The Bodleian First Folio

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Reference: i1r - Histories, p. 81

Left Column


The Life of Henry the Fift.

vp with new-tuned Oathes: and what a Beard of the Ge-

neralls Cut, and a horride Sute of the Campe, will doe a-

mong foming Bottles, and Ale­washt Wits, is wonder-

[1480]

full to be thought on: but you must learne to know such

slanders of the age, or else you may be maruellously mi-

stooke.

Flu.

I tell you what, Captaine Gower: I doe perceiue

hee is not the man that hee would gladly make shew to

[1485]

the World hee is: if I finde a hole in his Coat, I will tell

him my minde: hearke you, the King is comming, and I

must speake with him from the Pridge.

Drum and Colours. Enter the King and his poore Souldiers. Flu.

God plesse your Maiestie.

King.

How now Fluellen, cam'st thou from the Bridge?

Flu.
[1490]

I, so please your Maiestie: The Duke of Exeter

ha's very gallantly maintain'd the Pridge; the French is

gone off, looke you, and there is gallant and most praue

passages: marry, th'athuersarie was haue possession of

the Pridge, but he is enforced to retyre, and the Duke of

[1495]

Exeter is Master of the Pridge: I can tell your Maiestie,

the Duke is a praue man.

King.

What men haue you lost, Fluellen?

Flu.

The perdition of th'athuersarie hath beene very

great, reasonnable great: marry for my part, I thinke the

[1500]

Duke hath lost neuer a man, but one that is like to be exe-

cuted for robbing a Church, one Bardolph, if your Maie-

stie know the man: his face is all bubukles and whelkes,

and knobs, and flames a fire, and his lippes blowes at his

nose, and it is like a coale of fire, sometimes plew, and

[1505]

sometimes red, but his nose is executed, and his fire's

out.

King.

Wee would haue all such offendors so cut off:

and we giue expresse charge, that in our Marches through

the Countrey, there be nothing compell'd from the Vil-

[1510]

lages; nothing taken, but pay'd for: none of the French

vpbrayded or abused in disdainefull Language; for when

Leuitie and Crueltie play for a Kingdome, the gentler

Gamester is the soonest winner.

Tucket. Enter Mountioy. Mountioy.

You know me by my habit.

King.
[1515]

Well then, I know thee: what shall I know of

thee?

Mountioy.

My Masters mind.

King.

Vnfold it.

Mountioy.

Thus sayes my King: Say thou to Harry

[1520]

of England, Though we seem'd dead, we did but sleepe:

Aduantage is a better Souldier then rashnesse. Tell him,

wee could haue rebuk'd him at Harflewe, but that wee

thought not good to bruise an iniurie, till it were full

ripe. Now wee speake vpon our Q. and our voyce is im-

[1525]

periall; England shall repent his folly, see his weake-

nesse, and admire our sufferance. Bid him therefore con-

sider of his ransome, which must proportion the losses we

haue borne, the subiects we haue lost, the disgrace we

haue digested; which in weight to re-answer, his petti-

[1530]

nesse would bow vnder. For our losses, his Exchequer is

too poore; for th'effusion of our bloud, the Muster of his

Kingdome too faint a number; and for our disgrace, his

owne person kneeling at our feet, but a weake and worth-

lesse satisfaction. To this adde defiance: and tell him for

[1535]

conclusion, he hath betrayed his followers, whose con-

demnation is pronounc't: So farre my King and Master;

so much my Office.

Image


[full image]

Right Column


King. What is thy name? I know thy qualitie. Mount.

Mountioy.

