The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



Text and Image

Here you can read a digital edition of each play in various views.

Page Image & Text
Digital Text
XML

Reference: qq3r - Tragedies, p. 285

Left Column


The Tragedie of King Lear. Bur. Pardon me Royall Sir, Election makes not vp in such conditions. Le.
[220]
Then leaue her sir, for by the powre that made me, I tell you all her wealth. For you great King, I would not from your loue make such a stray, To match you where I hate, therefore beseech you T'auert your liking a more worthier way,
[225]
Then on a wretch whom Nature is asham'd Almost t'acknowledge hers.
Fra. This is most strange, That she whom euen but now, was your obiect, The argument of your praise, balme of your age,
[230]
The best, the deerest, should in this trice of time Commit a thing so monstrous, to dismantle So many folds of fauour: sure her offence Must be of such vnnaturall degree, That monsters it: Or your fore‐voucht affection
[235]
Fall into taint, which to beleeue of her Must be a faith that reason without miracle Should neuer plant in me.
Cor. I yet beseech your Maiesty. If for I want that glib and oylie Art,
[240]
To speake and purpose not, since what I will intend, Ile do't before I speake, that you make knowne It is no vicious blot, murther, or foulenesse, No vnchaste action or dishonoured step That hath depriu'd me of your Grace and fauour,
[245]
But euen for want of that, for which I am richer, A still soliciting eye, and such a tongue, That I am glad I haue not, though not to haue it, Hath lost me in your liking.
Lear. Better thou had'st
[250]
Not beene borne, then not t'haue pleas'd me better.
Fra. Is it but this? A tardinesse in nature, Which often leaues the history vnspoke That it intends to do: my Lord of Burgundy, What say you to the Lady? Loue's not loue
[255]
When it is mingled with regards, that stands Aloofe from th'intire point, will you haue her? She is herselfe a Dowrie.
Bur. RoyallKing, Giue but that portion which your selfe propos'd,
[260]
And here I take Cordelia by the hand, Dutchesse of Burgundie.
Lear.

Nothing, I haue sworne, I am firme.

Bur. I am sorry then you haue so lost a Father, That you must loose a husband. Cor.
[265]
Peace be with Burgundie, Since that respect and Fortunes are his loue, I shall not be his wife.
Fra. Fairest Cordelia, that art most rich being poore, Most choise forsaken, and most lou'd despis'd,
[270]
Thee and thy vertues here I seize vpon, Be it lawfull I take vp what's cast away. Gods, Gods! 'Tis strange, that from their cold'st neglect My Loue should kindle to enflame'd respect. Thy dowrelesse Daughter King, throwne to my chance,
[275]
Is Queene of vs, of ours, and our faire France: Not all the Dukes of watrish Burgundy, Can buy this vnpriz'd precious Maid of me. Bid them farewell Cordelia, though vnkinde, Thou loosest here a better where to finde.
Lear.
[280]
Thou hast her France, let her be thine, for we Haue no such Daughter, nor shall euer see That face of hers againe, therfore be gone, Without our Grace, our Loue, our Benizon:

Image


[full image]

Right Column


Come Noble Burgundie. Flo ri h. Exeunt. Fra.
[285]

Bid farwell to your Sisters.

Cor. The Iewels of our Father, with wash'd eies Cordelia leaues you, I know you what you are, And like a Sister am most loth to call Your faults as they are named. Loue well our Father:
[290]
To your professed bosomes I commit him, But yet alas, stood I within his Grace, I would prefer him to a better place, So farewell to you both.
Regn.

Prescribe not vs our dutie.

Gon.
[295]
Let your study Be to content your Lord, who hath receiu'd you At Fortunes almes, you haue obedience scanted, And well are worth the want that you haue wanted.
Cor. Time shall vnfold what plighted cunning hides,
[300]
Who couers faults, at last with shame derides: Well may you prosper.
Fra.

Come my faire Cordelia.

