The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: kk4v - Tragedies, p. 116

Left Column


The Tragedie of Iulius Cæsar. Which busie care drawes, in the braines of men; Therefore thou sleep'st so sound. Enter Portia. Por. Brutus, my Lord. Bru. Portia: What meane you? wherfore rise you now?
[835]
It is not for your health, thus to commit Your weake condition, to the raw cold morning.
Por. Nor for yours neither. Y'haue vngently Brutus Stole from my bed: and yesternight at Supper You sodainly arose, and walk'd about,
[840]
Musing, and sighing, with your armes a‑crosse And when I ask'd you what the matter was, You star'd vpon me, with vngentle lookes. I vrg'd you further, then you scratch'd your head, And too impatiently stampt with your foote:
[845]
Yet I insisted, yet you answer'd not, But with an angry wafter of your hand Gaue signe for me to leaue you: So I did, Fearing to strengthen that impatience Which seem'd too much inkindled; and withall,
[850]
Hoping it was but an effect of Humor, Which sometime hath his houre with euery man. It will not let you eate, nor talke, nor sleepe; And could it worke so much vpon your shape, As it hath much preuayl'd on your Condltion Condition ,
[855]
I should not know you Brutus. Deare my Lord, Make me acquainted with your cause of greefe.
Bru. I am not well in health, and that is all. Por. Brutus is wise, and were he not in health, He would embrace the meanes to come by it. Bru.
[860]
Why so I do: good Portia go to bed.
Por. Is Brutus sicke? And is it Physicall To walke vnbraced, and sucke vp the humours Of the danke Morning? What, is Brutus sicke? And will he steale out of his wholsome bed
[865]
To dare the vile contagion of the Night? And tempt the Rhewmy, and vnpurged Ayre, To adde vnto hit his sicknesse? No my Brutus, You haue some sicke Offence within your minde, Which by the Right and Vertue of my place
[870]
I ought to know of: And vpon my knees, I charme you, by my once commended Beauty, By all your vowes of Loue, and that great Vow Which did incorporate and make vs one, That you vnfold to me, your selfe; your halfe
[875]
Why you are heauy: and what men to night Haue had resort to you: for heere haue beene Some sixe or seuen, who did hide their faces Euen from darknesse.
Bru. Kneele not gentle Portia. Por.
[880]
I should not neede, if you were gentle Brutus. Within tho the Bond of Marriage, tell me Brutus, Is it excepted, I should know no Secrets That appertaine to you? Am I your Selfe, But as it were in sort, or limitation?
[885]
To keepe with you at Meales, comfort your Bed, And talke to you sometimes? Dwell I but in the Suburbs Of your good pleasure? If it be no more, Portia is Brutus Harlot, not his Wife.
Bru. You are my true and honourable Wife,
[890]
As deere to me, as are the ruddy droppes That visit my sad heart.
Por. If this were true, then should I know this secret. I graunt I am a Woman; but withall, A Woman that Lord Brutus tooke to Wife:
[895]
I graunt I am a Woman; but withall,

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Right Column


A Woman well reputed: Cato's Daughter. Thinke you, I am no stronger then my Sex Being so Father'd, and so Husbanded? Tell me your Counsels, I will not disclose 'em:
[900]
I haue made strong proofe of my Constancie, Giuing my selfe a voluntary wound Heere, in the Thigh: Can I be e that with patience, And not my Husbands Secrets?
Bru. O ye Gods!
[905]
Render me worthy of this Noble Wife. Knocke. Harke, harke, one knockes: Portia go in a while, And by and by thy bosome shall partake The secrets of my Heart. All my engagements, I will construe to thee,
[910]
All the Charractery of my sad browes: Leaue me with hast. Exit Portia. Enter Lucius and Ligarius. Lucius,who's that knockes.
Luc. Heere is a sicke man that would speak with you. Bru. Caius Ligarius, that Metellus spake of.
[915]
Boy, stand aside. Caius Ligarius, how?
Cai. Vouchsafe good morrow from a feeble tongue. Bru. O what a time haue you chose out braue Caius To weare a Kerchiefe? Would you were not sicke. Cai. I am not sicke, if Brutus haue in hand
[920]
Any exploit worthy the name of Honor.
Bru. Such an exploit haue I in hand Ligarius, Had you a healthfull eare to heare of it. Cai. By all the Gods that Romans bow before, I heere discard my sicknesse. Soule of Rome,
[925]
Braue Sonne, deriu'd from Honourable Loines, Thou like an Exorcist, hast coniur'd vp My mortified Spirit. Now bid me runne, And I will striue with things impossible, Yea get the better of them. What's to do?
