The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: c6r - Histories, p. 35

Left Column


The life and death of Richard the second.
[1425]
That they haue let the dangerous Enemie Measure our Confines with such peacefull steps? If we preuaile, their heads shall pay for it. I warrant they haue made peace with Bullingbrooke.
Scroope. Peace haue they made with him indeede (my Lord.) Rich.
[1430]
Oh Villains, Vipers, damn'd without redemption, Doggers, easily woon to fawne on any man, Snakes in my heart blood warm'd, that sting my heart, Three Iudasses, each one thrice worse then Iudas, Would they make peace? terrible Hell make warre
[1435]
Vpon their spotted Soules for this Offence.
Scroope. Sweet Loue (I see) changing his propertie, Turnes to the sowrest, and most deadly hate: Againe vncurse their Soules; their peace is made With Heads, and not with Hands: those whom you curse
[1440]
Haue felt the worst of Deaths destroying hand, And lye full low, grau'd in the hollow ground.
Aum. Is Bushie, Greene, and the Earle of Wiltshire dead? Scroope. Yea, all of them at Bristow lost their heads. Aum. Where is the Duke my Father with his Power? Rich.
[1445]
No matter where; of comfort no man speake: Let's talke of Graues, of Wormes, and Epitaphs, Make Dust our Paper, and with Raynie eyes Write Sorrow on the Bosome of the Earth. Let's chuse Executors, and talke of Wills:
[1450]
And yet not so; for what can we bequeath, Saue our deposed bodies to the ground ? Our Lands, our Liues, and all are Bullingbrookes, And nothing can we call our owne, but Death, And that small Modell of the barren Earth,
[1455]
Which serves as Paste, and Couer to our Bones: For Heauens sake let vs sit vpon the ground, And tell sad stories of the death of Kings: How some haue been depos'd, some slaine in warre, Some haunted by the Ghosts they haue depos'd,
[1460]
Some poyson'd by their Wiues, some sleeping kill'd, All murther'd. For within the hollow Crowne That rounds the mortall Temples of a King, Keepes Death his Court, and there the Antique sits Scoffing his State, and grinning at his Pompe,
[1465]
Allowing him a breath, a little Scene, To Monarchize, be fear'd, and kill with lookes, Infusing him with selfe and vaine conceit, As if this Flesh, which walls about our Life, Were Brasse impregnable: and humor'd thus,
[1470]
Comes at the last, and with a little Pinne Bores though his Castle Walls, and farwell King. Couer your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With solemne Reuerence: throw away Respect, Tradition, Forme, and Ceremonious dutie,
[1475]
For you haue but mistooke me all this while: I liue with Bread like you, feele Want, Taste Griefe, need Friends: subiected thus, How can you say to me, I am a King?
Carl. My Lord, wise men ne're waile their present woes,
[1480]
But presently preuent the wayes to waile: to feare the Foe, since feare oppresseth strength, Giues in your weakenesse, strength vnto your Foe; Feare, and be slaine, no worse can come to fight; And fight and die, is death destroying death,
[1485]
Where fearing, dying, payes death seruile breath.
Aum. My Father hath a Power, enquire of him, And learne to make a Body of a Limbe. Rich. Thou chid'st me well: proud Bullingbrooke I come

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Right Column


To change Blowes with thee, for our day of Doome:
[1490]
This ague fit of feare is ouer‑blowne, An easie taske it is to winne our owne. Say Scroope, where lyes our Vnckle with his Power? Speake sweetly man, although thy lookes be sowre.
Scroope. Men iudge by the complexion of the Skie
[1495]
The state and inclination of the day; So may you by my dull and heauie Eye: My Tongue hath but a heauier Tale to say: I play the Torturer, by small and small To lengthen out the worst, that must be spoken.
[1500]
Your Vnckle Yorke is ioyn'd with Bullingbrooke, And all your Northerne Castles yeelded vp, And all your Southerne Gentlemen in Armes Vpon his Faction.
Rich. Thou hast said enough.
[1505]
Beshrew thee Cousin, which didst lead me forth Of that sweet way I was in, to despaire: What say you now? What comfort haue we now? By Heauen Ile hate him euerlastingly, That bids me be of comfort any more.