Exit France and Cor. Gon. Sister, it is not little I haue to say, Of what most neerely appertaines to vs both,
[305]
I thinke our Father will hence to night. with vs.
Reg.

That's most certaine, and with you: next moneth

Gon.

You see how full of changes his age is, the ob­seruation

we haue made of it hath beene little; he always

lou'd our Sister most, and with what poore iudgement he

[310]

hath now cast her off, appeares too grossely.

Reg.

'Tis the infirmity of his age, yet he hath euer but

slenderly knowne himself.

Gon.

The best and soundest of his time hath bin but

rash, then must we looke from his age, to receiue not a­lone

[315]

the imperfections of long Ingrasfed condition, but

therewithall the vnruly way‐wardnesse, that infirme and

cholericke yeares bring with them.

Reg.

Such vnconstant starts are we like to haue from

him, as this of Kents banishment.

Gon.
[320]

There is further complement of leaue‐taking be­tweene

France and him, pray you let vs sit together, if our

Father carry authority with such disposition as he beares,

this last surrender of his will but offend vs.

Reg.

We shall further thinke of it.

Gon.
[325]

We must do something, and i'th' heate.

Exeunt.
Scena Secunda. [Act 1, Scene 2] Enter Bastard. Bast. Thou Nature art my Goddesse, to thy Law My seruices are bound, wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custome, and permit The curiosity of Nations, to depriue me?
[330]
For that I am some twelue, or fourteene Moonshines Lag of a Brother? Why Bastard? Wherefore base? When my Dimensions are as well compact, My minde as generous, and my shape as true As honest Madams issue? Why brand they vs
[335]
With Base? With basenes Bastardie? Base, Base? Who in the lustie stealth of Nature, take More composition, and fierce qualitie, Then doth within a dull stale tyred bed Goe to th' creating a whole tribe of Fops
[340]
Got 'tweene a sleepe, and wake? Well then, Legitimate Edgar, I must haue your land, Our Fathers loue, is to the Bastard Edmond, As to th'legitimate: fine word: Legitimate. qq3 Well

Download the digital text and images of the play



 
Scena Secunda. [Act 1, Scene 2] Enter Bastard. Bast. Thou Nature art my Goddesse, to thy Law My seruices are bound, wherefore should I Stand in the plague of custome, and permit The curiosity of Nations, to depriue me?
[330]
For that I am some twelue, or fourteene Moonshines Lag of a Brother? Why Bastard? Wherefore base? When my Dimensions are as well compact, My minde as generous, and my shape as true As honest Madams issue? Why brand they vs
[335]
With Base? With basenes Bastardie? Base, Base? Who in the lustie stealth of Nature, take More composition, and fierce qualitie, Then doth within a dull stale tyred bed Goe to th' creating a whole tribe of Fops
[340]
Got 'tweene a sleepe, and wake? Well then, Legitimate Edgar, I must haue your land, Our Fathers loue, is to the Bastard Edmond, As to th'legitimate: fine word: Legitimate. Well, my Legittimate, if this Letter speed,
[345]
And my inuention thriue, Edmond the base Shall to'th'Legitimate: I grow, I prosper: Now Gods, stand vp for Bastards.
Enter Gloucester. Glo. Kent banish'd thus? and France in choller parted? And the King gone to night? Prescrib'd his powre,
[350]
Confin'd to exhibition? All this done Vpon the gad? Edmond, how now? What newes?
Bast.

So please your Lordship, none.

Glou.

Why so earnestly seeke you to put vp y Letter?

Bast.

I know no newes, my Lord.

Glou.
[355]

What Paper were you reading?

Bast.

Nothing my Lord.

Glou.

No? what needed then that terrible dispatch of

it into your Pocket? The quality of nothing, hath not

such neede to hide it selfe. Let's see: come, if it bee no­thing,

[360]

I shall not neede Spectacles.

Bast.

I beseech you Sir, pardon mee; it is a Letter

from my Brother, that I haue not all ore‐read; and for so

much as I haue perus'd, I finde it not fit for your ore‐loo­king.