Bru.
[930]
A peece of worke, That will make sicke men whole.
Cai. But are not some whole, that we must make sicke? Bru. That must we also. What it is my Caius, I shall vnfold to thee, as we are going,
[935]
To whom it must be done.
Cai. Set on your foote, And with a heart new‑fir'd, I follow you, To do I know not what: but it sufficeth That Brutus leads me on. Thunder. Bru.
[940]
Follow me then.
Exeunt
[Act 2, Scene 2] Thunder & Lightning, Enter Iulius Cæsar in his Night‑gowne. Cæsar. Nor Heauen, nor Earth, Haue beene at peace to night: Thrice hath Calphurnia, in her sleepe cryed out, Helpe, ho: They murther Cæsar. Who's within? Enter a Seruant. Ser.
[945]
My Lord.
Cæs. Go bid the Priests do present Sacrifice, And bring me their opinions of Successe. Ser. I will my Lord. Exit Enter Calphurnia. Cal. What mean you Cæsar? Think you to walk forth?
[950]
You shall not stirre out of your house to day.
Cæs. Cæsar shall forth; the things that threaten'd me, Ne're look'd but on my backe: When they shall see The face of Cæsar, they are vanished. Calp.

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[Act 2, Scene 2] Thunder & Lightning, Enter Iulius Cæsar in his Night‑gowne. Cæsar. Nor Heauen, nor Earth, Haue beene at peace to night: Thrice hath Calphurnia, in her sleepe cryed out, Helpe, ho: They murther Cæsar. Who's within? Enter a Seruant. Ser.
[945]
My Lord.
Cæs. Go bid the Priests do present Sacrifice, And bring me their opinions of Successe. Ser. I will my Lord. Exit Enter Calphurnia. Cal. What mean you Cæsar? Think you to walk forth?
[950]
You shall not stirre out of your house to day.
Cæs. Cæsar shall forth; the things that threaten'd me, Ne're look'd but on my backe: When they shall see The face of Cæsar, they are vanished. Calp. Cæsar, I neuer stood on Ceremonies,
[955]
Yet now they fright me: There is one within, Besides the things that we haue heard and seene, Recounts most horrid sights seene by the Watch. A Lionnesse hath whelped in the streets, And Graues haue yawn'd, and yeelded vp their dead;
[960]
Fierce fiery Warriours fight vpon the Clouds In Rankes and Squadrons, and right forme of Warre Which drizel'd blood vpon the Capitoll: The noise of Battell hurtled in the Ayre: Horsses do neigh, and dying men did grone,
[965]
And Ghosts did shrieke and squeale about the streets. O Cæsar, these things are beyond all vse, And I do feare them.
Cæs. What can be auoyded Whose end is purpos'd by the mighty Gods?
[970]
Yet Cæsar shall go forth: for these Predictions Are to the world in generall, as to Cæsar.
Calp. When Beggers dye, there are no Comets seen, The Heauens themselues blaze forth the death of Princes Caes. Cowards dye many times before their deaths,
[975]
The valiant neuer taste of death but once: Of all the Wonders that I yet haue heard, It seemes to me most strange that men should feare, Seeing that death, a necessary end Will come, when it will come. Enter a Seruant.
[980]
What say the Augurers?
Ser. They would not haue you to stirre forth to day. Plucking the intrailes of an Offering forth, They could not finde a heart within the beast. Cæs. The Gods do this in shame of Cowardice:
[985]
Cæsar should be a Beast without a heart If he should stay at home to day for feare: No Cæsar shall not; Danger knowes full well That Cæsar is more dangerous then he. We heare two Lyons litter'd in one day,
[990]
And I the elder and more terrible, And Cæsar shall go foorth.
Calp. Alas my Lord, Your wisedome is consum'd in confidence: Do not go forth to day: Call it my feare,
[995]
That keepes you in the house, and not your owne. Wee'l send Mark Antony to the Senate house, And he shall say, you are not well to day: Let me vpon my knee, preuaile in this.
Cæs. Mark Antony shall say I am not well,
[1000]
And for thy humor, I will stay at home. Enter Decius. Heere's Decius Brutus, he shall tell them so.
Deci. Cæsar, all haile: Good morrow worthy Cæsar, I come to fetch you to the Senate house. Cæs. And you are come in very happy time,
[1005]
To beare my greeting to the Senators, And tell them that I will not come to day: Cannot, is false: and that I dare not, falser: I will not come to day, tell them so Decius.
Calp. Say he is sicke. Cæs.
