The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: ff3r - Tragedies, p. 65

Left Column


The Tragedie of Romeo and Iuliet. I haue it, and soundly to your Houses. Exit. Rom.
[1495]
This Gentleman the Princes neere Alie, My very Friend hath got his mortall hurt In my behalfe, my reputation stain'd With Tibalts slaunder, Tybalt that an houre Hath beene my Cozin: O Sweet Iuliet,
[1500]
Thy Beauty hath made me Effeminate, And in my temper softned Valours steele.
Enter Benuolio. Ben. O Romeo, Romeo, braue Mercutio's is dead, That Gallant spirit hath aspir'd the Cloudes, Which too vntimely here did scorne the earth. Rom.
[1505]
This daies blacke Fate, on mo daies doth depend, This but begins, the wo others must end.
Enter Tybalt. Ben. Here comes the Furious Tybalt backe againe. Rom. He gon in triumph, and Mercutio slaine? Away to heauen respectiue Lenitie,
[1510]
And fire and Fury, be my conduct now. Now Tybalt take the Villaine backe againe That late thou gau'st me, for Mercutios soule Is but a little way aboue our heads, Staying for thine to keepe him companie:
[1515]
Either thou or I, or both, must goe with him.
Tib. Thou wretched Boy that didst consort him here, Shalt with him hence. Rom. This shall determine that. They fight. Tybalt falles. Ben. Romeo, away be gone:
[1520]
The Citizens are vp, and Tybalt slaine, Stand not amaz'd, the Prince will Doome thee death If thou art taken: hence, be gone, away.
Rom. O! I am Fortunes foole. Ben. Why dost thou stay? Exit Romeo. Enter Citizens. Citi.
[1525]
Which way ran he that kild Mercutio? Tibalt that Murtherer, which way ran he?
Ben. There lies that Tybalt. Citi. Vp sir go with me: I charge thee in the Princes names obey. Enter Prince, old Montague, Capulet, their Wiues and all. Prin.
[1530]
Where are the vile beginners of this Fray?
Ben. O Noble Prince, I can discouer all The vnluckie Mannage of this fatall brall: There lies the man slaine by young Romeo, That slew thy kinsman braue Mercutio. Cap. Wi.
[1535]
Tybalt, my Cozin? O my Brothers Child, O Prince, O Cozin, Husband, O the blood is spild Of my deare kinsman. Prince as thou art true, For bloud of ours, shed bloud of Mountague. O Cozin, Cozin.
Prin.
[1540]
Benuolio, who began this Fray?
Ben. Tybalt here slaine, whom Romeo's hand slay, Romeo that spoke him faire, bid him bethinke How nice the Quarrell was, and vrg'd withall Your high displeasure: all this vttered,
[1545]
With gentle breath, calme looke, knees humbly bow'd Could not take truce with the vnruly spleene Of Tybalts deafe to peace, but that he Tilts With Peircing steele at bold Mercutio's breast, Who all as hot, turnes deadly point to point,
[1550]
And with a Martiall scorne, with one hand beates Cold death aside, and with the other sends It back to Tybalt, whose dexterity

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Right Column


Retorts it: Romeo he cries aloud, Hold Friends, Friends part, and swifter then his tongue,
[1555]
His aged arme beats downe their fatall points, And twixt them rushes, vnderneath whose arme, An enuious thrust from Tybalt, hit the life Of stout Mercutio, and then Tybalt fled. But by and by comes backe to Romeo,
[1560]
Who had but newly entertained Reuenge, And too't they goe like lightning, for ere I Could draw to part them, was stout Tybalt slaine: And as he fell, did Romeo turne and flie: This is the truth, or let Benuolio die.
Cap. Wi.
[1565]
He is a kinsman to the Mountague, Affection makes him false, he speakes not true: Some twenty of them fought in this blacke strife, And all those twenty could but kill one life. I beg for Iustice, which thou Prince must giue:
[1570]
Romeo slew Tybalt, Romeo must not liue.
Prin. Romeo slew him, he slew Mercutio, Who now the price of his deare blood doth owe. Cap. Not Romeo Prince, he was Mercutios Friend, His fault concludes, but what the law should end,
[1575]
The life of Tybalt.