Glou.

Giue me the Letter, Sir.

Bast.
[365]
I shall offend, either to detaine, or giue it: The Contents, as in part I vnderstand them, Are too blame.
Glou.

Let's see, let's see.

Bast.

I hope for my Brothers iustification, hee wrote

[370]

this but as an essay, or taste of my Vertue.

Glou.reads.

This policie, and reuerence of Age, makes the

world bitter to the best of our times: keepes our Fortunes from

vs, till our oldnesse cannot rellish them. I begin to finde an idle

and fond bondage, in the oppression of aged tyranny, who sw ayes

[375]

not as it hath power, but as it is suffer'd. Come to me, that of

this I may speake more. If our Father would sleepe till I wak'd

him, you should enioy halfe his Reuennew for euer, and liue the

beloued of your Brother. Edgar.

Hum? Conspiracy? Sleepe till I wake him, you should

[380]

enioy halfe his Reuennew: my Sonne Edgar, had hee a

hand to write this? A heart and braine to breede it in?

When came you to this? Who brought it?

Bast.

It was not brought mee, my Lord; there's the

cunning of it. I found it throwne in at the Casement of

[385]

my Closset.

Glou.

You know the character to be your Brothers?

Bast.

If the matter were good my Lord, I durst swear

it were his: but in respect of that, I would faine thinke it

were not.

Glou.
[390]

It is his.

Bast.

It is his hand, my Lord: but I hope his heart is

not in the Contents.

Glo.

Has he neuer before sounded you in this busines?

Bast.

Neuer my Lord. But I haue heard him oft main­taine

[395]

it to be fit, that Sonnes at perfect age, and Fathers

declin'd, the Father should bee as Ward to the Son, and

the Sonne manage his Reuennew.

Glou.

O Villain, villain: his very opinion in the Let­ter.

Abhorred Villaine, vnnaturall, detested, brutish

[400]

Villaine; worse then brutish: Go sirrah, seeke him: Ile

apprehend him. Abhominable Villaine, where is he?

Bast.

I do not well know my L. If it shall please you to

suspend your indignation against my Brother, til you can

deriue from him better testimony of his intent, you shold

[405]

run a certaine course: where, if you violently proceed a­gainst

him, mistaking his purpose, it would make a great

gap in your owne Honor, and shake in peeces, the heart of

his obedience. I dare pawne downe my life for him, that

he hath writ this to feele my affection to your Honor, &

[410]

to no other pretence of danger.

Glou.

Thinke you so?

Bast.

If your Honor iudge it meete, I will place you

where you shall heare vs conferre of this, and by an Auri­cular

assurance haue your satisfaction, and that without

[415]

any further delay, then this very Euening.

Glou.

He cannot bee such a Monster. Edmond seeke

him out: winde me into him, I pray you: frame the Bu­sinesse

after your owne wisedome. I would vnstate my

selfe, to be in a due resolution.

Bast.
[420]

I will seeke him Sir, presently: conuey the bu­sinesse

as I shall find meanes, and acquaint you withall.

Glou.

These late Eclipses in the Sun and Moone por­tend

no good to vs: though the wisedome of Nature can

reason it thus, and thus, yet Nature finds it selfe scourg'd

[425]

by the sequent effects. Loue cooles, friendship falls off,

Brothers diuide. In Cities, mutinies; in Countries, dis­cord;

in Pallaces, Treason; and the Bond crack'd, 'twixt

Sonne and Father. This villaine of mine comes vnder the

prediction; there's Son against Father, the King fals from

[430]

byas of Nature, there's Father against Childe. We haue

seene the best of our time. Machinations, hollownesse,

treacherie, and all ruinous disorders follow vs disquietly

to our Graues. Find out this Villain, Edmond, it shall lose

thee nothing, do it carefully: and the Noble & true‐har­ted

[435]

Kent banish'd; his offence, honesty. 'Tis strange.