[1010]
Shall Cæsar send a Lye? Haue I in Conquest stretcht mine Arme so farre, To be afear'd to tell Gray‑beards the truth: Decius, go tell them, Cæsar will not come.
Deci. Most mighty Cæsar, let me know some cause,
[1015]
Lest I be laught at when I tell them so.
Cæs. The cause is in my Will, I will not come, That is enough to satisfie the Senate. But for your priuate satisfaction, Because I loue you, I will let you know.
[1020]
Calphurnia heere my wife, stayes me at home: She dreampt to night, she saw my Statue, Which like a Fountaine, with an hundred spouts Did run pure blood: and many lusty Romans Came smiling, & did bathe their hands in it:
[1025]
And these does she apply, for warnings and portents, And euils imminent; and on her knee Hath begg'd, that I will stay at home to day.
Deci. This Dreame is all amisse interpreted, It was a vision, faire and fortunate:
[1030]
Your Statue spouting blood in many pipes, In which so many smiling Romans bath'd, Signifies, that from you great Rome shall sucke Reuiuing blood, and that great men shall presse For Tinctures, Staines, Reliques, and Cognisance.
[1035]
This by Calphurnia's Dreame is signified.
Cæs. And this way haue you well expounded it. Deci. I haue, when you haue heard what I can say: And know it now, the Senate haue concluded To giue this day, a Crowne to mighty Cæsar.
[1040]
If you shall send them word you will not come, Their mindes may change. Besides, it were a mocke Apt to be render'd, for some one to say, Breake vp the Senate, till another time: When Cæsars wife shall meete with better Dreames.
[1045]
If Cæsar hide himselfe, shall they not whisper Loe Cæsar is affraid? Pardon me Cæsar, for my deere deere loue To your proceeding, bids me tell you this: And reason to my loue is liable.
Cæs
[1050]
How foolish do your fears seeme now Calphurnia? I am ashamed I did yeeld to them. Giue me my Robe, for I will go. Enter Brutus, Ligarius, Metellus, Caska, Trebo­ nius, Cynna, and Publius. And looke where Publius is come to fetch me.
Pub. Good morrow Cæsar. Cæs.
[1055]
Welcome Publius. What Brutus, are you stirr'd so earely too? Good morrow Caska: Caius Ligarius, Cæsar was ne're so much your enemy, As that same Ague which hath made you leane. What is't a Clocke?
Bru.
[1060]
Cæsar, 'tis strucken eight.
Cæs. I thanke you for your paines and curtesie. Enter Antony. See, Antony that Reuels long a‑nights Is notwithstanding vp. Good morrow Antony Ant. So to most Noble Cæsar Cæs.
[1065]
Bid them prepare within: I am too blame to be thus waited for. Now Cynna, now Metellus: what Trebonius, I haue an houres talke in store for you: Remember that you call on me to day:
[1070]
Be neere me, that I may remember you.
Treb. Cæsar I will: and so neere will I be, That your best Friends shall wish I had beene further. Cæs. Good Friends go in, and taste some wine with me. And we (like Friends) will straight way go together. Bru.
[1075]
That euery like is not the same, O Cæsar, The heart of Brutus earnes to thinke vpon.
Exeunt
 

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<div type="scene" n="2" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 2, Scene 2]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="business">Thunder &amp; Lightning,</stage>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Iulius Cæsar in his Night‑gowne.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæsar.</speaker>
      <l n="941">Nor Heauen, nor Earth,</l>
      <l n="942">Haue beene at peace to night:</l>
      <l n="943">Thrice hath<hi rend="italic">Calphurnia</hi>, in her sleepe cryed out,</l>
      <l n="944">Helpe, ho: They murther<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>. Who's within?</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter a Seruant.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-jc-ser">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ser.</speaker>
      <l n="945">My Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="946">Go bid the Priests do present Sacrifice,</l>
      <l n="947">And bring me their opinions of Successe.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-ser">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ser.</speaker>
      <l n="948">I will my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit</stage>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Calphurnia.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cal.</speaker>
      <l n="949">What mean you<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>? Think you to walk forth?</l>
      <l n="950">You shall not stirre out of your house to day.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="951">
         <hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>shall forth; the things that threaten'd me,</l>
      <l n="952">Ne're look'd but on my backe: When they shall see</l>
      <l n="953">The face of<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>, they are vanished.</l>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0727-0.jpg" n="117"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Calp.</speaker>
      <l n="954">Cæsar, I neuer stood on Ceremonies,</l>
      <l n="955">Yet now they fright me: There is one within,</l>
      <l n="956">Besides the things that we haue heard and seene,</l>
      <l n="957">Recounts most horrid sights seene by the Watch.</l>
      <l n="958">A Lionnesse hath whelped in the streets,</l>
      <l n="959">And Graues haue yawn'd, and yeelded vp their dead;</l>
