The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



Text and Image

Here you can read a digital edition of each play in various views.

Page Image & Text
Digital Text
XML

Reference: cc1r - Tragedies, p. 25

Left Column


The Tragedie of Coriolanus. 1 Cit.

The Gods bee good to vs: Come Masters let's

home, I euer said we were i'th wrong, when we banish'd

him.

2 Cit.

So did we all. But come, let's home.

Exit Cit. Bru.
[2940]

I do not like this Newes.

Sicin.

Nor I.

Bru. Let's to the Capitoll: would halfe my wealth Would buy this for a lye. Sicin.

Pray let's go.

Exeunt Tribunes.
[Act 4, Scene 7] Enter Auffidius with his Lieutenant. Auf.
[2945]

Do they still flye to'th'Roman?

Lieu. I do not know what Witchcraft's in him: but Your Soldiers vse him as the Grace 'fore meate, Their talke at Table, and their Thankes at end, And you are darkned in this action Sir,
[2950]
Euen by your owne.
Auf. I cannot helpe it now, Vnlesse by vsing meanes I lame the foote Of our designe. He beares himselfe more proudlier, Euen to my person, then I thought he would
[2955]
When first I did embrace him. Yet his Nature In that's no Changeling, and I must excuse What cannot be amended.
Lieu. Yet I wish Sir, (I meane for your particular) you had not
[2960]
Ioyn'd in Commission with him: but either haue borne The action of your selfe, or else to him, had left it soly.
Auf. I vnderstand thee well, and be thou sure When he shall come to his account, he knowes not What I can vrge against him, although it seemes
[2965]
And so he thinkes, and is no lesse apparant To th'vulgar eye, that he beares all things fairely: And shewes good Husbandry for the Volcian State, Fights Dragon‑like, and does atcheeue as soone As draw his Sword: yet he hath left vndone
[2970]
That which shall breake his necke, or hazard mine, When ere we come to our account.
Lieu.

Sir, I beseech you, think you he'l carry Rome?

Auf. All places yeelds to him ere he sits downe, And the Nobility of Rome are his:
[2975]
The Senators and Patricians loue him too: The Tribunes are no Soldiers: and their people Will be as rash in the repeale, as hasty To expell him thence. I thinke hee'l be to Rome As is the Aspray to the Fish, who takes it
[2980]
By Soueraignty of Nature. First, he was A Noble seruant to them, but he could not Carry his Honors eeuen euen : whether 'was Pride Which out of dayly Fortune euer taints The happy man; whether detect of iudgement,
[2985]
To faile in the disposing of those chances Which he was Lord of: or whether Nature, Not to be other then one thing, not moouing From th'Caske to th'Cushion: but commanding peace Euen with the same austerity and garbe,
[2990]
As he controll'd the warre. But one of these (As he hath spices of them all) not all, For I dare so farre free him, made him fear'd, So hated, and so banish'd: but he ha's a Merit To choake it in the vtt'rance: So our Vertue,
[2995]
Lie in th'interpretation of the time, And power vnto it selfe most commendable, Hath not a Tombe so euident as a Chaire T'extoll what it hath done. One fire d es out one fire; one Naile, one Naile;
[3000]
Rights by rights fouler, strengths by strengths do faile.

Image


[full image]

Right Column


Come let's away: when Caius Rome is thine, Thou art poor'st of all; then shortly art thou mine. exeunt
Actus Quintus. [Act 5, Scene 1] Enter Menenius, Cominius, Sicinius, Brutus, the two Tribunes, with others. Menen. No, ile not go: you heare what he hath said Which was sometime his Generall: who loued him
[3005]
In a most deere particular. He call'd me Father: But what o'that? Go you that banish'd him A Mile before his Tent, fall downe, and knee The way into his mercy: Nay, if he coy'd To heare Cominius speake, Ile keepe at home.
Com.
[3010]

He would not seeme to know me.

Menen.

Do you heare?

Com. Yet one time he did call me by my name: I vrg'd our old acquaintance, and the drops That we haue bled together. Coriolanus
[3015]
He would not answer too: Forbad all Names, He was a kinde of Nothing, Titlelesse, Till he had forg'd himselfe a name a'th'fire Of burning Rome.
Menen. Why so: you haue made good worke:
[3020]
A paire of Tribunes, that haue wrack'd for Rome, To make Coales cheape: A Noble memory.
Com. I minded him, how Royall 'twas to pardon When it was lesse expected. He replyed It was a bare petition of a State
[3025]
To one whom they had punish'd
Menen.

