The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: mm5v - Tragedies, p. 142

Left Column


The Tragedie of Macbeth. Macb. The Table's full. Lenox. Heere is a place reseru'd Sir. Macb. Where? Lenox.
[1240]
Heere my good Lord. What is't that moues your Highnesse ?
Macb. Which of you haue done this? Lords. What, my good Lord? Macb. Thou canst not say I did it: neuer shake
[1245]
Thy goary lockes at me.
Rosse. Gentlemen rise, his Highnesse is not well. Lady. Sit worthy Friends: my Lord is often thus, And hath beene from his youth. Pray you keepe Seat, The fit is momentary, vpon a thought
[1250]
He will againe be well. If much you note him You shall offend him, and extend his Passion, Feed, and regard him not. Are you a man?
Macb. I, and a bold one, that dare looke on that Which might appall the Diuell. La.
[1255]
O proper stuffe: This is the very painting of your feare: This is the Ayre‑drawne‑Dagger which you said Led you to Duncan. O, these flawes and starts (Impostors to true feare) would well become
[1260]
A womans story, at a Winters fire Authoriz'd by her Grandam: shame it selfe, Why do you make such faces? When all's done You looke but on a stoole.
Macb. Prythee see there:
[1265]
Behold, looke, loe, how say you: Why what care I, if thou canst nod, speake too. If Charnell houses, and our Graues must send Those that we bury, backe; our Monuments Shall be the Mawes of Kytes.
La.
[1270]
What? quite vnmann'd in folly.
Macb. If I stand heere, I saw him. La. Fie for shame. Macb. Blood hath bene shed ere now, i'th'olden time Ere humane Statute purg'd the gentle Weale:
[1275]
I, and since too, Murthers haue bene perform'd Too terrible for the eare. The times has bene, That when the Braines were out, the man would dye, And there an end: But now they rise againe With twenty mortall murthers on their crownes,
[1280]
And push vs from our stooles. This is more strange Then such a murther is.
La. My worthy Lord Your Noble Friends do lacke you. Macb. I do forget:
[1285]
Do not muse at me my most worthy Friends, I haue a strange infirmity, which is nothing To those that know me. Come, loue and health to all, Then Ile sit downe: Giue me some Wine, fill full: Enter Ghost. I drinke to th'generall ioy o'th'whole Table,
[1290]
And to our deere Friend Banquo, whom we misse: Would he were heere: to all, and him we thirst, And all to all.
Lords. Our duties, and the pledge. Mac. let the earth hide thee:
[1295]
Thy bones are marrowlesse, thy blood is cold: Thou hast no speculation in those eyes Which thou dost glare with.
La. Thinke of this good Peeres But as a thing of Custome: 'Tis no other,
[1300]
spoyles the pleasure of the time.
Macb. What man dare, I dare:

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Right Column


Approach thou like the rugged Russian Beare, The arm'd Rhinoceros, or th'Hircan Tiger, Take any shape but that, and my firme Nerues
[1305]
Shall neuer tremble. Or be aliue againe, And dare me to the Desart with thy Sword: If trembling I inhabit the , protest mee The Baby of a Girle. Hence horrible shadow, Vnreall mock'ry hence. Why so, being gone
[1310]
I am a man againe: pray you sit still.
La. You haue displac'd the mirth, Broke the good meeting, with most admir'd disorder. Macb. Can such things be, And ouercome vs like a Summers Clowd,
[1315]
Without our speciall wonder? You make me strange Euen to the disposition that I owe, When now I thinke you can behold such sights, And keepe the naturall Rubie of your Cheekes, When mine is blanch'd with feare.
Rosse.
[1320]
What sights, my Lord?
La. I pray you speake not: he growes worse & worse Question enrages him: at once, goodnight. Stand not vpon the order of your going, But go at once. Len.
[1325]
Good night, and better health Attend his Maiesty.
La. A kinde goodnight to all. Exit Lords. Macb. It will haue blood they say: Blood will haue Blood:
[1330]
Stones haue beene knowne to moue, & Trees to speake: Augures, and vnderstood Relations, haue By Maggot Pyes, & Choughes, & Rookes brought forth The secret'st man of Blood. What is the night?
La. Almost at oddes with morning, which is which. Macb.
[1335]
How say'st thou that Macduff denies his person At our great bidding.
La. Did you send to him Sir? Macb. I heare it by the way: But I will send: There's not a one of them but in his house
[1340]
I keepe a Seruant Feed. I will to morrow (And betimes I will) to the weyard Sisters. More shall they speake: for now I am bent to know By the worst meanes, the worst, for mine owne good, All causes shall giue way. I am in blood
[1345]
Stept in so farre, that should I wade no more, Returning were as tedious as go ore: Strange things I haue in head, that will to hand, Which must be acted, ere they may be scand.
La. You lacke the season of all Natures, sleepe. Macb.
[1350]
Come, wee'l to sleepe: My strange & self‑abuse Is the initiate feare, that wants hard vse: We are yet but yong indeed.
Exeunt.
Scena Quinta. [Act 3, Scene 5] Thunder. Enter the three Witches, meeting Hecat. 1. Why how now Hecat, you looke angerly? Hec. Haue I not reason (Beldams) as you are ?
[1355]
Sawcy, and ouer‑bold, how did you dare To Trade, and Trafficke with Macbeth, In Riddles, and Affaires of death; And