King.
[1540]
Thou doo'st thy Office fairely. Turne thee back, And tell thy King, I doe not seeke him now, But could be willing to march on to Callice, Without impeachment: for to say the sooth, Though 'tis no wisdome to confesse so much
[1545]
Vnto an enemie of Craft and Vantage, My people are with sicknesse much enfeebled, My numbers lessen'd: and those few I haue, Almost no better then so many French; Who when they were in health, I tell thee Herald,
[1550]
I thought, vpon one payre of English Legges Did march three Frenchmen. Yet forgiue me God, That I doe bragge thus; this your ayre of France Hath blowne that vice in me. I must repent: Goe therefore tell thy Master, heere I am;
[1555]
My Ransome, is this frayle and worthlesse Trunke; My Army, but a weake and sickly Guard: Yet God before, tell him we will come on, Though France himselfe, and such another Neighbor Stand in our way. There's for thy labour Mountioy.
[1560]
Goe bid thy Master well aduise himselfe. If we may passe, we will: if we be hindred, We shall your tawnie ground with your red blood Discolour: and so Mountioy, fare you well. The summe of all our Answer is but this:
[1565]
We would not seeke a Battaile as we are, Nor as we are, we say we will not shun it: So tell your Master.
Mount.

I shall deliuer so: Thankes to your High-

nesse.

Glouc.
[1570]

I hope they will not come vpon vs now.

King. We are in Gods hand, Brother, not in theirs: March to the Bridge, it now drawes toward night, Beyond the Riuer wee'le encampe our selues, And on to morrow bid them march away. Exeunt.
[Act 3, Scene 7] Enter the Constable of France, the Lord Ramburs, Orleance, Dolphin, with others. Const.
[1575]

Tut, I haue the beft Armour of the World:

would it were day.

Orleance.

You haue an excellent Armour: but let my

Horse haue his due.

Const.

It is the best Horse of Europe.

Orleance.
[1580]

Will it neuer be Morning?

Dolph.

My Lord of Orleance, and my Lord High Con-

stable, you talke of Horse and Armour?

Orleance. You are as well prouided of both, as any Prince in the World. Dolph.
[1585]

What a long Night is this? I will not change

my Horse with any that treades but on foure postures:

ch' ha: he bounds from the Earth, as if his entrayles were

hayres: le Cheual volante, the Pegasus, ches les narines de feu . When I bestryde him, I soare, I am a Hawke: he trots

[1590]

the ayre: the Earth sings, when he touches it: the basest

horne of his hoofe, is more Musicall then the Pipe of

Hermes.

Orleance.

Hee's of the colour of the Nutmeg.

Dolph.

And of the heat of the Ginger. It is a Beast

[1595]

for Perseus: hee is pure Ayre and Fire; and the dull Ele-

ments of Earth and Water neuer appeare in him, but on-

ly in patient stillnesse while his Rider mounts him: hee

is indeede a Horse, and all other Iades you may call

Beasts.

i Const. In-

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[Act 3, Scene 7] Enter the Constable of France, the Lord Ramburs, Orleance, Dolphin, with others. Const.
[1575]

Tut, I haue the beft Armour of the World:

would it were day.

Orleance.

You haue an excellent Armour: but let my

Horse haue his due.

Const.

It is the best Horse of Europe.

Orleance.
[1580]

Will it neuer be Morning?

Dolph.

My Lord of Orleance, and my Lord High Con-

stable, you talke of Horse and Armour?

Orleance. You are as well prouided of both, as any Prince in the World. Dolph.
[1585]

What a long Night is this? I will not change

my Horse with any that treades but on foure postures:

ch' ha: he bounds from the Earth, as if his entrayles were

hayres: le Cheual volante, the Pegasus, ches les narines de feu . When I bestryde him, I soare, I am a Hawke: he trots

[1590]

the ayre: the Earth sings, when he touches it: the basest

horne of his hoofe, is more Musicall then the Pipe of

Hermes.

Orleance.

Hee's of the colour of the Nutmeg.

Dolph.

And of the heat of the Ginger. It is a Beast

[1595]

for Perseus: hee is pure Ayre and Fire; and the dull Ele-

ments of Earth and Water neuer appeare in him, but on-

ly in patient stillnesse while his Rider mounts him: hee

is indeede a Horse, and all other Iades you may call

Beasts.

Const.
[1600]

Indeed my Lord, it is a most absolute and ex-

cellent Horse.

Dolph.

It is the Prince of Palfrayes, his Neigh is like

the bidding of a Monarch, and his countenance enforces

Homage.

Orleance.
[1605]

No more Cousin.

Dolph.