Exit Bast.

This is the excellent foppery of the world, that

when we are sicke in fortune, often the surfets of our own

behauiour, we make guilty of our disasters, the Sun, the

Moone, and Starres, as if we were villaines on necessitie,

[440]

Fooles by heauenly compulsion, Knaues, Theeues, and

Treachers by Sphericall predominance. Drunkards, Ly­ars,

and Adulterers by an inforc'd obedience of Planatary

influence; and all that we are euill in, by a diuine thru­sting

on. An admirable euasion of Whore‐master‐man,

[445]

to lay his Goatish disposition on the charge of a Starre,

My father compounded with my mother vnder the Dra­gons

taile, and my Natiuity was vnder Vrsa Maior, so

that it followes, I am rough and Leacherous. I should

haue bin that I am, had the maidenlest Starre in the Fir­mament

[450]

twinkled on my bastardizing.

Enter Edgar.

Pat: he comes like the Catastrophe of the old Comedie:

my Cue is villanous Melancholly, with a sighe like Tom

o'Bedlam. ——— O these Eclipses do portend these diui­sions.

Fa, Sol, La, Me.

Edg.

How now Brother Edmond, what serious con­templation

are you in?

Bast.

I am thinking Brother of a prediction I read this

other day, what should follow these Eclipses.

Edg.
[455]

Do you busie your selfe with that?

Bast.

I promise you, the effects he writes of, succeede

vnhappily.

When saw you my Father last?

Edg.

The night gone by.

Bast.
[460]

Spake you with him?

Edg.

I, two houres together.

Bast.

Parted you in good termes? Found you no dis­pleasure

in him, by word, nor countenance?

Edg.

None at all,

Bast.
[465]

Bethink your selfe wherein you may haue offen­ded

him: and at my entreaty forbeare his presence, vntill

some little time hath quailfied the heat of his displeasure,

which at this instant so rageth in him, that with the mis­

chiefe of your person, it would scarsely alay.

Edg.
[470]

Some Villaine hath done me wrong.

Edm.

That's my feare, I pray you haue a continent

forbear ance till the speed of his rage goes slower: and as

I say, retire with me to my lodging, from whence I will

fitly bring you to heare my Lord speake: pray ye goe,

[475]

there's my key: if you do stirre abroad, goe arm'd.

Edg.

Arm'd, Brother?

Edm.

Brother, I aduise you to the best, I am no honest

man, if ther be any good meaning toward you: I haue told

you what I haue seene, and heard: But faintly. Nothing

[480]

like the image, and horror of it, pray you away.

Edg.

Shall I heare from you anon?

Exit. Edm. I do serue you in this businesse: A Credulous Father, and a Brother Noble, Whose nature is so farre from doing harmes,
[485]
That he suspects none: on whose foolish honestie My practises ride easie: I see the businesse. Let me, if not by birth, haue lands by wit, All with me's meete, that I can fashion fit.
Exit.
 

