The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: aa3r - Tragedies, p. 5

Left Column


The Tragedie of Coriolanus. Mar.

Say, ha's our Generall met the Enemy?

Mess.

They lye in view, but haue not spoke as yet.

Lart.

So, the good Horse is mine.

Mart.
[470]

Ile buy him of you.

Lart. No, Ile nor sel, nor giue him: Lend you him I will For halfe a hundred yeares: Summon the Towne. Mar.

How farre off lie these Armies?

Mess.

Within this mile and halfe.

Mar.
[475]
Then shall we heare their Larum, & they Ours. Now Mars, I prythee make vs quicke in worke, That we with smoaking swords may march from hence To helpe our fielded Friends. Come, blow thy blast. They Sound a Parley: Enter two Senators with others on the Walles of Corialus. Tullus Auffidious, is he within your Walles?
1. Senat.
[480]
No, nor a man that feares you lesse then he, That's lesser then a little: Drum a farre off. Hearke, our Drummes Are bringing forth our youth: Wee'l breake our Walles Rather then they shall pound vs vp our Gates,
[485]
Which yet seeme shut, we haue but pin'd with Rushes, They'le open of themselues. Harke you, farre off Alarum farre off. There is Auffidious. List what worke he makes Among'st your clouen Army.
Mart.

Oh they are at it.

Lart.
[490]
Their noise be our instruction. Ladders hoa.
Enter the Army of the Volces. Mar. They feare vs not, but issue forth their Citie. Now put your Shields before your hearts, and fight With hearts more proofe then Shields. Aduance braue Titus,
[495]
They do disdaine vs much beyond our Thoughts, which makes me sweat with wrath. Come on my fellows He that retires, Ile take him for a Volce, And he shall feele mine edge.
Alarum, the Romans are beat back to their Trenches Enter Martius Cursing. Mar. All the contagion of the South, light on you,
[500]
You Shames of Rome: you Heard of Byles and Plagues Plaister you o're, that you may be abhorr'd Farther then seene, and one infect another Against the Winde a mile: you soules of Geese, That beare the shapes of men, how haue you run
[505]
From Slaues, that Apes would beate; Pluto and Hell, All hurt behinde, backes red, and faces pale With flight and agued feare, mend and charge home, Or by the fires of heauen, Ile leaue the Foe, And make my Warres on you: Looke too't: Come on,
[510]
If you'l stand fast, wee'l beate them to their Wiues, As they vs to our Trenches followes. Another Alarum, and Martius followes them to gates, and is shut in. So, now the gates are ope: now proue good Seconds, 'Tis for the followers Fortune, widens them, Not for the flyers: Marke me, and do the like.
Enter the Gati. 1. Sol.
[515]

Foole‑hardinesse, not I.

2. Sol.

Nor I

1. Sol.

See they haue shut him in.

Alarum continues All.

To th'pot I warrant him.

Enter Titus Lartius Tit.

What is become of Martius?

All.
[520]

Slaine (Sir) doubtlesse.

1. Sol. Following the Flyers at the very heeles,

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Right Column


With them he enters: who vpon the sodaine Clapt to their Gates, he is himselfe alone, To answer all the City. Lar.
[525]
Oh Noble Fellow! Who sensibly out‑dares his sencelesse Sword, And when it bowes, stand'st vp: Thou art left Martius, A Carbuncle intire: as big as thou art Weare not so rich a Iewell. Thou was't a Souldier
[530]
Euen to Calues wish, not fierce and terrible Onely in strokes, but with thy grim lookes, and The Thunder‑like percussion of thy sounds Thou mad'st thine enemies shake, as if the World Were Feauorous, and did tremble.
Enter Martius bleeding, assaulted by the Enemy. 1. Sol.
[535]

Looke Sir.

Lar. O 'tis Martius. Let's fetch him off, or make remaine alike. They fight, and all enter the City.
[Act 1, Scene 5] Enter certaine Romanes with spoiles. 1. Rom.

This will I carry to Rome.

2. Rom.

And I this.

