The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: h1r - Histories, p. 69

Left Column


The Life of Henry the Fift.
[Prologue] Enter Prologue. O For a Muse of Fire, that would ascend The brightest Heauen of Inuention: A Kingdome for a Stage, Princes to Act, And Monarchs to behold the swelling Scene.
[5]
Then should the Warlike Harry, like himselfe, Assume the Port of Mars , and at his heeles (Leasht in, like Hounds) should Famine, Sword, and Fire Crouch for employment. But pardon, Gentles all: The flat vnraysed Spirits, that hath dar'd,
[10]
On this vnworthy Scaffold, to bring forth So great an Obiect Can this Cock-Pit hold The vastie fields of France? Or may we cramme Within this Woodden O. the very Caskes That did affright the Ayre at Agincourt?
[15]
O pardon: since a crooked Figure may Attest in little place a Million, And let vs, Cyphers to this great Accompt,

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Right Column


On your imaginarie Forces worke. Suppose within the Girdle of these Walls
[20]
Are now confin'd two mightie Monarchies, Whose high, vp-reared, and abutting Fronts, The perillous narrow Ocean parts asunder. Peece out our imperfections with your thoughts: Into a thousand parts diuide one Man,
[25]
And make imaginarie Puissance. Thinke when we talke of Horses, that you see them Printing their prowd Hoofes i'th' receiuing Earth: For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our Kings, Carry them here and there: Iumping o're Times;
[30]
Turning th'accomplishment of many yeeres Into an Howre-glasse: for the which supplie Admit me Chorus to this Historie; Who Prologue-like, your humble patience pray, Gently to heare, kindly to iudge our Play. Exit.
Actus Primus. Scœna Prima [Act 1, Scene 1] Enter the two Bishops of Canterbury and Ely. Bish. Cant.
[35]
MY Lord, Ile tell you, that selfe Bill is vrg'd, Which in th'eleuēth th'eleuenth yere of y e last Kings reign Was like, and had indeed against vs past, But that the scambling and vnquiet time Did push it out of farther question.
Bish. Ely.
[40]
But how my Lord shall we resist it now?
Bish. Cant. It must be thought on: if it passe against vs, We loose the better halfe of our Possession: For all the Temporall Lands, which men deuout By Testament haue giuen to the Church,
[45]
Would they strip from vs; being valu'd thus, As much as would maintaine, to the Kings honor, Full fifteene Earles, and fifteene hundred Knights, Six thousand and two hundred good Esquires: And to reliefe of Lazars, and weake age
[50]
Of indigent faint Soules, past corporall toyle, A hundred Almes-houses, right well supply'd: And to the Coffers of the King beside, A thousand pounds by th'yeere Thus runs the Bill.
Bish. Ely. This would drinke deepe. Bish. Cant.
[55]
'Twould drinke the Cup and all.
Bish. Ely. But what preuention? Bish. Cant. The King is full of grace, and faire re- gard. Bish. Ely. And a true louer of the holy Church. Bish. Cant. The courses of his youth promis'd it not.
[60]
The breath no sooner left his Fathers body, But that his wildnesse, mortify'd in him, Seem'd to dye too: yea, at that very moment, Consideration like an Angell came, And whipt th'offending Adam out of him;
[65]
Leauing his body as a Paradise, T'inuelop and containe Celestiall Spirits. Neuer was such a sodaine Scholler made: Neuer came Reformation in a Flood, With such a heady currance scowring faults:
[70]
Nor neuer Hidra-headed Wilfulnesse So soone did loose his Seat; and all at once; As in this King.
Bish. Ely. We are blessed in the Change. Bish. Cant. Heare him but reason in Diuinitie;
[75]
And all-admiring, with an inward wish You would desire the King were made a Prelate: Heare him debate of Common-wealth Affaires; You would say, it hath been all in all his study: List his discourse of Warre; and you shall heare
[80]
A fearefull Battaile rendred you in Musique. h Turn

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[Prologue] Enter Prologue. O For a Muse of Fire, that would ascend The brightest Heauen of Inuention: A Kingdome for a Stage, Princes to Act, And Monarchs to behold the swelling Scene.
[5]
Then should the Warlike Harry, like himselfe, Assume the Port of Mars , and at his heeles (Leasht in, like Hounds) should Famine, Sword, and Fire Crouch for employment. But pardon, Gentles all: The flat vnraysed Spirits, that hath dar'd,
[10]
On this vnworthy Scaffold, to bring forth So great an Obiect Can this Cock-Pit hold The vastie fields of France? Or may we cramme Within this Woodden O. the very Caskes That did affright the Ayre at Agincourt?
[15]
O pardon: since a crooked Figure may Attest in little place a Million, And let vs, Cyphers to this great Accompt, On your imaginarie Forces worke. Suppose within the Girdle of these Walls
[20]
Are now confin'd two mightie Monarchies, Whose high, vp-reared, and abutting Fronts, The perillous narrow Ocean parts asunder. Peece out our imperfections with your thoughts: Into a thousand parts diuide one Man,
[25]
And make imaginarie Puissance. Thinke when we talke of Horses, that you see them Printing their prowd Hoofes i'th' receiuing Earth: For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our Kings, Carry them here and there: Iumping o're Times;
[30]
Turning th'accomplishment of many yeeres Into an Howre-glasse: for the which supplie Admit me Chorus to this Historie; Who Prologue-like, your humble patience pray, Gently to heare, kindly to iudge our Play. Exit.
 

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   <head type="supplied">[Prologue]</head>
   <stage rend="italic centre" type="entrance">Enter Prologue.</stage>
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         <hi rend="italic">For a Muse of Fire, that would ascend</hi>
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      <l rend="italic" n="4">And Monarchs to behold the swelling Scene.</l>
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         <hi rend="italic">Then should the Warlike</hi>Harry,<hi rend="italic">like himselfe,</hi>
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         <hi rend="italic">Assume the Port of</hi>Mars<hi rend="italic">, and at his heeles</hi>
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      <l rend="italic" n="7">(Leasht in, like Hounds) should Famine, Sword, and Fire</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="8">Crouch for employment. But pardon, Gentles all:</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="9">The flat vnraysed Spirits, that hath dar'd,</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="10">On this vnworthy Scaffold, to bring forth</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="11">So great an Obiect Can this Cock-Pit hold</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="12">The vastie fields of France? Or may we cramme</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="13">Within this Woodden O. the very Caskes</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="14">That did affright the Ayre at Agincourt?</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="15">O pardon: since a crooked Figure may</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="16">Attest in little place a Million,</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="17">And let vs, Cyphers to this great Accompt,</l>
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      <l rend="italic" n="18">On your imaginarie Forces worke.</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="19">Suppose within the Girdle of these Walls</l>
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      <l rend="italic" n="22">The perillous narrow Ocean parts asunder.</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="23">Peece out our imperfections with your thoughts:</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="24">Into a thousand parts diuide one Man,</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="25">And make imaginarie Puissance.</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="26">Thinke when we talke of Horses, that you see them</l>
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      <l rend="italic" n="28">For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our Kings,</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="29">Carry them here and there: Iumping o're Times;</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="30">Turning th'accomplishment of many yeeres</l>
      <l rend="italic" n="31">Into an Howre-glasse: for the which supplie</l>
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         <hi rend="italic">Admit me</hi>Chorus<hi rend="italic">to this Historie;</hi>
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      <l rend="italic" n="33">Who Prologue-like, your humble patience pray,</l>
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      <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
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