Download the digital text of the play

        
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="2">
   <head rend="italic center">Scena Secunda.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 1, Scene 2]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Bastard.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <l n="326">Thou Nature art my Goddesse, to thy Law</l>
      <l n="327">My seruices are bound, wherefore should I</l>
      <l n="328">Stand in the plague of custome, and permit</l>
      <l n="329">The curiosity of Nations, to depriue me?</l>
      <l n="330">For that I am some twelue, or fourteene Moonshines</l>
      <l n="331">Lag of a Brother? Why Bastard? Wherefore base?</l>
      <l n="332">When my Dimensions are as well compact,</l>
      <l n="333">My minde as generous, and my shape as true</l>
      <l n="334">As honest Madams issue? Why brand they vs</l>
      <l n="335">With Base? With basenes Bastardie? Base, Base?</l>
      <l n="336">Who in the lustie stealth of Nature, take</l>
      <l n="337">More composition, and fierce qualitie,</l>
      <l n="338">Then doth within a dull stale tyred bed</l>
      <l n="339">Goe to th' creating a whole tribe of Fops</l>
      <l n="340">Got 'tweene a sleepe, and wake? Well then,</l>
      <l n="341">Legitimate<hi rend="italic">Edgar</hi>, I must haue your land,</l>
      <l n="342">Our Fathers loue, is to the Bastard<hi rend="italic">Edmond</hi>,</l>
      <l n="343">As to th'legitimate: fine word: Legitimate.</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0796-0.jpg" n="286"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="344">Well, my Legittimate, if this Letter speed,</l>
      <l n="345">And my inuention thriue,<hi rend="italic">Edmond</hi>the base</l>
      <l n="346">Shall to'th'Legitimate: I grow, I prosper:</l>
      <l n="347">Now Gods, stand vp for Bastards.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Gloucester.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glo.</speaker>
      <l n="348">Kent banish'd thus? and France in choller parted?</l>
      <l n="349">And the King gone to night? Prescrib'd his powre,</l>
      <l n="350">Confin'd to exhibition? All this done</l>
      <l n="351">Vpon the gad?<hi rend="italic">Edmond</hi>, how now? What newes?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="352">So please your Lordship, none.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="353">Why so earnestly seeke you to put vp y Letter?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="354">I know no newes, my Lord.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="355">What Paper were you reading?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="356">Nothing my Lord.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="357">No? what needed then that terrible dispatch of
      <lb n="358"/>it into your Pocket? The quality of nothing, hath not
      <lb n="359"/>such neede to hide it selfe. Let's see: come, if it bee no­thing,
      <lb n="360"/>I shall not neede Spectacles.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="361">I beseech you Sir, pardon mee; it is a Letter
      <lb n="362"/>from my Brother, that I haue not all ore‐read; and for so
      <lb n="363"/>much as I haue perus'd, I finde it not fit for your ore‐loo­king.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="364">Giue me the Letter, Sir.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <l n="365">I shall offend, either to detaine, or giue it:</l>
      <l n="366">The Contents, as in part I vnderstand them,</l>
      <l n="367">Are too blame.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="368">Let's see, let's see.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="369">I hope for my Brothers iustification, hee wrote
      <lb n="370"/>this but as an essay, or taste of my Vertue.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.reads.</speaker>
      <p n="371">
         <hi rend="italic">This policie, and reuerence of Age, makes the</hi>
         
      <lb n="372"/>
         <hi rend="italic">world bitter to the best of our times: keepes our Fortunes from</hi>
         
      <lb n="373"/>
         <hi rend="italic">vs, till our oldnesse cannot rellish them. I begin to finde an idle</hi>
         
      <lb n="374"/>
         <hi rend="italic">and fond bondage, in the oppression of aged tyranny, who sw ayes</hi>
         
      <lb n="375"/>
         <hi rend="italic">not as it hath power, but as it is suffer'd. Come to me, that of</hi>
         
      <lb n="376"/>
         <hi rend="italic">this I may speake more. If our Father would sleepe till I wak'd</hi>
         
      <lb n="377"/>
         <hi rend="italic">him, you should enioy halfe his Reuennew for euer, and liue the</hi>
         