3. Rom.
[540]

A Murrain on't, I tooke this for Siluer.

exeunt. Alarum continues still a‑farre off. Enter Martius, and Titus with a Trumpet. Mar. See heere these mouers, that do prize their hours/> At a crack'd Drachme: Cushions, Leaden Spoones, Irons of a Doit, Dublets that Hangmen would Bury with those that wore them. These base slaues,
[545]
Ere yet the fight be done, packe vp, downe with them. And harke, what noyse the Generall makes: To him There is the man of my soules hate, Auffidious, Piercing our Romanes: Then Valiant Titus take Conuenient Numbers to make good the City,
[550]
Whil'st I with those that haue the spirit, wil haste To helpe Cominius
Lar. Worthy Sir, thou bleed'st, Thy exercise hath bin too violent, For a second course of Fight. Mar.
[555]
Sir, praise me not: My worke hath yet not warm'd me. Fare you well: The blood I drop, is rather Physicall Then dangerous to me: To Auffidious thus, I will appear (and fight.
Lar. Now the faire Goddesse Fortune,
[560]
Fall deepe in loue with thee, and her great charmes Misguide thy Opposers swords, Bold Gentleman: Prosperity be thy Page.
Mar. Thy Friend no lesse, Then those she placeth highest: So farewell. Lar.
[565]
Thou worthiest Martius, Go sound thy Trumpet in the Market place, Call thither all the Officers a'th'Towne, Where they shall know our minde. Away.
Exeunt.
[Act 1, Scene 6] Enter Cominius as it were in retire, with soldiers. Com. Breath you my friends, wel fought, we are come (off,
[570]
Like Romans, neither foolish in our stands, Nor Cowardly in retyre: Beleeue me Sirs, We shall be charg'd againe. Whiles we haue strooke By Interims and conueying gusts, we haue heard The Charges of our Friends. The Roman Gods,
[575]
Leade their successes, as we wish our owne, That both our powers, with smiling Fronts encountring, May giue you thankfull Sacrifice. Thy Newes?
Enter a Messenger. Mess. The Cittizens of Corioles haue yssued, And giuen to Lartius and to Martius Battaile: aa3 I saw

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[Act 1, Scene 6] Enter Cominius as it were in retire, with soldiers. Com. Breath you my friends, wel fought, we are come (off,
[570]
Like Romans, neither foolish in our stands, Nor Cowardly in retyre: Beleeue me Sirs, We shall be charg'd againe. Whiles we haue strooke By Interims and conueying gusts, we haue heard The Charges of our Friends. The Roman Gods,
[575]
Leade their successes, as we wish our owne, That both our powers, with smiling Fronts encountring, May giue you thankfull Sacrifice. Thy Newes?
Enter a Messenger. Mess. The Cittizens of Corioles haue yssued, And giuen to Lartius and to Martius Battaile:
[580]
I saw our party to their Trenches driuen, And then I came away.
Com. Though thou speakest truth, Me thinkes thou speak'st not well. How long is't since? Mes.

Aboue an houre, my Lord.

Com.
[585]
'Tis not a mile: briefely we heard their drummes. How could'st thou in a mile confound an houre, And bring thy Newes so late?
Mes. Spies of the Volces Held me in chace, that I was forc'd to wheele
[590]
Three or foure miles about, else had I sir Halfe an houre since brought my report.
Enter Martius. Com. Whose yonder, That doe's appeare as he were Flead? O Gods, He has the stampe of Martius, and I haue
[595]
Before time seene him thus.
Mar.

Come I too late?

Com. The Shepherd knowes not Thunder frō from a Taber, More then I know the sound of Martius Tongue From euery meaner man. Martius.
[600]

Come I too late?

Com. I, if you come not in the blood of others, But mantled in your owne. Mart. Oh! let me clip ye In Armes as sound, as when I woo'd in heart;
[605]
As merry, as when our Nuptiall day was done, And Tapers burnt to Bedward.
Com.

Flower of Warriors, how is't with Titus Lartius?

Mar. As with a man busied about Decrees: Condemning some to death, and some to exile,
[610]
Ransoming him, or pittying, threatning th' other; Holding Corioles in the name of Rome, Euen like a fawning Grey‑hound in the Leash, To let him slip at will.
Com. Where is that Slaue
[615]
Which told me they had beate you to your Trenches? Where is he? Call him hither.
Mar. Let him alone, He did informe the truth: but for our Gentlemen, The common file, (a plague‑Tribunes for them)
[620]
The Mouse ne're shunn'd the Cat, as they did budge From Rascals worse then they.
Com.

But how preuail'd you?