[1510]
Goe to Flint Castle, there Ile pine away, A King, Woes slaue, shall Kingly Woe obey: That Power I haue, discharge, and let 'em goe To eare the Land, that hath some hope to grow, For I haue none. Let no man speake againe
[1515]
To alter this, for counsaile is but vaine.
Aum. My Liege, one word. Rich. He does me double wrong, That wounds me with the flatteries of his tongue. Discharge my followers: let them hence away,
[1520]
From Richards Night, to Bullingbrookes faire Day.
Exeunt.
Scæna Tertia. [Act 3, Scene 3] Enter with Drum and Colours, Bullingbrooke, Yorke, Northumberland, Attendants. Bull. So that by this intelligence we learne The Welchmen are dispers'd, and Salisbury Is gone to meet the King, who lately landed With some few priuate friends, vpon this Coast. North.
[1525]
The newes is very faire and good, my Lord, Richard, not farre from hence, hath hid his head.
York. It would beseeme the Lord Northumberland, To say King Richard: alack the heauie day, When such a sacred King should hide his head. North.
[1530]
Your Grace mistakes: onely to be briefe, Left I this Title out.
York. The time hath beene, Would you haue beene so briefe with him, he would Haue beene so briefe with you, to shorten you,
[1535]
For taking so the Head, your whole heads length.
Bull. Mistake not (Vnckle) farther then you should. York. Take not (good Cousin) farther then you should. Least you mistake the Heauens are ore your head. Bull. I know it (Vnckle) and oppose not my selfe
[1540]
Against their will. But who comes here? Enter Percie. Welcome Harry: what, will not this Castle yeeld ?
Per. The Castle royally is mann'd, my Lord, Against thy entrance. Bull. Roy­

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Scæna Tertia. [Act 3, Scene 3] Enter with Drum and Colours, Bullingbrooke, Yorke, Northumberland, Attendants. Bull. So that by this intelligence we learne The Welchmen are dispers'd, and Salisbury Is gone to meet the King, who lately landed With some few priuate friends, vpon this Coast. North.
[1525]
The newes is very faire and good, my Lord, Richard, not farre from hence, hath hid his head.
York. It would beseeme the Lord Northumberland, To say King Richard: alack the heauie day, When such a sacred King should hide his head. North.
[1530]
Your Grace mistakes: onely to be briefe, Left I this Title out.
York. The time hath beene, Would you haue beene so briefe with him, he would Haue beene so briefe with you, to shorten you,
[1535]
For taking so the Head, your whole heads length.
Bull. Mistake not (Vnckle) farther then you should. York. Take not (good Cousin) farther then you should. Least you mistake the Heauens are ore your head. Bull. I know it (Vnckle) and oppose not my selfe
[1540]
Against their will. But who comes here? Enter Percie. Welcome Harry: what, will not this Castle yeeld ?
Per. The Castle royally is mann'd, my Lord, Against thy entrance. Bull. Royally? Why, it containes no King? Per.
[1545]
Yes (my good Lord) It doth containe a King: King Richard lyes Within the limits of yond Lime and Stone, And with him, the Lord Aumerle, Lord Salisbury, Sir Stephen Scroope, besides a Clergie man
[1550]
Of holy reuerence; who, I cannot learne.