Very well, could he say lesse.

Com. I offered to awaken his regard For's priuate Friends. His answer to me was He could not stay to picke them, in a pile
[3030]
Of noysome musty Chaffe. He said, 'twas folly For one poore graine or two, to leaue vnburnt And still to nose th'offence.
Menen. For one poore graine or two? I am one of those: his Mother, Wife, his Childe,
[3035]
And this braue Fellow too: we are the Graines, You are the musty Chaffe, and you are smelt Aboue the Moone. We must be burnt for you.
Sicin. Nay, pray be patient: If you refuse your ayde In this so neuer‑needed helpe, yet do not
[3040]
Vpbraid's with our distresse. But sure if you Would be your Countries Pleader, your good tongue More then the instant Armie we can make Might stop our Countryman.
Mene.

No: Ile not meddle.

Sicin.
[3045]

Pray you go to him.

Mene.

What should I do?

Bru. Onely make triall what your Loue can do, For Rome, towards Martius. Mene. Well, and say that Martius returne mee,
[3050]
As Cominius is return'd, vnheard: what then? But as a discontented Friend, greefe‑shot With his vnkindnesse. Say't be so?
Sicin. Yet your good will Must haue that thankes from Rome, after the measure
[3055]
As you intended well
Mene. Ile vndertak't: I thinke hee'l heare me. Yet to bite his lip, And humme at good Cominius, much vnhearts mee. cc Hee

Download the digital text and images of the play



 
[Act 4, Scene 7] Enter Auffidius with his Lieutenant. Auf.
[2945]

Do they still flye to'th'Roman?

Lieu. I do not know what Witchcraft's in him: but Your Soldiers vse him as the Grace 'fore meate, Their talke at Table, and their Thankes at end, And you are darkned in this action Sir,
[2950]
Euen by your owne.
Auf. I cannot helpe it now, Vnlesse by vsing meanes I lame the foote Of our designe. He beares himselfe more proudlier, Euen to my person, then I thought he would
[2955]
When first I did embrace him. Yet his Nature In that's no Changeling, and I must excuse What cannot be amended.
Lieu. Yet I wish Sir, (I meane for your particular) you had not
[2960]
Ioyn'd in Commission with him: but either haue borne The action of your selfe, or else to him, had left it soly.
Auf. I vnderstand thee well, and be thou sure When he shall come to his account, he knowes not What I can vrge against him, although it seemes
[2965]
And so he thinkes, and is no lesse apparant To th'vulgar eye, that he beares all things fairely: And shewes good Husbandry for the Volcian State, Fights Dragon‑like, and does atcheeue as soone As draw his Sword: yet he hath left vndone
[2970]
That which shall breake his necke, or hazard mine, When ere we come to our account.
Lieu.

Sir, I beseech you, think you he'l carry Rome?

Auf. All places yeelds to him ere he sits downe, And the Nobility of Rome are his:
[2975]
The Senators and Patricians loue him too: The Tribunes are no Soldiers: and their people Will be as rash in the repeale, as hasty To expell him thence. I thinke hee'l be to Rome As is the Aspray to the Fish, who takes it
[2980]
By Soueraignty of Nature. First, he was A Noble seruant to them, but he could not Carry his Honors eeuen euen : whether 'was Pride Which out of dayly Fortune euer taints The happy man; whether detect of iudgement,
[2985]
To faile in the disposing of those chances Which he was Lord of: or whether Nature, Not to be other then one thing, not moouing From th'Caske to th'Cushion: but commanding peace Euen with the same austerity and garbe,
[2990]
As he controll'd the warre. But one of these (As he hath spices of them all) not all, For I dare so farre free him, made him fear'd, So hated, and so banish'd: but he ha's a Merit To choake it in the vtt'rance: So our Vertue,
[2995]
Lie in th'interpretation of the time, And power vnto it selfe most commendable, Hath not a Tombe so euident as a Chaire T'extoll what it hath done. One fire d es out one fire; one Naile, one Naile;
[3000]
Rights by rights fouler, strengths by strengths do faile. Come let's away: when Caius Rome is thine, Thou art poor'st of all; then shortly art thou mine.
exeunt
 