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Scena Quinta. [Act 3, Scene 5] Thunder. Enter the three Witches, meeting Hecat. 1. Why how now Hecat, you looke angerly? Hec. Haue I not reason (Beldams) as you are ?
[1355]
Sawcy, and ouer‑bold, how did you dare To Trade, and Trafficke with Macbeth, In Riddles, and Affaires of death; And I the Mistris of your Charmes, The close contriuer of all harmes,
[1360]
Was neuer call'd to beare my part, Or shew the glory of our Art? And which is worse, all you haue done Hath bene but for a wayward Sonne, Spightfull, and wrathfull, who (as others do)
[1365]
Loues for his owne ends, not for you. But make amends now: Get you gon, And at the pit of Acheron Meete me i'th'Morning: thither he Will come, to know his Destinie.
[1370]
Your Vessels, and your Spels prouide, Your Charmes, and euery thing beside; I am for th'Ayre: This night Ile spend Vnto a dismall, and a Fatall end. Great businesse must be wrought ere Noone.
[1375]
Vpon the Corner of the Moone There hangs a vap'rous drop, profound, Ile catch it ere it come to ground; And that distill'd by Magicke slights, Shall raise such Artificiall Sprights,
[1380]
As by the strength of their illusion, Shall draw him on to his Confusion. He shall spurne Fate, scorne Death, and beare His hopes 'boue Wisedome, Grace, and Feare: And you all know, Security
[1385]
Is Mortals cheefest Enemie. Musicke, and a Song. Hearke, I am call'd: my little Spirit see Sits in Foggy cloud, and stayes for me.
Sing within. Come away, come away, &c. 1 Come, let's make hast, shee'l soone be Backe againe. Exeunt.
 

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<div type="scene" n="5">
   <head rend="italic center">Scena Quinta.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 5]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="mixed">Thunder. Enter the three Witches, meeting
      <lb/>Hecat.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-mac-wit.1">
      <speaker>1.</speaker>
      <l n="1353">Why how now<hi rend="italic">Hecat</hi>, you looke angerly?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-mac-hec">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hec.</speaker>
      <l n="1354">Haue I not reason (Beldams) as you are<c rend="italic">?</c>
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      <l n="1355">Sawcy, and ouer‑bold, how did you dare</l>
      <l n="1356">To Trade, and Trafficke with<hi rend="italic">Macbeth</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1357">In Riddles, and Affaires of death;</l>
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      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="1358">And I the Mistris of your Charmes,</l>
      <l n="1359">The close contriuer of all harmes,</l>
      <l n="1360">Was neuer call'd to beare my part,</l>
      <l n="1361">Or shew the glory of our Art?</l>
      <l n="1362">And which is worse, all you haue done</l>
      <l n="1363">Hath bene but for a wayward Sonne,</l>
      <l n="1364">Spightfull, and wrathfull, who (as others do)</l>
      <l n="1365">Loues for his owne ends, not for you.</l>
      <l n="1366">But make amends now: Get you gon,</l>
      <l n="1367">And at the pit of Acheron</l>
      <l n="1368">Meete me i'th'Morning: thither he</l>
      <l n="1369">Will come, to know his Destinie.</l>
      <l n="1370">Your Vessels, and your Spels prouide,</l>
      <l n="1371">Your Charmes, and euery thing beside;</l>
      <l n="1372">I am for th'Ayre: This night Ile spend</l>
      <l n="1373">Vnto a dismall, and a Fatall end.</l>
      <l n="1374">Great businesse must be wrought ere Noone.</l>
      <l n="1375">Vpon the Corner of the Moone</l>
      <l n="1376">There hangs a vap'rous drop, profound,</l>
      <l n="1377">Ile catch it ere it come to ground;</l>
      <l n="1378">And that distill'd by Magicke slights,</l>
      <l n="1379">Shall raise such Artificiall Sprights,</l>
      <l n="1380">As by the strength of their illusion,</l>
      <l n="1381">Shall draw him on to his Confusion.</l>
      <l n="1382">He shall spurne Fate, scorne Death, and beare</l>
      <l n="1383">His hopes 'boue Wisedome, Grace, and Feare:</l>
      <l n="1384">And you all know, Security</l>
      <l n="1385">Is Mortals cheefest Enemie.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="business">Musicke, and a Song.</stage>
      <l n="1386">Hearke, I am call'd: my little Spirit see</l>
      <l n="1387">Sits in Foggy cloud, and stayes for me.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="business">Sing within. Come away, come away, &amp;c.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-mac-wit.1">
      <speaker>1</speaker>
      <l n="1388">Come, let's make hast, shee'l soone be</l>
      <l n="1389">Backe againe.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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