North. Oh, belike it is the Bishop of Carlile. Bull. Noble Lord, Goe to the rude Ribs of that ancient Castle, Through Brazen Trumpet send the breath of Parle
[1555]
Into his ruin'd Eares, and thus deliuer: Henry Bullingbrooke vpon his knees doth kisse King Richards hand, and sends allegeance And true faith of heart to his Royall Person: hither come Euen at his feet, to lay my Armes and Power,
[1560]
Prouided, that my Banishment repeal'd, And Lands restor'd againe, be freely graunted: If not, Ile vse th'aduantage of my Power, And lay the Summers dust with showers of blood, Rayn'd from the wounds of slaughter'd Englishmen;
[1565]
The which, how farre off from the mind of Bullingbrooke It is, such Crimson Tempest should bedrench The fresh greene Lap of faire King Richards Land, My stooping dutie tenderly shall shew. Goe signifie as much, while here we march
[1570]
Vpon the Grassie Carpet of this Plaine: Let's march without the noyse of threatning Drum, That from this Castles tatter'd Battlements Our faire Appointments may be well perus'd. Me thinkes King Richard and my selfe should meet
[1575]
With no lesse terror then the Elements Of Fire and Water, when their thundring smoake At meeting teares the cloudie Cheekes of Heauen: Be he the fire, Ile be the yeelding Water; The Rage be his, while on the Earth I raine
[1580]
My Waters on the Earth, and not on him. March on, and marke King Richard how he lookes. Parle without, and answere within: then a Flourish. Enter on the Walls, Richard, Carlile, Aumerle, Scroop, Salisbury. See, see, King Richard doth himselfe appeare As doth the blushing discontented Sunne, From out the fierie Portall of the East,
[1585]
When he perceiues the enuious Clouds are bent To dimme his glory, and to staine the tract Of his bright passage to the Occident.
York. Yet lookes he like a King: behold his Eye (As bright as is the Eagles) lightens forth
[1590]
Controlling Maiestie: alack, alack, for woe, That any harme should staine so faire a shew.
Rich. Wee are amaz'd, and thus long haue we stood To watch the fearefull bending of thy knee, Because we thought our selfe thy lawfull King:
[1595]
And if we be, how dare thy ioynts forget To pay their awfull dutie to our presence? If we be not, shew vs the Hand of God, That hath dismiss'd vs from our Stewardship, For well wee know, no Hand of Blood and Bone
[1600]
Can gripe the sacred Handle of our Scepter, Vnlesse he doe prophane, steale, or vsurpe. And though you thinke, that all, as you haue done, Haue torne their Soules, by turning them from vs, And we are barren, and bereft of Friends:
[1605]
Yet know, my Master, God Omnipotent, Is mustring in his Clouds, on our behalfe, Armies of Pestilence, and they shall strike Your Children yet vnborne, and vnbegot, That lift your Vassall Hands against my Head,
[1610]
And threat the Glory of my precious Crowne. Tell Bullingbrooke, for yond me thinkes he is, That euery stride he makes vpon my Land, Is dangerous Treason: He is come to ope The purple Testament of bleeding Warre;
[1615]
But ere the Crowne he looks for, liue in peace, Ten thousand bloody crownes of Mothers Sonnes Shall ill become the flower of Englands face, Change the complexion of her Maid‑pale Peace To Scarlet Indignation, and bedew
[1620]
Her Pastors Grasse with faithfull English Blood.
North. The King of Heauen forbid our Lord the King Should so with ciuill and vnciuill Armes Be rush'd vpon: Thy thrice‑noble Cousin, Harry Bullingbrooke, doth humbly kisse thy hand,
[1625]
And by the Honorable Tombe he sweares, That stands vpon your Royall Grandsires Bones, And by the Royalties of both your Bloods, (Currents that spring from one most gracious Head) And by the buried Hand of Warlike Gaunt,
[1630]
And by the Worth and Honor of himselfe, Comprising all that may be sworne, or said, His comming hither hath no further scope, Then for his Lineall Royalties, and to begge Infranchisement immediate on his knees:
[1635]
Which on thy Royall partie graunted once, His glittering Armes he will commend to'Rust, His barbed Steedes to Stables, and his heart To faithfull seruice of your Maiestie: This sweares he, as he is a Prince, is iust,
[1640]
And as I am Gentleman, I credit him.
Rich. Northumberland, say thus: The King returnes, His Noble Cousin is right welcome hither, And all the number of his faire demands Shall be accomplish'd without contradiction:
[1645]
With all the gracious vtterance thou hast, Speake to his gentle hearing kind commends. We doe debase our selfe (Cousin) doe we not, To looke so poorely, and to speake so faire? Shall we call back Northumberland, and send
[1650]
Defiance to the Traytor, and so die?
Aum. No, good my Lord, let's fight with gentle words, Till time lend friends, and friends their helpeful Swords. Rich. Oh God, oh God, that ere this tongue of mine, That layd the Sentence of dread Banishment
[1655]
On yond prowd man, should take it off againe With words of sooth: Oh that I were as great As is my Griefe, or lesser then my Name, Or that I could forget what I haue beene, Or not remember what I must be now:
[1660]
Swell'st thou prowd heart? Ile giue thee scope to beat, Since Foes haue scope to beat both thee and me.