Prin. And for that offence, Immediately we doe exile him hence: I haue an interest in your hearts proceeding: My bloud for your rude brawles doth lie a bleeding.
[1580]
But Ile Amerce you with so strong a fine, That you shall all repent the losse of mine. It will be deafe to pleading and excuses, Nor teares, nor prayers shall purchase our abuses. Therefore vse none, let Romeo hence in hast,
[1585]
Else when he is found, that houre is his last. Beare hence his body, and attend our will: Mercy not Murders, pardoning those that kill.
Exeunt.
[Act 3, Scene 2] Enter Iuliet alone. Iul. Gallop apace, you fiery footed fteedes steedes , Towards Phæbus lodging, such a Wagoner
[1590]
As Phaeton would whip you to the west, And bring in Cloudie night immediately. Spred thy close Curtaine Loue‑performing night, That run‑awayes eyes may wincke, and Romeo Leape to these armes, vntalkt of and vnseene,
[1595]
Louers can see to doe their Amorous rights, And by their owne Beauties: or if Loue be blind, It best agrees with night: come ciuill night, Thou sober suted Matron all in blacke, And learne me how to loose a winning match,
[1600]
Plaid for a paire of stainlesse Maidenhoods, Hood my vnman'd blood bayting in my Cheekes, With thy Blacke mantle, till strange Loue grow bold, Thinke true Loue acted simple modestie: Come night, come Romeo, come thou day in night,
[1605]
For thou wilt lie vpon the wings of night Whiter then new Snow vpon a Rauens backe: Come gentle night, come louing blackebrow'd night. Giue me my Romeo, and when I shall die, Take him and cut him out in little starres,
[1610]
And he will make the Face of heauen so fine, That all the world will be in Loue with night, And pay no worship to the Garish Sun. O I haue bought the Mansion of a Loue, But not possest it, and though I am sold,
[1615]
Not yet enioy'd, so tedious is this day, As is the night before some Festiuall, ff3 To

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[Act 3, Scene 2] Enter Iuliet alone. Iul. Gallop apace, you fiery footed fteedes steedes , Towards Phæbus lodging, such a Wagoner
[1590]
As Phaeton would whip you to the west, And bring in Cloudie night immediately. Spred thy close Curtaine Loue‑performing night, That run‑awayes eyes may wincke, and Romeo Leape to these armes, vntalkt of and vnseene,
[1595]
Louers can see to doe their Amorous rights, And by their owne Beauties: or if Loue be blind, It best agrees with night: come ciuill night, Thou sober suted Matron all in blacke, And learne me how to loose a winning match,
[1600]
Plaid for a paire of stainlesse Maidenhoods, Hood my vnman'd blood bayting in my Cheekes, With thy Blacke mantle, till strange Loue grow bold, Thinke true Loue acted simple modestie: Come night, come Romeo, come thou day in night,
[1605]
For thou wilt lie vpon the wings of night Whiter then new Snow vpon a Rauens backe: Come gentle night, come louing blackebrow'd night. Giue me my Romeo, and when I shall die, Take him and cut him out in little starres,
[1610]
And he will make the Face of heauen so fine, That all the world will be in Loue with night, And pay no worship to the Garish Sun. O I haue bought the Mansion of a Loue, But not possest it, and though I am sold,
[1615]
Not yet enioy'd, so tedious is this day, As is the night before some Festiuall, To an impatient child that hath new robes And may not weare them, O here comes my Nurse: Enter Nurse with cords. And she brings newes and euery tongue that speaks
[1620]
But Romeos, name, speakes heauenly eloquence : Now Nurse, what newes? what hast thou there? The Cords that Romeo bid thee fetch?
Nur. I, I, the Cords. Iuli. Ay me, what newes?
[1625]
Whst thou wring thy hands.
Nur. A welady, hee's dead, hee's dead, We are vndone Lady, we are vndone. Alacke the day, hee's gone, hee's kil'd, he's dead. Iul. Can heauen be so enuious? Nur.
[1630]
Romeo can, Though heauen cannot. O Romeo, Romeo, Who euer would haue thought it Romeo.