Nay, the man hath no wit, that cannot from

the rising of the Larke to the lodging of the Lambe,

varie deserued prayse on my Palfray: it is a Theame as

fluent as the Sea: Turne the Sands into eloquent tongues,

[1610]

and my Horse is argument for them all: 'tis a subiect

for a Soueraigne to reason on, and for a Soueraignes So-

ueraigne to ride on: And for the World, familiar to vs,

and vnknowne, to lay apart their particular Functions,

and wonder at him, I once writ a Sonnet in his prayse,

[1615]

and began thus, Wonder of Nature.

Orleance.

I haue heard a Sonnet begin so to ones Mi-

stresse.

Dolph.

Then did they imitate that which I compos'd

to my Courser, for my Horse is my Mistresse.

Orleance.
[1620]

Your Mistresse beares well.

Dolph.

Me well, which is the prescript prayse and per-

fection of a good and particular Mistresse.

Const.

Nay, for me thought yesterday your Mistresse

shrewdly shooke your back.

Dolph.
[1625]
So perhaps did yours.
Const. Mine was not bridled. Dolph.

O then belike she was old and gentle, and you

rode like a Kerne of Ireland, your French Hose off, and in

your strait Strossers.

Const.
[1630]

You haue good iudgement in Horseman-

ship.

Dolph.

Be warn'd by me then: they that ride so, and

ride not warily, fall into foule Boggs: I had rather haue

my Horse to my Mistresse.

Const.
[1635]
I had as liue haue my Mistresse a Iade.
Dolph.

I tell thee Constable, my Mistresse weares his

owne hayre.

Const.

I could make as true a boast as that, if I had a

Sow to my Mistresse.

Dolph.
[1640]

Le chien est retourne a son propre vemissement est la leuye lauee au bourbier : thou mak'st vse of any thing.

Const.

Yet doe I not vse my Horse for my Mistresse,

or any such Prouerbe, so little kin to the purpose.

Ramb.

My Lord Constable, the Armour that I saw in

[1645]

your Tent to night, are those Starres or Sunnes vpon it?

Const.

Starres my Lord.

Dolph.

Some of them will fall to morrow, I hope.

Const. And yet my Sky shall not want. Dolph.

That may be, for you beare a many superflu-

[1650]

ously, and 'twere more honor some were away.

Const.

Eu'n as your Horse beares your prayses, who

would trot as well, were some of your bragges dismount-

ted.

Dolph.

Would I were able to loade him with his de-

[1655]

sert. Will it neuer be day? I will trot to morrow a mile,

and my way shall be paued with English Faces.

Const.

I will not say so, for feare I should be fac't out

of my way: but I would it were morning, for I would

faine be about the eares of the English.

Ramb.
[1660]

Who will goe to Hazard with me for twentie

Prisoners?

Const.

You must first goe your selfe to hazard, ere you

haue them.

Dolph.

'Tis Mid-night, Ile goe arme my selfe.

Exit.
Orleance.
[1665]

The Dolphin longs for morning.

Ramb. He longs to eate the English. Const.

I thinke he will eate all he kills.

Orleance.

By the white Hand of my Lady, hee's a gal-

lant Prince.

Const.
[1670]

Sweare by her Foot, that she may tread out the

Oath.

Orleance.

He is simply the most actiue Gentleman of

France.

Const.

Doing is actiuitie, and he will still be doing.

Orleance.
[1675]
He neuer did harme, that I heard of.
Const.

Nor will doe none to morrow: hee will keepe

that good name still.

Orleance. I know him to be valiant. Const.

I was told that, by one that knowes him better

[1680]

then you.

Orleance.

What's hee?

Const.

Marry hee told me so himselfe, and hee sayd hee

car'd not who knew it.

Orleance.

Hee needes not, it is no hidden vertue in

[1685]

him.

Const.

By my faith Sir, but it is: neuer any body saw

it, but his Lacquey: 'tis a hooded valour, and when it

appeares, it will bate.

Orleance. Ill will neuer sayd well. Const.
[1690]

I will cap that Prouerbe with, There is flatterie

in friendship.

Orleance.

And I will take vp that with, Giue the Deuill

his due.

Const.

Well plac't: there stands your friend for the

[1695]

Deuill: haue at the very eye of that Prouerbe with, A

Pox of the Deuill.