Mar. Will the time serue to tell, I do not thinke: Where is the enemy? Are you Lords a'th Field?
[625]
If not, why cease you till you are so?
Com. Martius, we haue at disaduantage fought, And did retyre to win our purpose. Mar. How lies their Battell? Know you on which side They haue plac'd their men of trust? Com.
[630]
As I guesse Martius, Their Bands i'th Vaward are the Antients Of their best trust: O're them Auffidious, Their very heart of Hope.
Mar. I do beseech you,
[635]
By all the Battailes wherein we haue fought, By th'Blood we haue shed together, By th'Vowes we haue made To endure Friends, that you directly set me Against Affidious, and his Antiats,
[640]
And that you not delay the present (but Filling the aire with Swords aduanc'd) and Darts, We proue this very houre.
Com. Though I could wish, You were conducted to a gentle Bath,
[645]
And Balmes applyed to you, yet dare I neuer Deny your asking, take your choice of those That best can ayde your action.
Mar. Those are they That most are willing; if any such be heere,
[650]
(As it were sinne to doubt) that loue this painting Wherein you see me smear'd, if any feare Lessen his person, then an ill report: If any thinke, braue death out‑weighes bad life, And that his Countries deerer then himselfe,
[655]
Let him alone: Or so many so minded, Waue thus to expresse his disposition, And follow Martius. They all shout and waue their swords, take him vp in their Armes, and cast vp their Caps. Oh me alone, make you a sword of me: If these shewes be not outward, which of you
[660]
But is foure Volces? None of you, but is Able to beare against the great Auffidious A Shield, as hard as his. A certaine number (Though thankes to all) must I select from all: The rest shall beare the businesse in some other fight
[665]
(As cause will be obey'd:) please you to March, And foure shall quickly draw out my Command, Which men are best inclin'd.
Com. March on my Fellowes: Make good this ostentation, and you shall
[670]
Diuide in all, with vs.
Exeunt
 