Iuli. What diuell art thou, That dost torment me thus?
[1635]
This torture should be roar'd in dismall hell, Hath Romeo slaine himselfe? say thou but I, And that bare vowell I shall poyson more Then the death‑darting eye of Cockatrice, I am not I, if there be such an I.
[1640]
Or those eyes shot, that makes thee answere I: If he be slaine say I, or if not, no. Briefe, sounds, determine of my weale or wo.
Nur. I saw the wound, I saw it with mine eyes, God saue the marke, here on his manly brest,
[1645]
A pitteous Coarse, a bloody piteous Coarse: Pale, pale as ashes, all bedawb'd in blood, All in gore blood, I sounded at the sight‑
Iul. O breake my heart, Poore Banckrout breake at once,
[1650]
To prison eyes, nere looke on libertie. Vile earth to earth resigne, end motion here, And thou and Romeo presse on heauie beere.
Nur. O Tybalt, Tybalt, the best Friend I had: O curteous Tybalt honest Gentleman,
[1655]
That euer I should liue to see thee dead.
Iul. What storme is this that blowes so contrarie? Is Romeo slaughtred? and is Tybalt dead? My dearest Cozen, and my dearer Lord: Then dreadfull Trumpet sound the generall doome,
[1660]
For who is liuing, if those two are gone?
Nur. Tybalt is gone, and Romeo banished, Romeo that kil'd him, he is banished. Iul. O God! Did Rom'os hand shed Tybalts blood
[1665]
It did, it did, alas the day, it did.
Nur. O Serpent heart, hid with a flowring face. Iul. Did euer Dragon keepe so faire a Caue? Beautifull Tyrant, fiend Angelicall: Rauenous Doue‑feather'd Rauen,
[1670]
Woluish‑rauening Lambe, Dispised substance of Diuinest show: Iust opposite to what thou iustly seem'st, A dimne Saint, an Honourable Villaine: O Nature! what had'st thou to doe in hell,
[1675]
When thou did'st bower the spirit of a fiend In mortall paradise of such sweet flesh? Was euer booke containing such vile matter So fairely bound? O that deceit should dwell In such a gorgeous Pallace.
Nur.
[1680]
There's no trust, no faith, no honestie in men, All periur'd, all forsworne, all naught, all dissemblers, Ah where's my man? giue me some Aqua‑vitæ? These griefes, these woes, these sorrowes make me old: Shame come to Romeo.
Iul.
[1685]
Blister'd be thy tongue For such a wish, he was not borne to shame: Vpon his brow shame is asham'd to sit; For 'tis a throane where Honour may be Crown'd Sole Monarch of the vniuersall earth:
[1690]
O what a beast was I to chide him?
Nur. Will you speake well of him, That kil'd your Cozen? Iul. Shall I speake ill of him that is my husband? Ah poore my Lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,
[1695]
When I thy three houres wife haue mangled it. But wherefore Villaine did'st thou kill my Cozin? That Villaine Cozin would haue kil'd my husband: Backe foolish teares, backe to your natiue spring, Your tributarie drops belong to woe,
[1700]
Which you mistaking offer vp to ioy: My husband liues that Tibalt would haue slaine, And Tibalt dead that would haue slaine my husband: All this is comfort, wherefore weepe I then? Some words there was worser then Tybalts death
[1705]
That murdered me, I would forget it feine, But oh, it presses to my memory, Like damned guilty deedes to sinners minds, Tybalt is dead and Romeo banished: That banished, that one word banished,
[1710]
Hath slaine ten thousand Tibalts: Tibalts death Was woe inough if it had ended there: Or if sower woe delights in fellowship, And needly will be rankt with other griefes, Why followed not when she said Tibalts dead,
[1715]
Thy Father or thy Mother, nay or both, Which moderne lamentation might haue mou'd. But which a rere‑ward following Tybalts death Romeo is banished to speake that word, Is Father, Mother, Tybalt, Romeo, Iuliet,
[1720]
All slaine, all dead: Romeo is banished, There is no end, no limit, measure, bound, In that words death, no words can that woe sound. Where is my Father and my Mother Nurse?