Download the digital text of the play

        
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="7" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 4, Scene 7]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Auffidius with his Lieutenant.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-cor-auf">
      <speaker rend="italic">Auf.</speaker>
      <p n="2945">Do they still flye to'th'Roman?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-lie">
      <speaker rend="italic">Lieu.</speaker>
      <l n="2946">I do not know what Witchcraft's in him: but</l>
      <l n="2947">Your Soldiers vse him as the Grace 'fore meate,</l>
      <l n="2948">Their talke at Table, and their Thankes at end,</l>
      <l n="2949">And you are darkned in this action Sir,</l>
      <l n="2950">Euen by your owne.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-auf">
      <speaker rend="italic">Auf.</speaker>
      <l n="2951">I cannot helpe it now,</l>
      <l n="2952">Vnlesse by vsing meanes I lame the foote</l>
      <l n="2953">Of our designe. He beares himselfe more proudlier,</l>
      <l n="2954">Euen to my person, then I thought he would</l>
      <l n="2955">When first I did embrace him. Yet his Nature</l>
      <l n="2956">In that's no Changeling, and I must excuse</l>
      <l n="2957">What cannot be amended.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-lie">
      <speaker rend="italic">Lieu.</speaker>
      <l n="2958">Yet I wish Sir,</l>
      <l n="2959">(I meane for your particular) you had not</l>
      <l n="2960">Ioyn'd in Commission with him: but either haue borne</l>
      <l n="2961">The action of your selfe, or else to him, had left it soly.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-auf">
      <speaker rend="italic">Auf.</speaker>
      <l n="2962">I vnderstand thee well, and be thou sure</l>
      <l n="2963">When he shall come to his account, he knowes not</l>
      <l n="2964">What I can vrge against him, although it seemes</l>
      <l n="2965">And so he thinkes, and is no lesse apparant</l>
      <l n="2966">To th'vulgar eye, that he beares all things fairely:</l>
      <l n="2967">And shewes good Husbandry for the Volcian State,</l>
      <l n="2968">Fights Dragon‑like, and does atcheeue as soone</l>
      <l n="2969">As draw his Sword: yet he hath left vndone</l>
      <l n="2970">That which shall breake his necke, or hazard mine,</l>
      <l n="2971">When ere we come to our account.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-lie">
      <speaker rend="italic">Lieu.</speaker>
      <p n="2972">Sir, I beseech you, think you he'l carry Rome?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-cor-auf">
      <speaker rend="italic">Auf.</speaker>
      <l n="2973">All places yeelds to him ere he sits downe,</l>
      <l n="2974">And the Nobility of Rome are his:</l>
      <l n="2975">The Senators and Patricians loue him too:</l>
      <l n="2976">The Tribunes are no Soldiers: and their people</l>
      <l n="2977">Will be as rash in the repeale, as hasty</l>
      <l n="2978">To expell him thence. I thinke hee'l be to Rome</l>
      <l n="2979">As is the Aspray to the Fish, who takes it</l>
      <l n="2980">By Soueraignty of Nature. First, he was</l>
      <l n="2981">A Noble seruant to them, but he could not</l>
      <l n="2982">Carry his Honors<choice>
            <orig>eeuen</orig>
            <corr>euen</corr>
         </choice>: whether 'was Pride</l>
      <l n="2983">Which out of dayly Fortune euer taints</l>
      <l n="2984">The happy man; whether detect of iudgement,</l>
      <l n="2985">To faile in the disposing of those chances</l>
      <l n="2986">Which he was Lord of: or whether Nature,</l>
      <l n="2987">Not to be other then one thing, not moouing</l>
      <l n="2988">From th'Caske to th'Cushion: but commanding peace</l>
      <l n="2989">Euen with the same austerity and garbe,</l>
      <l n="2990">As he controll'd the warre. But one of these</l>
      <l n="2991">(As he hath spices of them all) not all,</l>
      <l n="2992">For I dare so farre free him, made him fear'd,</l>
      <l n="2993">So hated, and so banish'd: but he ha's a Merit</l>
      <l n="2994">To choake it in the vtt'rance: So our Vertue,</l>
      <l n="2995">Lie in th'interpretation of the time,</l>
      <l n="2996">And power vnto it selfe most commendable,</l>
      <l n="2997">Hath not a Tombe so euident as a Chaire</l>
      <l n="2998">T'extoll what it hath done.</l>
      <l n="2999">One fire d<gap extent="3"
              unit="chars"
              reason="illegible"
              agent="abrasion"
              resp="#LMC"/>es out one fire; one Naile, one Naile;</l>
      <l n="3000">Rights by rights fouler, strengths by strengths do faile.</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="3001">Come let's away: when<hi rend="italic">Caius</hi>Rome is thine,</l>
      <l n="3002">Thou art poor'st of all; then shortly art thou mine.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic inline" type="exit">exeunt</stage>
</div>

        
        

Download the XML