Aum. Northumberland comes backe from Bulling­ brooke . Rich. What must the King doe now? must he submit? The King shall doe it: Must he be depos'd?
[1665]
The King shall be contented: Must he loose The Name of King ? o' Gods Name let it goe. Ile giue my Iewels for a sett of Beades, My gorgeous Pallace, for a Hermitage, My gay Apparrell, for an Almes‑mans Gowne,
[1670]
My figur'd Goblets, for a Dish of Wood, My Scepter, for a Palmers walking Staffe, My Subiects, for a payre of carued Saints, And my large Kingdome, for a little Graue, A little little Graue, an obscure Graue.
[1675]
Or Ile be buryed in the Kings high‑way, Some way of common Trade, where Subiects feet May howrely trample on their Soueraignes Head: For on my heart they tread now, whilest I liue; And buryed once, why not vpon my Head ?
[1680]
Aumerle, thou weep'st (my tender‑hearted Cousin) Wee'le make foule Weather with despised Teares: Our sighes, and they, shall lodge the Summer Corne, And make a Dearth in this reuolting Land. Or shall we play the Wantons with our Woes,
[1685]
And make some prettie Match, with shedding Teares? As thus: to drop them still vpon one place, Till they haue fretted vs a payre of Graues, Within the Earth: and therein lay'd, there lyes Two Kinsmen, digg'd their Graues with weeping Eyes?
[1690]
Would not this ill, doe well? Well, well, I see I talke but idly, and you mock at mee. Most mightie Prince, my Lord Northumberland, What sayes King Bullingbrooke? Will his Maiestie Giue Richard leaue to liue, till Richard die?
[1695]
You make a Legge, and Bullingbrooke sayes I.
North. My Lord, in the base Court he doth attend To speake with you, may it please you to come downe. Rich. Downe, downe I come, like glist'ring Phaeton, Wanting the manage of vnruly Iades.
[1700]
In the base Court? base Court, where Kings grow base, To come at Traytors Calls, and doe them Grace. In the base Court come down: down Court, down King, For night‑Owls shrike, where moūtingmounting Larks should sing.
Bull. What says his Maiestie? North.
[1705]
Sorrow, and griefe of heart Makes him speake fondly, like a frantick man: Yet he is come.
Bull. Stand all apart, And shew faire dutie to his Maiestie.
[1710]
My gracious Lord.
Rich. Faire Cousin, You debase your Princely Knee, To make the base Earth prowd with kissing it. Me rather had, my Heart might feele your Loue,
[1715]
Then my vnpleas'd Eye see your Courtesie. Vp Cousin, vp, your Heart is vp, I know, Thus high at least, although your Knee be low.
Bull. My gracious Lord, I come but for mine owne. Rich. Your owne is yours, and I am yours, and all. Bull.
[1720]
So farre be mine, my most redoubted Lord, As my true seruice shall deserue your loue.
Rich. Well you deseru'd: They well deserue to haue, That know the strong'st, and surest way to get.
[1725]
Vnckle giue me your Hand: nay, drie your Eyes, Teares shew their Loue, but want their Remedies. Cousin, I am too young to be your Father, Though you are old enough to be my Heire. What you will haue, Ile giue, and willing to,
[1730]
For doe we must, what force will haue vs doe. Set on towards London: Cousin, is it so?
Bull. Yea, my good Lord. Rich. Then I must not say, no. Flourish. Exeunt.