      <lb n="378"/>
         <hi rend="italic">beloued of your Brother.</hi>Edgar.
      <lb n="379"/>Hum? Conspiracy? Sleepe till I wake him, you should
      <lb n="380"/>enioy halfe his Reuennew: my Sonne<hi rend="italic">Edgar</hi>, had hee a
      <lb n="381"/>hand to write this? A heart and braine to breede it in?
      <lb n="382"/>When came you to this? Who brought it?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="383">It was not brought mee, my Lord; there's the
      <lb n="384"/>cunning of it. I found it throwne in at the Casement of
      <lb n="385"/>my Closset.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="386">You know the character to be your Brothers?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="387">If the matter were good my Lord, I durst swear
      <lb n="388"/>it were his: but in respect of that, I would faine thinke it
      <lb n="389"/>were not.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="390">It is his.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="391">It is his hand, my Lord: but I hope his heart is
      <lb n="392"/>not in the Contents.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glo.</speaker>
      <p n="393">Has he neuer before sounded you in this busines?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="394">Neuer my Lord. But I haue heard him oft main­taine
      <lb n="395"/>it to be fit, that Sonnes at perfect age, and Fathers
      <lb n="396"/>declin'd, the Father should bee as Ward to the Son, and
      <lb n="397"/>the Sonne manage his Reuennew.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="398">O Villain, villain: his very opinion in the Let­ter.
      <lb n="399"/>Abhorred Villaine, vnnaturall, detested, brutish
      <lb n="400"/>Villaine; worse then brutish: Go sirrah, seeke him: Ile
      <lb n="401"/>apprehend him. Abhominable Villaine, where is he?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="402">I do not well know my L. If it shall please you to
      <lb n="403"/>suspend your indignation against my Brother, til you can
      <lb n="404"/>deriue from him better testimony of his intent, you shold
      <lb n="405"/>run a certaine course: where, if you violently proceed a­gainst
      <lb n="406"/>him, mistaking his purpose, it would make a great
      <lb n="407"/>gap in your owne Honor, and shake in peeces, the heart of</p>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <p n="408">his obedience. I dare pawne downe my life for him, that
      <lb n="409"/>he hath writ this to feele my affection to your Honor, &amp;
      <lb n="410"/>to no other pretence of danger.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="411">Thinke you so?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="412">If your Honor iudge it meete, I will place you
      <lb n="413"/>where you shall heare vs conferre of this, and by an Auri­cular
      <lb n="414"/>assurance haue your satisfaction, and that without
      <lb n="415"/>any further delay, then this very Euening.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="416">He cannot bee such a Monster.<hi rend="italic">Edmond</hi>seeke
      <lb n="417"/>him out: winde me into him, I pray you: frame the Bu­sinesse
      <lb n="418"/>after your owne wisedome. I would vnstate my
      <lb n="419"/>selfe, to be in a due resolution.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="420">I will seeke him Sir, presently: conuey the bu­sinesse
      <lb n="421"/>as I shall find meanes, and acquaint you withall.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-glo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Glou.</speaker>
      <p n="422">These late Eclipses in the Sun and Moone por­tend
      <lb n="423"/>no good to vs: though the wisedome of Nature can
      <lb n="424"/>reason it thus, and thus, yet Nature finds it selfe scourg'd
      <lb n="425"/>by the sequent effects. Loue cooles, friendship falls off,
      <lb n="426"/>Brothers diuide. In Cities, mutinies; in Countries, dis­cord;
      <lb n="427"/>in Pallaces, Treason; and the Bond crack'd, 'twixt
      <lb n="428"/>Sonne and Father. This villaine of mine comes vnder the
      <lb n="429"/>prediction; there's Son against Father, the King fals from
      <lb n="430"/>byas of Nature, there's Father against Childe. We haue
      <lb n="431"/>seene the best of our time. Machinations, hollownesse,
      <lb n="432"/>treacherie, and all ruinous disorders follow vs disquietly
      <lb n="433"/>to our Graues. Find out this Villain,<hi rend="italic">Edmond</hi>, it shall lose
      <lb n="434"/>thee nothing, do it carefully: and the Noble &amp; true‐har­ted
      <lb n="435"/>Kent banish'd; his offence, honesty. 'Tis strange.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit</stage>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="436">This is the excellent foppery of the world, that
      <lb n="437"/>when we are sicke in fortune, often the surfets of our own
      <lb n="438"/>behauiour, we make guilty of our disasters, the Sun, the
      <lb n="439"/>Moone, and Starres, as if we were villaines on necessitie,
      <lb n="440"/>Fooles by heauenly compulsion, Knaues, Theeues, and
      <lb n="441"/>Treachers by Sphericall predominance. Drunkards, Ly­ars,
      <lb n="442"/>and Adulterers by an inforc'd obedience of Planatary
      <lb n="443"/>influence; and all that we are euill in, by a diuine thru­sting
      <lb n="444"/>on. An admirable euasion of Whore‐master‐man,
      <lb n="445"/>to lay his Goatish disposition on the charge of a Starre,
      <lb n="446"/>My father compounded with my mother vnder the Dra­gons
      <lb n="447"/>taile, and my Natiuity was vnder<hi rend="italic">Vrsa Maior</hi>, so
      <lb n="448"/>that it followes, I am rough and Leacherous. I should
      <lb n="449"/>haue bin that I am, had the maidenlest Starre in the Fir­mament
      <lb n="450"/>twinkled on my bastardizing.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Edgar.</stage>
   <p>Pat: he comes like the Catastrophe of the old Comedie:
      <lb/>my Cue is villanous Melancholly, with a sighe like<hi rend="italic">Tom</hi>
      