      <l n="960">Fierce fiery Warriours fight vpon the Clouds</l>
      <l n="961">In Rankes and Squadrons, and right forme of Warre</l>
      <l n="962">Which drizel'd blood vpon the Capitoll:</l>
      <l n="963">The noise of Battell hurtled in the Ayre:</l>
      <l n="964">Horsses do neigh, and dying men did grone,</l>
      <l n="965">And Ghosts did shrieke and squeale about the streets.</l>
      <l n="966">O<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>, these things are beyond all vse,</l>
      <l n="967">And I do feare them.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="968">What can be auoyded</l>
      <l n="969">Whose end is purpos'd by the mighty Gods?</l>
      <l n="970">Yet<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>shall go forth: for these Predictions</l>
      <l n="971">Are to the world in generall, as to<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Calp.</speaker>
      <l n="972">When Beggers dye, there are no Comets seen,</l>
      <l n="973">The Heauens themselues blaze forth the death of Princes</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Caes.</speaker>
      <l n="974">Cowards dye many times before their deaths,</l>
      <l n="975">The valiant neuer taste of death but once:</l>
      <l n="976">Of all the Wonders that I yet haue heard,</l>
      <l n="977">It seemes to me most strange that men should feare,</l>
      <l n="978">Seeing that death, a necessary end</l>
      <l n="979">Will come, when it will come.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter a Seruant.</stage>
      <l n="980">What say the Augurers?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-ser">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ser.</speaker>
      <l n="981">They would not haue you to stirre forth to day.</l>
      <l n="982">Plucking the intrailes of an Offering forth,</l>
      <l n="983">They could not finde a heart within the beast.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="984">The Gods do this in shame of Cowardice:</l>
      <l n="985">
         <hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>should be a Beast without a heart</l>
      <l n="986">If he should stay at home to day for feare:</l>
      <l n="987">No<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>shall not; Danger knowes full well</l>
      <l n="988">That<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>is more dangerous then he.</l>
      <l n="989">We heare two Lyons litter'd in one day,</l>
      <l n="990">And I the elder and more terrible,</l>
      <l n="991">And Cæsar shall go foorth.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Calp.</speaker>
      <l n="992">Alas my Lord,</l>
      <l n="993">Your wisedome is consum'd in confidence:</l>
      <l n="994">Do not go forth to day: Call it my feare,</l>
      <l n="995">That keepes you in the house, and not your owne.</l>
      <l n="996">Wee'l send<hi rend="italic">Mark Antony</hi>to the Senate house,</l>
      <l n="997">And he shall say, you are not well to day:</l>
      <l n="998">Let me vpon my knee, preuaile in this.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="999">
         <hi rend="italic">Mark Antony</hi>shall say I am not well,</l>
      <l n="1000">And for thy humor, I will stay at home.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Decius.</stage>
      <l n="1001">Heere's<hi rend="italic">Decius Brutus</hi>, he shall tell them so.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-dec">
      <speaker rend="italic">Deci.</speaker>
      <l n="1002">
         <hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>, all haile: Good morrow worthy<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1003">I come to fetch you to the Senate house.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="1004">And you are come in very happy time,</l>
      <l n="1005">To beare my greeting to the Senators,</l>
      <l n="1006">And tell them that I will not come to day:</l>
      <l n="1007">Cannot, is false: and that I dare not, falser:</l>
      <l n="1008">I will not come to day, tell them so<hi rend="italic">Decius</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Calp.</speaker>
      <l n="1009">Say he is sicke.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="1010">Shall<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>send a Lye?</l>
      <l n="1011">Haue I in Conquest stretcht mine Arme so farre,</l>
      <l n="1012">To be afear'd to tell Gray‑beards the truth:</l>
      <l n="1013">
         <hi rend="italic">Decius</hi>, go tell them,<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>will not come.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-dec">
      <speaker rend="italic">Deci.</speaker>
      <l n="1014">Most mighty<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>, let me know some cause,</l>
      <l n="1015">Lest I be laught at when I tell them so.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="1016">The cause is in my Will, I will not come,</l>
      <l n="1017">That is enough to satisfie the Senate.</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="1018">But for your priuate satisfaction,</l>
      <l n="1019">Because I loue you, I will let you know.</l>
      <l n="1020">
         <hi rend="italic">Calphurnia</hi>heere my wife, stayes me at home:</l>
      <l n="1021">She dreampt to night, she saw my Statue,</l>
      <l n="1022">Which like a Fountaine, with an hundred spouts</l>
      <l n="1023">Did run pure blood: and many lusty Romans</l>