 

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<div type="scene" n="3">
   <head rend="italic center">Scæna Tertia.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 3]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter with Drum and Colours, Bullingbrooke,
      <lb/>Yorke, Northumberland, Attendants.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1521">So that by this intelligence we learne</l>
      <l n="1522">The Welchmen are dispers'd, and<hi rend="italic">Salisbury</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="1523">Is gone to meet the King, who lately landed</l>
      <l n="1524">With some few priuate friends, vpon this Coast.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-nor">
      <speaker rend="italic">North.</speaker>
      <l n="1525">The newes is very faire and good, my Lord,</l>
      <l n="1526">
         <hi rend="italic">Richard</hi>, not farre from hence, hath hid his head.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-yor">
      <speaker rend="italic">York.</speaker>
      <l n="1527">It would beseeme the Lord Northumberland,</l>
      <l n="1528">To say King<hi rend="italic">Richard:</hi>alack the heauie day,</l>
      <l n="1529">When such a sacred King should hide his head.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-nor">
      <speaker rend="italic">North.</speaker>
      <l n="1530">Your Grace mistakes: onely to be briefe,</l>
      <l n="1531">Left I this Title out.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-yor">
      <speaker rend="italic">York.</speaker>
      <l n="1532">The time hath beene,</l>
      <l n="1533">Would you haue beene so briefe with him, he would</l>
      <l n="1534">Haue beene so briefe with you, to shorten you,</l>
      <l n="1535">For taking so the Head, your whole heads length.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1536">Mistake not (Vnckle) farther then you should.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-yor">
      <speaker rend="italic">York.</speaker>
      <l n="1537">Take not (good Cousin) farther then you should.</l>
      <l n="1538">Least you mistake the Heauens are ore your head.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1539">I know it (Vnckle) and oppose not my selfe</l>
      <l n="1540">Against their will. But who comes here?</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Percie.</stage>
      <l n="1541">Welcome<hi rend="italic">Harry:</hi>what, will not this Castle yeeld<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-per">
      <speaker rend="italic">Per.</speaker>
      <l n="1542">The Castle royally is mann'd, my Lord,</l>
      <l n="1543">Against thy entrance.</l>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0360-0.jpg" n="36"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1544">Royally? Why, it containes no King?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-per">
      <speaker rend="italic">Per.</speaker>
      <l n="1545">Yes (my good Lord)</l>
      <l n="1546">It doth containe a King: King<hi rend="italic">Richard</hi>lyes</l>
      <l n="1547">Within the limits of yond Lime and Stone,</l>
      <l n="1548">And with him, the Lord<hi rend="italic">Aumerle</hi>, Lord<hi rend="italic">Salisbury</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1549">Sir<hi rend="italic">Stephen Scroope</hi>, besides a Clergie man</l>
      <l n="1550">Of holy reuerence; who, I cannot learne.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-nor">
      <speaker rend="italic">North.</speaker>
      <l n="1551">Oh, belike it is the Bishop of Carlile.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1552">Noble Lord,</l>
      <l n="1553">Goe to the rude Ribs of that ancient Castle,</l>
      <l n="1554">Through Brazen Trumpet send the breath of Parle</l>
      <l n="1555">Into his ruin'd Eares, and thus deliuer:</l>
      <l n="1556">
         <hi rend="italic">Henry Bullingbrooke</hi>vpon his knees doth kisse</l>
      <l n="1557">King<hi rend="italic">Richards</hi>hand, and sends allegeance</l>
      <l n="1558">And true faith of heart to his Royall Person: hither come</l>
      <l n="1559">Euen at his feet, to lay my Armes and Power,</l>
      <l n="1560">Prouided, that my Banishment repeal'd,</l>
      <l n="1561">And Lands restor'd againe, be freely graunted:</l>
      <l n="1562">If not, Ile vse th'aduantage of my Power,</l>
      <l n="1563">And lay the Summers dust with showers of blood,</l>
      <l n="1564">Rayn'd from the wounds of slaughter'd Englishmen;</l>
      <l n="1565">The which, how farre off from the mind of<hi rend="italic">Bullingbrooke</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="1566">It is, such Crimson Tempest should bedrench</l>
      <l n="1567">The fresh greene Lap of faire King<hi rend="italic">Richards</hi>Land,</l>
      <l n="1568">My stooping dutie tenderly shall shew.</l>
      <l n="1569">Goe signifie as much, while here we march</l>
      <l n="1570">Vpon the Grassie Carpet of this Plaine:</l>
      <l n="1571">Let's march without the noyse of threatning Drum,</l>
      <l n="1572">That from this Castles tatter'd Battlements</l>
      <l n="1573">Our faire Appointments may be well perus'd.</l>
      <l n="1574">Me thinkes King<hi rend="italic">Richard</hi>and my selfe should meet</l>
      <l n="1575">With no lesse terror then the Elements</l>
      <l n="1576">Of Fire and Water, when their thundring smoake</l>
      <l n="1577">At meeting teares the cloudie Cheekes of Heauen:</l>
      <l n="1578">Be he the fire, Ile be the yeelding Water;</l>
      <l n="1579">The Rage be his, while on the Earth I raine</l>
      <l n="1580">My Waters on the Earth, and not on him.</l>
      <l n="1581">March on, and marke King<hi rend="italic">Richard</hi>how he lookes.</l>
      <stage rend="italic" type="entrance">Parle without, and answere within: then a Flourish.
