What's that Ducdame? Iaq.

'Tis a Greeke inuocation, to call fools into a cir­

[910]

cle. Ile go sleepe if I can: if I cannot, Ile raile against all

the first borne of Egypt.

Amy. And Ile go seeke the Duke, His banket is prepar'd. Exeunt.
Scena Sexta. [Act 2, Scene 6] Enter Orlando, & Adam. Adam. Deere Master, I can go no further:
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O I die for food. Heere lie I downe, And measure out my graue. Farwel kinde master.
Orl. Why how now Adam? No greater heart in thee: Liue a little, comfort a little, cheere thy selfe a little. If this vncouth Forrest yeeld any thing sauage,
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I wil either be food for it, or bring it for foode to thee: Thy conceite is neerer death, then thy powers. For my sake be comfortable, hold death a while At the armes end: I wil heere be with thee presently, And if I bring thee not something to eate,
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I wil giue thee leaue to die: but if thou diest Before I come, thou art a mocker of my labor. Wel said, thou look'st cheerely, And Ile be with thee quickly: yet thou liest In the bleake aire. Come, I wil beare thee
[930]
To some shelter, and thou shalt not die For lacke of a dinner, If there liue any thing in this Desert. Cheerely good Adam.
Exeunt
Scena

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Scena Sexta. [Act 2, Scene 6] Enter Orlando, & Adam. Adam. Deere Master, I can go no further:
[915]
O I die for food. Heere lie I downe, And measure out my graue. Farwel kinde master.
Orl. Why how now Adam? No greater heart in thee: Liue a little, comfort a little, cheere thy selfe a little. If this vncouth Forrest yeeld any thing sauage,
[920]
I wil either be food for it, or bring it for foode to thee: Thy conceite is neerer death, then thy powers. For my sake be comfortable, hold death a while At the armes end: I wil heere be with thee presently, And if I bring thee not something to eate,
[925]
I wil giue thee leaue to die: but if thou diest Before I come, thou art a mocker of my labor. Wel said, thou look'st cheerely, And Ile be with thee quickly: yet thou liest In the bleake aire. Come, I wil beare thee
[930]
To some shelter, and thou shalt not die For lacke of a dinner, If there liue any thing in this Desert. Cheerely good Adam.
Exeunt
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="6">
   <head rend="italic center">Scena Sexta.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 2, Scene 6]</head>
   <stage rend="italic" type="entrance">Enter Orlando, &amp; Adam.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-ayl-ada">
      <speaker rend="italic">Adam.</speaker>
      <l n="914">Deere Master, I can go no further:</l>
      <l n="915">O I die for food. Heere lie I downe,</l>
      <l n="916">And measure out my graue. Farwel kinde master.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ayl-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orl.</speaker>
      <l n="917">Why how now<hi rend="italic">Adam</hi>? No greater heart in thee:</l>
      <l n="918">Liue a little, comfort a little, cheere thy selfe a little.</l>
      <l n="919">If this vncouth Forrest yeeld any thing sauage,</l>
      <l n="920">I wil either be food for it, or bring it for foode to thee:</l>
      <l n="921">Thy conceite is neerer death, then thy powers.</l>
      <l n="922">For my sake be comfortable, hold death a while</l>
      <l n="923">At the armes end: I wil heere be with thee presently,</l>
      <l n="924">And if I bring thee not something to eate,</l>
      <l n="925">I wil giue thee leaue to die: but if thou diest</l>
      <l n="926">Before I come, thou art a mocker of my labor.</l>
      <l n="927">Wel said, thou look'st cheerely,</l>
      <l n="928">And Ile be with thee quickly: yet thou liest</l>
      <l n="929">In the bleake aire. Come, I wil beare thee</l>
      <l n="930">To some shelter, and thou shalt not die</l>
      <l n="931">For lacke of a dinner,</l>
      <l n="932">If there liue any thing in this Desert.</l>
      <l n="933">Cheerely good<hi rend="italic">Adam</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt</stage>
</div>

        
        

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