Nur. Weeping and wailing ouer Tybalts Coarse,
[1725]
Will you go to them? I will bring you thither.
Iu. Wash they his wounds with tears: mine shal be spent When theirs are drie for Romeo's banishment. Take vp those Cordes, poore ropes you are beguil'd, Both you and I for Romeo is exild:
[1730]
He made you for a high‑way to my bed, But I a Maid, die Maiden widowed. Come Cord, come Nurse, Ile to my wedding bed, And death not Romeo, take my Maiden head.
Nur. Hie to your Chamber, Ile find Romeo
[1735]
To comfort you, I wot well where he is: Harke ye your Romeo will be heere at night, Ile to him, he is hid at Lawrence Cell.
Iul. O find him, giue this Ring to my true Knight, And bid him come, to take his last farewell. Exit.
 

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<div type="scene" n="2" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 2]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Iuliet alone.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1588">Gallop apace, you fiery footed<choice>
            <orig>fteedes</orig>
            <corr>steedes</corr>
         </choice>,</l>
      <l n="1589">Towards<hi rend="italic">Phæbus</hi>lodging, such a Wagoner</l>
      <l n="1590">As<hi rend="italic">Phaeton</hi>would whip you to the west,</l>
      <l n="1591">And bring in Cloudie night immediately.</l>
      <l n="1592">Spred thy close Curtaine Loue‑performing night,</l>
      <l n="1593">That run‑awayes eyes may wincke, and<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="1594">Leape to these armes, vntalkt of and vnseene,</l>
      <l n="1595">Louers can see to doe their Amorous rights,</l>
      <l n="1596">And by their owne Beauties: or if Loue be blind,</l>
      <l n="1597">It best agrees with night: come ciuill night,</l>
      <l n="1598">Thou sober suted Matron all in blacke,</l>
      <l n="1599">And learne me how to loose a winning match,</l>
      <l n="1600">Plaid for a paire of stainlesse Maidenhoods,</l>
      <l n="1601">Hood my vnman'd blood bayting in my Cheekes,</l>
      <l n="1602">With thy Blacke mantle, till strange Loue grow bold,</l>
      <l n="1603">Thinke true Loue acted simple modestie:</l>
      <l n="1604">Come night, come<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>, come thou day in night,</l>
      <l n="1605">For thou wilt lie vpon the wings of night</l>
      <l n="1606">Whiter then new Snow vpon a Rauens backe:</l>
      <l n="1607">Come gentle night, come louing blackebrow'd night.</l>
      <l n="1608">Giue me my<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>, and when I shall die,</l>
      <l n="1609">Take him and cut him out in little starres,</l>
      <l n="1610">And he will make the Face of heauen so fine,</l>
      <l n="1611">That all the world will be in Loue with night,</l>
      <l n="1612">And pay no worship to the Garish Sun.</l>
      <l n="1613">O I haue bought the Mansion of a Loue,</l>
      <l n="1614">But not possest it, and though I am sold,</l>
      <l n="1615">Not yet enioy'd, so tedious is this day,</l>
      <l n="1616">As is the night before some Festiuall,</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0684-0.jpg" n="66"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="1617">To an impatient child that hath new robes</l>
      <l n="1618">And may not weare them, O here comes my Nurse:</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Nurse with cords.</stage>
      <l n="1619">And she brings newes and euery tongue that speaks</l>
      <l n="1620">But<hi rend="italic">Romeos</hi>, name, speakes heauenly eloquence<gap extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              reason="nonstandardCharacter"
              agent="inkedSpacemarker"
              resp="#ES"/>:</l>
      <l n="1621">Now Nurse, what newes? what hast thou there?</l>
      <l n="1622">The Cords that<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>bid thee fetch?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1623">I, I, the Cords.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iuli.</speaker>
      <l n="1624">Ay me, what newes?</l>
      <l n="1625">Whst thou wring thy hands.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1626">A welady, hee's dead, hee's dead,</l>
      <l n="1627">We are vndone Lady, we are vndone.</l>
      <l n="1628">Alacke the day, hee's gone, hee's kil'd, he's dead.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1629">Can heauen be so enuious?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1630">