Orleance.

You are the better at Prouerbs, by how much

a Fooles Bolt is soone shot.

Const. You haue shot ouer. Orleance.
[1700]

'Tis not the first time you were ouer-shot.

Enter a Messenger. Mess.

My Lord high Constable, the English lye within

fifteene hundred paces of your Tents.

Const.

Who hath measur'd the ground?

Mess.

The Lord Grandpree.

Const.
[1705]

A valiant and most expert Gentleman. Would

it were day? Alas poore Harry of England: hee longs

not for the Dawning, as wee doe.

Orleance.

What a wretched and peeuish fellow is this

King of England, to mope with his fat-brain'd followers

[1710]

so farre out of his knowledge.

Const.

If the English had any apprehension, they

would runne away.

Orleance.

That they lack: for if their heads had any in-

tellectuall Armour, they could neuer weare such heauie

[1715]

Head-pieces.

Ramb.

That Iland of England breedes very valiant

Creatures; their Mastiffes are of vnmatchable cou­

rage.

Orleance.

Foolish Curres, that runne winking into

[1720]

the mouth of a Russian Beare, and haue their heads crusht

like rotten Apples: you may as well say, that's a valiant

Flea, that dare eate his breakefast on the Lippe of a

Lyon.

Const.

Iust, iust: and the men doe sympathize with

[1725]

the Mastiffes, in robustious and rough comming on,

leauing their Wits with their Wiues: and then giue

them great Meales of Beefe, and Iron and Steele; they

will eate like Wolues, and fight like Deuils.

Orleance.

I, but these English are shrowdly out of

[1730]

Beefe.

Const.

Then shall we finde to morrow, they haue only

stomackes to eate, and none to fight. Now is it time to

arme: come, shall we about it?

Orleance.

It is now two a Clock: but let me see, by ten

[1735]

Wee shall haue each a hundred English men.

Exeunt.
 