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<div type="scene" n="6" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 1, Scene 6]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Cominius as it were in retire, with soldiers.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="569">Breath you my friends, wel fought, we are come
      <lb rend="turnunder"/>
         <pc rend="turnunder">(</pc>off,</l>
      <l n="570">Like Romans, neither foolish in our stands,</l>
      <l n="571">Nor Cowardly in retyre: Beleeue me Sirs,</l>
      <l n="572">We shall be charg'd againe. Whiles we haue strooke</l>
      <l n="573">By Interims and conueying gusts, we haue heard</l>
      <l n="574">The Charges of our Friends. The Roman Gods,</l>
      <l n="575">Leade their successes, as we wish our owne,</l>
      <l n="576">That both our powers, with smiling Fronts encountring,</l>
      <l n="577">May giue you thankfull Sacrifice. Thy Newes?</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter a Messenger.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-cor-mes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mess.</speaker>
      <l n="578">The Cittizens of Corioles haue yssued,</l>
      <l n="579">And giuen to<hi rend="italic">Lartius</hi>and to<hi rend="italic">Martius</hi>Battaile:</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0624-0.jpg" n="6"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="580">I saw our party to their Trenches driuen,</l>
      <l n="581">And then I came away.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="582">Though thou speakest truth,</l>
      <l n="583">Me thinkes thou speak'st not well. How long is't since?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-mes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mes.</speaker>
      <p n="584">Aboue an houre, my Lord.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="585">'Tis not a mile: briefely we heard their drummes.</l>
      <l n="586">How could'st thou in a mile confound an houre,</l>
      <l n="587">And bring thy Newes so late?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-mes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mes.</speaker>
      <l n="588">Spies of the<hi rend="italic">Volces</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="589">Held me in chace, that I was forc'd to wheele</l>
      <l n="590">Three or foure miles about, else had I sir</l>
      <l n="591">Halfe an houre since brought my report.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Martius.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="592">Whose yonder,</l>
      <l n="593">That doe's appeare as he were Flead? O Gods,</l>
      <l n="594">He has the stampe of<hi rend="italic">Martius</hi>, and I haue</l>
      <l n="595">Before time seene him thus.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <p n="596">Come I too late?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="597">The Shepherd knowes not Thunder<choice>
            <abbr>frō</abbr>
            <expan>from</expan>
         </choice>a Taber,</l>
      <l n="598">More then I know the sound of<hi rend="italic">Martius</hi>Tongue</l>
      <l n="599">From euery meaner man.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Martius.</speaker>
      <p n="600">Come I too late?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="601">I, if you come not in the blood of others,</l>
      <l n="602">But mantled in your owne.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mart.</speaker>
      <l n="603">Oh! let me clip ye</l>
      <l n="604">In Armes as sound, as when I woo'd in heart;</l>
      <l n="605">As merry, as when our Nuptiall day was done,</l>
      <l n="606">And Tapers burnt to Bedward.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <p n="607">Flower of Warriors, how is't with<hi rend="italic">Titus Lartius</hi>?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="608">As with a man busied about Decrees:</l>
      <l n="609">Condemning some to death, and some to exile,</l>
      <l n="610">Ransoming him, or pittying, threatning th' other;</l>
      <l n="611">Holding<hi rend="italic">Corioles</hi>in the name of Rome,</l>
      <l n="612">Euen like a fawning Grey‑hound in the Leash,</l>
      <l n="613">To let him slip at will.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="614">Where is that Slaue</l>
      <l n="615">Which told me they had beate you to your Trenches?</l>
      <l n="616">Where is he? Call him hither.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="617">Let him alone,</l>
      <l n="618">He did informe the truth: but for our Gentlemen,</l>
      <l n="619">The common file, (a plague‑Tribunes for them)</l>
      <l n="620">The Mouse ne're shunn'd the Cat, as they did budge</l>
      <l n="621">From Rascals worse then they.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <p n="622">But how preuail'd you?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="623">Will the time serue to tell, I do not thinke:</l>
      <l n="624">Where is the enemy? Are you Lords a'th Field?</l>
      <l n="625">If not, why cease you till you are so?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="626">
         <hi rend="italic">Martius</hi>, we haue at disaduantage fought,</l>
      <l n="627">And did retyre to win our purpose.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="628">How lies their Battell? Know you on<choice>
            <abbr>wͨ</abbr>
            <expan>which</expan>
         </choice>side</l>
      <l n="629">They haue plac'd their men of trust?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="630">As I guesse<hi rend="italic">Martius</hi>,</l>
      <l n="631">Their Bands i'th Vaward are the Antients</l>
      <l n="632">Of their best trust: O're them<hi rend="italic">Auffidious</hi>,</l>
      <l n="633">Their very heart of Hope.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="634">I do beseech you,</l>
      <l n="635">By all the Battailes wherein we haue fought,</l>
      <l n="636">By th'Blood we haue shed together,</l>
      <l n="637">By th'Vowes we haue made</l>
      <l n="638">To endure Friends, that you directly set me</l>
      <l n="639">Against<hi rend="italic">Affidious</hi>, and his<hi rend="italic">Antiats</hi>,</l>
      <l n="640">And that you not delay the present (but</l>
      <l n="641">Filling the aire with Swords aduanc'd) and Darts,</l>
      <l n="642">We proue this very houre.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="643">Though I could wish,</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="644">You were conducted to a gentle Bath,</l>
      <l n="645">And Balmes applyed to you, yet dare I neuer</l>
      <l n="646">Deny your asking, take your choice of those</l>
      <l n="647">That best can ayde your action.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-cor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="648">Those are they</l>
      <l n="649">That most are willing; if any such be heere,</l>
      <l n="650">(As it were sinne to doubt) that loue this painting</l>
      <l n="651">Wherein you see me smear'd, if any feare</l>
      <l n="652">Lessen his person, then an ill report:</l>
      <l n="653">If any thinke, braue death out‑weighes bad life,</l>
      <l n="654">And that his Countries deerer then himselfe,</l>
      <l n="655">Let him alone: Or so many so minded,</l>
      <l n="656">Waue thus to expresse his disposition,</l>
      <l n="657">And follow<hi rend="italic">Martius</hi>.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="business">They all shout and waue their swords, take him vp in their
      <lb/>Armes, and cast vp their Caps.</stage>
      <l n="658">Oh me alone, make you a sword of me:</l>
      <l n="659">If these shewes be not outward, which of you</l>
      <l n="660">But is foure<hi rend="italic">Volces</hi>? None of you, but is</l>
      <l n="661">Able to beare against the great<hi rend="italic">Auffidious</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="662">A Shield, as hard as his. A certaine number</l>
      <l n="663">(Though thankes to all) must I select from all:</l>
      <l n="664">The rest shall beare the businesse in some other fight</l>
      <l n="665">(As cause will be obey'd:) please you to March,</l>
      <l n="666">And foure shall quickly draw out my Command,</l>
      <l n="667">Which men are best inclin'd.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-com">
      <speaker rend="italic">Com.</speaker>
      <l n="668">March on my Fellowes:</l>
      <l n="669">Make good this ostentation, and you shall</l>
      <l n="670">Diuide in all, with vs.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic inline" type="exit">Exeunt</stage>
</div>

        
        

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