         <hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>can,</l>
      <l n="1631">Though heauen cannot. O<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>,<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1632">Who euer would haue thought it<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iuli.</speaker>
      <l n="1633">What diuell art thou,</l>
      <l n="1634">That dost torment me thus?</l>
      <l n="1635">This torture should be roar'd in dismall hell,</l>
      <l n="1636">Hath<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>slaine himselfe? say thou but I,</l>
      <l n="1637">And that bare vowell I shall poyson more</l>
      <l n="1638">Then the death‑darting eye of Cockatrice,</l>
      <l n="1639">I am not I, if there be such an I.</l>
      <l n="1640">Or those eyes shot, that makes thee answere I:</l>
      <l n="1641">If he be slaine say I, or if not, no.</l>
      <l n="1642">Briefe, sounds, determine of my weale or wo.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1643">I saw the wound, I saw it with mine eyes,</l>
      <l n="1644">God saue the marke, here on his manly brest,</l>
      <l n="1645">A pitteous Coarse, a bloody piteous Coarse:</l>
      <l n="1646">Pale, pale as ashes, all bedawb'd in blood,</l>
      <l n="1647">All in gore blood, I sounded at the sight‑</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1648">O breake my heart,</l>
      <l n="1649">Poore Banckrout breake at once,</l>
      <l n="1650">To prison eyes, nere looke on libertie.</l>
      <l n="1651">Vile earth to earth resigne, end motion here,</l>
      <l n="1652">And thou and<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>presse on heauie beere.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1653">O<hi rend="italic">Tybalt</hi>,<hi rend="italic">Tybalt</hi>, the best Friend I had:</l>
      <l n="1654">O curteous<hi rend="italic">Tybalt</hi>honest Gentleman,</l>
      <l n="1655">That euer I should liue to see thee dead.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1656">What storme is this that blowes so contrarie?</l>
      <l n="1657">Is<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>slaughtred? and is<hi rend="italic">Tybalt</hi>dead?</l>
      <l n="1658">My dearest Cozen, and my dearer Lord:</l>
      <l n="1659">Then dreadfull Trumpet sound the generall doome,</l>
      <l n="1660">For who is liuing, if those two are gone?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1661">
         <hi rend="italic">Tybalt</hi>is gone, and<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>banished,</l>
      <l n="1662">
         <hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>that kil'd him, he is banished.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1663">O God!</l>
      <l n="1664">Did<hi rend="italic">Rom'os</hi>hand shed<hi rend="italic">Tybalts</hi>blood</l>
      <l n="1665">It did, it did, alas the day, it did.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1666">O Serpent heart, hid with a flowring face.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1667">Did euer Dragon keepe so faire a Caue?</l>
      <l n="1668">Beautifull Tyrant, fiend Angelicall:</l>
      <l n="1669">Rauenous Doue‑feather'd Rauen,</l>
      <l n="1670">Woluish‑rauening Lambe,</l>
      <l n="1671">Dispised substance of Diuinest show:</l>
      <l n="1672">Iust opposite to what thou iustly seem'st,</l>
      <l n="1673">A dimne Saint, an Honourable Villaine:</l>
      <l n="1674">O Nature! what had'st thou to doe in hell,</l>
      <l n="1675">When thou did'st bower the spirit of a fiend</l>
      <l n="1676">In mortall paradise of such sweet flesh?</l>
      <l n="1677">Was euer booke containing such vile matter</l>
      <l n="1678">So fairely bound? O that deceit should dwell</l>
      <l n="1679">In such a gorgeous Pallace.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1680">There's no trust, no faith, no honestie in men,</l>
      <l n="1681">All periur'd, all forsworne, all naught, all dissemblers,</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="1682">Ah where's my man? giue me some Aqua‑vitæ?</l>
      <l n="1683">These griefes, these woes, these sorrowes make me old:</l>
      <l n="1684">Shame come to<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1685">Blister'd be thy tongue</l>
      <l n="1686">For such a wish, he was not borne to shame:</l>
      <l n="1687">Vpon his brow shame is asham'd to sit;</l>
      <l n="1688">For 'tis a throane where Honour may be Crown'd</l>