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<div type="scene" n="7" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 7]</head>
   <stage rend="italic centre" type="entrance">Enter the Constable of France, the Lord Ramburs,
      <lb/>Orleance, Dolphin, with others.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1575">Tut, I haue the beft Armour of the World:
      <lb n="1576"/>would it were day.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1577">You haue an excellent Armour: but let my
      <lb n="1578"/>Horse haue his due.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1579">It is the best Horse of Europe.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1580">Will it neuer be Morning?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1581">My Lord of Orleance, and my Lord High Con-
      <lb n="1582"/>stable, you talke of Horse and Armour?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <l n="1583">You are as well prouided of both, as any</l>
      <l n="1584">Prince in the World.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1585">What a long Night is this? I will not change
      <lb n="1586"/>my Horse with any that treades but on foure postures:
      <lb n="1587"/>ch' ha: he bounds from the Earth, as if his entrayles were
      <lb n="1588"/>hayres:<hi rend="italic">le Cheual volante</hi>, the Pegasus,<hi rend="italic">ches les narines de
      <lb n="1589"/>feu</hi>. When I bestryde him, I soare, I am a Hawke: he trots
      <lb n="1590"/>the ayre: the Earth sings, when he touches it: the basest
      <lb n="1591"/>horne of his hoofe, is more Musicall then the Pipe of
      <lb n="1592"/>
         <hi rend="italic">Hermes</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1593">Hee's of the colour of the Nutmeg.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1594">And of the heat of the Ginger. It is a Beast
      <lb n="1595"/>for<hi rend="italic">Perseus</hi>: hee is pure Ayre and Fire; and the dull Ele-
      <lb n="1596"/>ments of Earth and Water neuer appeare in him, but on-
      <lb n="1597"/>ly in patient stillnesse while his Rider mounts him: hee
      <lb n="1598"/>is indeede a Horse, and all other Iades you may call
      <lb n="1599"/>Beasts.</p>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0438-0.jpg" n="82"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1600">Indeed my Lord, it is a most absolute and ex-
      <lb n="1601"/>cellent Horse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1602">It is the Prince of Palfrayes, his Neigh is like
      <lb n="1603"/>the bidding of a Monarch, and his countenance enforces
      <lb n="1604"/>Homage.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1605">No more Cousin.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1606">Nay, the man hath no wit, that cannot from
      <lb n="1607"/>the rising of the Larke to the lodging of the Lambe,
      <lb n="1608"/>varie deserued prayse on my Palfray: it is a Theame as
      <lb n="1609"/>fluent as the Sea: Turne the Sands into eloquent tongues,
      <lb n="1610"/>and my Horse is argument for them all: 'tis a subiect
      <lb n="1611"/>for a Soueraigne to reason on, and for a Soueraignes So-
      <lb n="1612"/>ueraigne to ride on: And for the World, familiar to vs,
      <lb n="1613"/>and vnknowne, to lay apart their particular Functions,
      <lb n="1614"/>and wonder at him, I once writ a Sonnet in his prayse,
      <lb n="1615"/>and began thus,<hi rend="italic">Wonder of Nature</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1616">I haue heard a Sonnet begin so to ones Mi-
      <lb n="1617"/>stresse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1618">Then did they imitate that which I compos'd
      <lb n="1619"/>to my Courser, for my Horse is my Mistresse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1620">Your Mistresse beares well.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1621">Me well, which is the prescript prayse and per-
      <lb n="1622"/>fection of a good and particular Mistresse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1623">Nay, for me thought yesterday your Mistresse
      <lb n="1624"/>shrewdly shooke your back.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <l n="1625">So perhaps did yours.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <l n="1626">Mine was not bridled.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1627">O then belike she was old and gentle, and you
      <lb n="1628"/>rode like a Kerne of Ireland, your French Hose off, and in
      <lb n="1629"/>your strait Strossers.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1630">You haue good iudgement in Horseman-
      <lb n="1631"/>ship.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1632">Be warn'd by me then: they that ride so, and
      <lb n="1633"/>ride not warily, fall into foule Boggs: I had rather haue
      <lb n="1634"/>my Horse to my Mistresse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <l n="1635">I had as liue haue my Mistresse a Iade.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1636">I tell thee Constable, my Mistresse weares his
      <lb n="1637"/>owne hayre.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1638">I could make as true a boast as that, if I had a
      <lb n="1639"/>Sow to my Mistresse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1640">
         <hi rend="italic">Le chien est retourne a son propre vemissement est
      <lb n="1641"/>la leuye lauee au bourbier</hi>: thou mak'st vse of any thing.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1642">Yet doe I not vse my Horse for my Mistresse,
      <lb n="1643"/>or any such Prouerbe, so little kin to the purpose.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-ram">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ramb.</speaker>
      <p n="1644">My Lord Constable, the Armour that I saw in
      <lb n="1645"/>your Tent to night, are those Starres or Sunnes vpon it?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1646">Starres my Lord.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1647">Some of them will fall to morrow, I hope.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <l n="1648">And yet my Sky shall not want.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1649">That may be, for you beare a many superflu-
      <lb n="1650"/>ously, and 'twere more honor some were away.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1651">Eu'n as your Horse beares your prayses, who
      <lb n="1652"/>would trot as well, were some of your bragges dismount-
      <lb n="1653"/>ted.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1654">Would I were able to loade him with his de-
      <lb n="1655"/>sert. Will it neuer be day? I will trot to morrow a mile,