      <lb/>o'Bedlam. ——— O these Eclipses do portend these diui­sions.
      <lb/>Fa, Sol, La, Me.</p>
   <sp who="#F-lr-edg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edg.</speaker>
      <p n="451">How now Brother<hi rend="italic">Edmond</hi>, what serious con­templation
      <lb n="452"/>are you in?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="453">I am thinking Brother of a prediction I read this
      <lb n="454"/>other day, what should follow these Eclipses.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-edg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edg.</speaker>
      <p n="455">Do you busie your selfe with that?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="456">I promise you, the effects he writes of, succeede
      <lb n="457"/>vnhappily.</p>
      <p n="458">When saw you my Father last?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-edg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edg.</speaker>
      <p n="459">The night gone by.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="460">Spake you with him?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-edg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edg.</speaker>
      <p n="461">I, two houres together.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="462">Parted you in good termes? Found you no dis­pleasure
      <lb n="463"/>in him, by word, nor countenance?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-edg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edg.</speaker>
      <p n="464">None at all,</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bast.</speaker>
      <p n="465">Bethink your selfe wherein you may haue offen­ded
      <lb n="466"/>him: and at my entreaty forbeare his presence, vntill
      <lb n="467"/>some little time hath quailfied the heat of his displeasure,
      <lb n="468"/>which at this instant so rageth in him, that with the mis­</p>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0797-0.jpg" n="287"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <p n="469">chiefe of your person, it would scarsely alay.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-edg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edg.</speaker>
      <p n="470">Some Villaine hath done me wrong.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edm.</speaker>
      <p n="471">That's my feare, I pray you haue a continent
      <lb n="472"/>forbear ance till the speed of his rage goes slower: and as
      <lb n="473"/>I say, retire with me to my lodging, from whence I will
      <lb n="474"/>fitly bring you to heare my Lord speake: pray ye goe,
      <lb n="475"/>there's my key: if you do stirre abroad, goe arm'd.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-edg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edg.</speaker>
      <p n="476">Arm'd, Brother?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edm.</speaker>
      <p n="477">Brother, I aduise you to the best, I am no honest
      <lb n="478"/>man, if ther be any good meaning toward you: I haue told
      <lb n="479"/>you what I haue seene, and heard: But faintly. Nothing
      <lb n="480"/>like the image, and horror of it, pray you away.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-lr-edg">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edg.</speaker>
      <p n="481">Shall I heare from you anon?</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-lr-bas">
      <speaker rend="italic">Edm.</speaker>
      <l n="482">I do serue you in this businesse:</l>
      <l n="483">A Credulous Father, and a Brother Noble,</l>
      <l n="484">Whose nature is so farre from doing harmes,</l>
      <l n="485">That he suspects none: on whose foolish honestie</l>
      <l n="486">My practises ride easie: I see the businesse.</l>
      <l n="487">Let me, if not by birth, haue lands by wit,</l>
      <l n="488">All with me's meete, that I can fashion fit.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
</div>

        
        

Download the XML