      <l n="1024">Came smiling, &amp; did bathe their hands in it:</l>
      <l n="1025">And these does she apply, for warnings and portents,</l>
      <l n="1026">And euils imminent; and on her knee</l>
      <l n="1027">Hath begg'd, that I will stay at home to day.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-dec">
      <speaker rend="italic">Deci.</speaker>
      <l n="1028">This Dreame is all amisse interpreted,</l>
      <l n="1029">It was a vision, faire and fortunate:</l>
      <l n="1030">Your Statue spouting blood in many pipes,</l>
      <l n="1031">In which so many smiling Romans bath'd,</l>
      <l n="1032">Signifies, that from you great Rome shall sucke</l>
      <l n="1033">Reuiuing blood, and that great men shall presse</l>
      <l n="1034">For Tinctures, Staines, Reliques, and Cognisance.</l>
      <l n="1035">This by<hi rend="italic">Calphurnia's</hi>Dreame is signified.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="1036">And this way haue you well expounded it.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-dec">
      <speaker rend="italic">Deci.</speaker>
      <l n="1037">I haue, when you haue heard what I can say:</l>
      <l n="1038">And know it now, the Senate haue concluded</l>
      <l n="1039">To giue this day, a Crowne to mighty<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>.</l>
      <l n="1040">If you shall send them word you will not come,</l>
      <l n="1041">Their mindes may change. Besides, it were a mocke</l>
      <l n="1042">Apt to be render'd, for some one to say,</l>
      <l n="1043">Breake vp the Senate, till another time:</l>
      <l n="1044">When<hi rend="italic">Cæsars</hi>wife shall meete with better Dreames.</l>
      <l n="1045">If<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>hide himselfe, shall they not whisper</l>
      <l n="1046">Loe<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>is affraid?</l>
      <l n="1047">Pardon me<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>, for my deere deere loue</l>
      <l n="1048">To your proceeding, bids me tell you this:</l>
      <l n="1049">And reason to my loue is liable.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs</speaker>
      <l n="1050">How foolish do your fears seeme now<hi rend="italic">Calphurnia</hi>?</l>
      <l n="1051">I am ashamed I did yeeld to them.</l>
      <l n="1052">Giue me my Robe, for I will go.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Brutus, Ligarius, Metellus, Caska, Trebo­
      <lb/>nius, Cynna, and Publius.</stage>
      <l n="1053">And looke where<hi rend="italic">Publius</hi>is come to fetch me.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-pub">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pub.</speaker>
      <l n="1054">Good morrow<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="1055">Welcome<hi rend="italic">Publius</hi>.</l>
      <l n="1056">What<hi rend="italic">Brutus</hi>, are you stirr'd so earely too?</l>
      <l n="1057">Good morrow<hi rend="italic">Caska: Caius Ligarius,
      <lb/>Cæsar</hi>was ne're so much your enemy,</l>
      <l n="1058">As that same Ague which hath made you leane.</l>
      <l n="1059">What is't a Clocke?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-bru">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bru.</speaker>
      <l n="1060">
         <hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>, 'tis strucken eight.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="1061">I thanke you for your paines and curtesie.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Antony.</stage>
      <l n="1062">See,<hi rend="italic">Antony</hi>that Reuels long a‑nights</l>
      <l n="1063">Is notwithstanding vp. Good morrow<hi rend="italic">Antony</hi>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-ant">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ant.</speaker>
      <l n="1064">So to most Noble<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="1065">Bid them prepare within:</l>
      <l n="1066">I am too blame to be thus waited for.</l>
      <l n="1067">Now<hi rend="italic">Cynna</hi>, now<hi rend="italic">Metellus</hi>: what<hi rend="italic">Trebonius</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1068">I haue an houres talke in store for you:</l>
      <l n="1069">Remember that you call on me to day:</l>
      <l n="1070">Be neere me, that I may remember you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-tre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Treb.</speaker>
      <l n="1071">
         <hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>I will: and so neere will I be,</l>
      <l n="1072">That your best Friends shall wish I had beene further.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-cae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cæs.</speaker>
      <l n="1073">Good Friends go in, and taste some wine with me.</l>
      <l n="1074">And we (like Friends) will straight way go together.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-jc-bru">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bru.</speaker>
      <l n="1075">That euery like is not the same, O<hi rend="italic">Cæsar</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1076">The heart of<hi rend="italic">Brutus</hi>earnes to thinke vpon.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt</stage>
</div>

        
        

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