      <l n="1689">Sole Monarch of the vniuersall earth:</l>
      <l n="1690">O what a beast was I to chide him?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1691">Will you speake well of him,</l>
      <l n="1692">That kil'd your Cozen?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1693">Shall I speake ill of him that is my husband?</l>
      <l n="1694">Ah poore my Lord, what tongue shall smooth thy name,</l>
      <l n="1695">When I thy three houres wife haue mangled it.</l>
      <l n="1696">But wherefore Villaine did'st thou kill my Cozin?</l>
      <l n="1697">That Villaine Cozin would haue kil'd my husband:</l>
      <l n="1698">Backe foolish teares, backe to your natiue spring,</l>
      <l n="1699">Your tributarie drops belong to woe,</l>
      <l n="1700">Which you mistaking offer vp to ioy:</l>
      <l n="1701">My husband liues that<hi rend="italic">Tibalt</hi>would haue slaine,</l>
      <l n="1702">And<hi rend="italic">Tibalt</hi>dead that would haue slaine my husband:</l>
      <l n="1703">All this is comfort, wherefore weepe I then?</l>
      <l n="1704">Some words there was worser then<hi rend="italic">Tybalts</hi>death</l>
      <l n="1705">That murdered me, I would forget it feine,</l>
      <l n="1706">But oh, it presses to my memory,</l>
      <l n="1707">Like damned guilty deedes to sinners minds,</l>
      <l n="1708">
         <hi rend="italic">Tybalt</hi>is dead and<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>banished:</l>
      <l n="1709">That banished, that one word banished,</l>
      <l n="1710">Hath slaine ten thousand<hi rend="italic">Tibalts</hi>:<hi rend="italic">Tibalts</hi>death</l>
      <l n="1711">Was woe inough if it had ended there:</l>
      <l n="1712">Or if sower woe delights in fellowship,</l>
      <l n="1713">And needly will be rankt with other griefes,</l>
      <l n="1714">Why followed not when she said<hi rend="italic">Tibalts</hi>dead,</l>
      <l n="1715">Thy Father or thy Mother, nay or both,</l>
      <l n="1716">Which moderne lamentation might haue mou'd.</l>
      <l n="1717">But which a rere‑ward following<hi rend="italic">Tybalts</hi>death</l>
      <l n="1718">
         <hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>is banished to speake that word,</l>
      <l n="1719">Is Father, Mother,<hi rend="italic">Tybalt</hi>,<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>,<hi rend="italic">Iuliet</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1720">All slaine, all dead:<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>is banished,</l>
      <l n="1721">There is no end, no limit, measure, bound,</l>
      <l n="1722">In that words death, no words can that woe sound.</l>
      <l n="1723">Where is my Father and my Mother Nurse?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1724">Weeping and wailing ouer<hi rend="italic">Tybalts</hi>Coarse,</l>
      <l n="1725">Will you go to them? I will bring you thither.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iu.</speaker>
      <l n="1726">Wash they his wounds with tears: mine shal be spent</l>
      <l n="1727">When theirs are drie for<hi rend="italic">Romeo's</hi>banishment.</l>
      <l n="1728">Take vp those Cordes, poore ropes you are beguil'd,</l>
      <l n="1729">Both you and I for<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>is exild:</l>
      <l n="1730">He made you for a<gap extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              reason="nonstandardCharacter"
              agent="inkedSpacemarker"
              resp="#ES"/>high‑way to my bed,</l>
      <l n="1731">But I a Maid, die Maiden widowed.</l>
      <l n="1732">Come Cord, come Nurse, Ile to my wedding bed,</l>
      <l n="1733">And death not<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>, take my Maiden head.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-nur">
      <speaker rend="italic">Nur.</speaker>
      <l n="1734">Hie to your Chamber, Ile find<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="1735">To comfort you, I wot well where he is:</l>
      <l n="1736">Harke ye your<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>will be heere at night,</l>
      <l n="1737">Ile to him, he is hid at<hi rend="italic">Lawrence</hi>Cell.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="1738">O find him, giue this Ring to my true Knight,</l>
      <l n="1739">And bid him come, to take his last farewell.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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