      <lb/>Enter on the Walls, Richard, Carlile, Aumerle, Scroop,
      <lb/>Salisbury.</stage>
      <l n="1582">See, see, King<hi rend="italic">Richard</hi>doth himselfe appeare</l>
      <l n="1583">As doth the blushing discontented Sunne,</l>
      <l n="1584">From out the fierie Portall of the East,</l>
      <l n="1585">When he perceiues the enuious Clouds are bent</l>
      <l n="1586">To dimme his glory, and to staine the tract</l>
      <l n="1587">Of his bright passage to the Occident.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-yor">
      <speaker rend="italic">York.</speaker>
      <l n="1588">Yet lookes he like a King: behold his Eye</l>
      <l n="1589">(As bright as is the Eagles) lightens forth</l>
      <l n="1590">Controlling Maiestie: alack, alack, for woe,</l>
      <l n="1591">That any harme should staine so faire a shew.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1592">Wee are amaz'd, and thus long haue we stood</l>
      <l n="1593">To watch the fearefull bending of thy knee,</l>
      <l n="1594">Because we thought our selfe thy lawfull King:</l>
      <l n="1595">And if we be, how dare thy ioynts forget</l>
      <l n="1596">To pay their awfull dutie to our presence?</l>
      <l n="1597">If we be not, shew vs the Hand of God,</l>
      <l n="1598">That hath dismiss'd vs from our Stewardship,</l>
      <l n="1599">For well wee know, no Hand of Blood and Bone</l>
      <l n="1600">Can gripe the sacred Handle of our Scepter,</l>
      <l n="1601">Vnlesse he doe prophane, steale, or vsurpe.</l>
      <l n="1602">And though you thinke, that all, as you haue done,</l>
      <l n="1603">Haue torne their Soules, by turning them from vs,</l>
      <l n="1604">And we are barren, and bereft of Friends:</l>
      <l n="1605">Yet know, my Master, God Omnipotent,</l>
      <l n="1606">Is mustring in his Clouds, on our behalfe,</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="1607">Armies of Pestilence, and they shall strike</l>
      <l n="1608">Your Children yet vnborne, and vnbegot,</l>
      <l n="1609">That lift your Vassall Hands against my Head,</l>
      <l n="1610">And threat the Glory of my precious Crowne.</l>
      <l n="1611">Tell<hi rend="italic">Bullingbrooke</hi>, for yond me thinkes he is,</l>
      <l n="1612">That euery stride he makes vpon my Land,</l>
      <l n="1613">Is dangerous Treason: He is come to ope</l>
      <l n="1614">The purple Testament of bleeding Warre;</l>
      <l n="1615">But ere the Crowne he looks for, liue in peace,</l>
      <l n="1616">Ten thousand bloody crownes of Mothers Sonnes</l>
      <l n="1617">Shall ill become the flower of Englands face,</l>
      <l n="1618">Change the complexion of her Maid‑pale Peace</l>
      <l n="1619">To Scarlet Indignation, and bedew</l>
      <l n="1620">Her Pastors Grasse with faithfull English Blood.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-nor">
      <speaker rend="italic">North.</speaker>
      <l n="1621">The King of Heauen forbid our Lord the King</l>
      <l n="1622">Should so with ciuill and vnciuill Armes</l>
      <l n="1623">Be rush'd vpon: Thy thrice‑noble Cousin,</l>
      <l n="1624">
         <hi rend="italic">Harry Bullingbrooke</hi>, doth humbly kisse thy hand,</l>
      <l n="1625">And by the Honorable Tombe he sweares,</l>
      <l n="1626">That stands vpon your Royall Grandsires Bones,</l>
      <l n="1627">And by the Royalties of both your Bloods,</l>
      <l n="1628">(Currents that spring from one most gracious Head)</l>
      <l n="1629">And by the buried Hand of Warlike<hi rend="italic">Gaunt</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1630">And by the Worth and Honor of himselfe,</l>
      <l n="1631">Comprising all that may be sworne, or said,</l>
      <l n="1632">His comming hither hath no further scope,</l>
      <l n="1633">Then for his Lineall Royalties, and to begge</l>
      <l n="1634">Infranchisement immediate on his knees:</l>
      <l n="1635">Which on thy Royall partie graunted once,</l>