      <lb n="1656"/>and my way shall be paued with English Faces.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1657">I will not say so, for feare I should be fac't out
      <lb n="1658"/>of my way: but I would it were morning, for I would
      <lb n="1659"/>faine be about the eares of the English.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-ram">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ramb.</speaker>
      <p n="1660">Who will goe to Hazard with me for twentie
      <lb n="1661"/>Prisoners?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1662">You must first goe your selfe to hazard, ere you
      <lb n="1663"/>haue them.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-lew">
      <speaker rend="italic">Dolph.</speaker>
      <p n="1664">'Tis Mid-night, Ile goe arme my selfe.</p>
      <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1665">The Dolphin longs for morning.</p>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-h5-ram">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ramb.</speaker>
      <l n="1666">He longs to eate the English.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1667">I thinke he will eate all he kills.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1668">By the white Hand of my Lady, hee's a gal-
      <lb n="1669"/>lant Prince.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1670">Sweare by her Foot, that she may tread out the
      <lb n="1671"/>Oath.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1672">He is simply the most actiue Gentleman of
      <lb n="1673"/>France.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1674">Doing is actiuitie, and he will still be doing.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <l n="1675">He neuer did harme, that I heard of.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1676">Nor will doe none to morrow: hee will keepe
      <lb n="1677"/>that good name still.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <l n="1678">I know him to be valiant.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1679">I was told that, by one that knowes him better
      <lb n="1680"/>then you.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1681">What's hee?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1682">Marry hee told me so himselfe, and hee sayd hee
      <lb n="1683"/>car'd not who knew it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1684">Hee needes not, it is no hidden vertue in
      <lb n="1685"/>him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1686">By my faith Sir, but it is: neuer any body saw
      <lb n="1687"/>it, but his Lacquey: 'tis a hooded valour, and when it
      <lb n="1688"/>appeares, it will bate.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <l n="1689">Ill will neuer sayd well.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1690">I will cap that Prouerbe with, There is flatterie
      <lb n="1691"/>in friendship.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1692">And I will take vp that with, Giue the Deuill
      <lb n="1693"/>his due.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1694">Well plac't: there stands your friend for the
      <lb n="1695"/>Deuill: haue at the very eye of that Prouerbe with, A
      <lb n="1696"/>Pox of the Deuill.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1697">You are the better at Prouerbs, by how much
      <lb n="1698"/>a Fooles Bolt is soone shot.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <l n="1699">You haue shot ouer.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1700">'Tis not the first time you were ouer-shot.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic centre" type="entrance">Enter a Messenger.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-h5-mes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mess.</speaker>
      <p n="1701">My Lord high Constable, the English lye within
      <lb n="1702"/>fifteene hundred paces of your Tents.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1703">Who hath measur'd the ground?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-mes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mess.</speaker>
      <p n="1704">The Lord<hi rend="italic">Grandpree</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1705">A valiant and most expert Gentleman. Would
      <lb n="1706"/>it were day? Alas poore<hi rend="italic">Harry</hi>of England: hee longs
      <lb n="1707"/>not for the Dawning, as wee doe.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1708">What a wretched and peeuish fellow is this
      <lb n="1709"/>King of England, to mope with his fat-brain'd followers
      <lb n="1710"/>so farre out of his knowledge.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1711">If the English had any apprehension, they
      <lb n="1712"/>would runne away.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1713">That they lack: for if their heads had any in-
      <lb n="1714"/>tellectuall Armour, they could neuer weare such heauie
      <lb n="1715"/>Head-pieces.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-ram">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ramb.</speaker>
      <p n="1716">That Iland of England breedes very valiant
      <lb n="1717"/>Creatures; their Mastiffes are of vnmatchable cou­
      <lb n="1718"/>rage.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1719">Foolish Curres, that runne winking into
      <lb n="1720"/>the mouth of a Russian Beare, and haue their heads crusht
      <lb n="1721"/>like rotten Apples: you may as well say, that's a valiant
      <lb n="1722"/>Flea, that dare eate his breakefast on the Lippe of a
      <lb n="1723"/>Lyon.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1724">Iust, iust: and the men doe sympathize with
      <lb n="1725"/>the Mastiffes, in robustious and rough comming on,
      <lb n="1726"/>leauing their Wits with their Wiues: and then giue
      <lb n="1727"/>them great Meales of Beefe, and Iron and Steele; they
      <lb n="1728"/>will eate like Wolues, and fight like Deuils.</p>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0439-0.jpg" n="83"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1729">I, but these English are shrowdly out of
      <lb n="1730"/>Beefe.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-con">
      <speaker rend="italic">Const.</speaker>
      <p n="1731">Then shall we finde to morrow, they haue only
      <lb n="1732"/>stomackes to eate, and none to fight. Now is it time to
      <lb n="1733"/>arme: come, shall we about it?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-h5-orl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Orleance.</speaker>
      <p n="1734">It is now two a Clock: but let me see, by ten
      <lb n="1735"/>Wee shall haue each a hundred English men.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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