      <l n="1636">His glittering Armes he will commend to'Rust,</l>
      <l n="1637">His barbed Steedes to Stables, and his heart</l>
      <l n="1638">To faithfull seruice of your Maiestie:</l>
      <l n="1639">This sweares he, as he is a Prince, is iust,</l>
      <l n="1640">And as I am Gentleman, I credit him.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1641">
         <hi rend="italic">Northumberland</hi>, say thus: The King returnes,</l>
      <l n="1642">His Noble Cousin is right welcome hither,</l>
      <l n="1643">And all the number of his faire demands</l>
      <l n="1644">Shall be accomplish'd without contradiction:</l>
      <l n="1645">With all the gracious vtterance thou hast,</l>
      <l n="1646">Speake to his gentle hearing kind commends.</l>
      <l n="1647">We doe debase our selfe (Cousin) doe we not,</l>
      <l n="1648">To looke so poorely, and to speake so faire?</l>
      <l n="1649">Shall we call back<hi rend="italic">Northumberland</hi>, and send</l>
      <l n="1650">Defiance to the Traytor, and so die?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-aum">
      <speaker rend="italic">Aum.</speaker>
      <l n="1651">No, good my Lord, let's fight with gentle words,</l>
      <l n="1652">Till time lend friends, and friends their helpeful Swords.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1653">Oh God, oh God, that ere this tongue of mine,</l>
      <l n="1654">That layd the Sentence of dread Banishment</l>
      <l n="1655">On yond prowd man, should take it off againe</l>
      <l n="1656">With words of sooth: Oh that I were as great</l>
      <l n="1657">As is my Griefe, or lesser then my Name,</l>
      <l n="1658">Or that I could forget what I haue beene,</l>
      <l n="1659">Or not remember what I must be now:</l>
      <l n="1660">Swell'st thou prowd heart? Ile giue thee scope to beat,</l>
      <l n="1661">Since Foes haue scope to beat both thee and me.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-aum">
      <speaker rend="italic">Aum.</speaker>
      <l n="1662">
         <hi rend="italic">Northumberland</hi>comes backe from<hi rend="italic">Bulling­
      <lb/>brooke</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1663">What must the King doe now? must he submit?</l>
      <l n="1664">The King shall doe it: Must he be depos'd?</l>
      <l n="1665">The King shall be contented: Must he loose</l>
      <l n="1666">The Name of King<c rend="italic">?</c>o' Gods Name let it goe.</l>
      <l n="1667">Ile giue my Iewels for a sett of Beades,</l>
      <l n="1668">My gorgeous Pallace, for a Hermitage,</l>
      <l n="1669">My gay Apparrell, for an Almes‑mans Gowne,</l>
      <l n="1670">My figur'd Goblets, for a Dish of Wood,</l>
      <l n="1671">My Scepter, for a Palmers walking Staffe,</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0361-0.jpg" n="37"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="1672">My Subiects, for a payre of carued Saints,</l>
      <l n="1673">And my large Kingdome, for a little Graue,</l>
      <l n="1674">A little little Graue, an obscure Graue.</l>
      <l n="1675">Or Ile be buryed in the Kings high‑way,</l>
      <l n="1676">Some way of common Trade, where Subiects feet</l>
      <l n="1677">May howrely trample on their Soueraignes Head:</l>
      <l n="1678">For on my heart they tread now, whilest I liue;</l>
      <l n="1679">And buryed once, why not vpon my Head<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
      <l n="1680">
         <hi rend="italic">Aumerle</hi>, thou weep'st (my tender‑hearted Cousin)</l>
      <l n="1681">Wee'le make foule Weather with despised Teares:</l>
      <l n="1682">Our sighes, and they, shall lodge the Summer Corne,</l>
      <l n="1683">And make a Dearth in this reuolting Land.</l>
      <l n="1684">Or shall we play the Wantons with our Woes,</l>
      <l n="1685">And make some prettie Match, with shedding Teares?</l>
      <l n="1686">As thus: to drop them still vpon one place,</l>
      <l n="1687">Till they haue fretted vs a payre of Graues,</l>
      <l n="1688">Within the Earth: and therein lay'd, there lyes</l>
      <l n="1689">Two Kinsmen, digg'd their Graues with weeping Eyes?</l>
      <l n="1690">Would not this ill, doe well? Well, well, I see</l>
      <l n="1691">I talke but idly, and you mock at mee.</l>
      <l n="1692">Most mightie Prince, my Lord<hi rend="italic">Northumberland</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1693">What sayes King<hi rend="italic">Bullingbrooke</hi>? Will his Maiestie</l>
      <l n="1694">Giue<hi rend="italic">Richard</hi>leaue to liue, till<hi rend="italic">Richard</hi>die?</l>
      <l n="1695">You make a Legge, and<hi rend="italic">Bullingbrooke</hi>sayes I.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-nor">
      <speaker rend="italic">North.</speaker>
      <l n="1696">My Lord, in the base Court he doth attend</l>
      <l n="1697">To speake with you, may it please you to come downe.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1698">Downe, downe I come, like glist'ring<hi rend="italic">Phaeton</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1699">Wanting the manage of vnruly Iades.</l>
      <l n="1700">In the base Court? base Court, where Kings grow base,</l>
      <l n="1701">To come at Traytors Calls, and doe them Grace.</l>
      <l n="1702">In the base Court come down: down Court, down King,</l>
      <l n="1703">For night‑Owls shrike, where<choice>
            <abbr>moūting</abbr>
            <expan>mounting</expan>
         </choice>Larks should sing.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1704">What says his Maiestie?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-nor">
      <speaker rend="italic">North.</speaker>
      <l n="1705">Sorrow, and griefe of heart</l>
      <l n="1706">Makes him speake fondly, like a frantick man:</l>
      <l n="1707">Yet he is come.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1708">Stand all apart,</l>
      <l n="1709">And shew faire dutie to his Maiestie.</l>
      <l n="1710">My gracious Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1711">Faire Cousin,</l>
      <l n="1712">You debase your Princely Knee,</l>
      <l n="1713">To make the base Earth prowd with kissing it.</l>
      <l n="1714">Me rather had, my Heart might feele your Loue,</l>
      <l n="1715">Then my vnpleas'd Eye see your Courtesie.</l>
      <l n="1716">Vp Cousin, vp, your Heart is vp, I know,</l>
      <l n="1717">Thus high at least, although your Knee be low.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1718">My gracious Lord, I come but for mine
      <lb/>owne.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1719">Your owne is yours, and I am yours, and
      <lb/>all.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1720">So farre be mine, my most redoubted Lord,</l>
      <l n="1721">As my true seruice shall deserue your loue.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1722">Well you deseru'd:</l>
      <l n="1723">They well deserue to haue,</l>
      <l n="1724">That know the strong'st, and surest way to get.</l>
      <l n="1725">Vnckle giue me your Hand: nay, drie your Eyes,</l>
      <l n="1726">Teares shew their Loue, but want their Remedies.</l>
      <l n="1727">Cousin, I am too young to be your Father,</l>
      <l n="1728">Though you are old enough to be my Heire.</l>
      <l n="1729">What you will haue, Ile giue, and willing to,</l>
      <l n="1730">For doe we must, what force will haue vs doe.</l>
      <l n="1731">Set on towards London:</l>
      <l n="1732">Cousin, is it so?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-bol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bull.</speaker>
      <l n="1733">Yea, my good Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-r2-ric">
      <speaker rend="italic">Rich.</speaker>
      <l n="1734">Then I must not say, no.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="mixed">Flourish. Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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