The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: ff5v - Tragedies, p. 70

Left Column


The Tragedie of Romeo and Iuliet.
[2125]
To go with Paris to Saint Peters Church: Or I will drag thee on a Hurdle thither. Out you greene sicknesse carrion, out you baggage, You tallow face.
Lady. Fie, fie, what are you mad? Iul.
[2130]
Good Father, I beseech you on my knees Heare me with patience, but to speake a word.
Fa. Hang thee young baggage, disobedient wretch, I tell thee what, get thee to Church a Thursday, Or neuer after looke me in the face.
[2135]
Speake not, reply not, do not answere me. My fingers itch, wife: we scarce thought vs blest, That God had lent vs but this onely Child, But now I see this one is one too much, And that we haue a curse in hauing her:
[2140]
Out on her Hilding.
Nur. God in heauen blesse her, You are too blame my Lord to rate her so. Fa. And why my Lady wisedome? hold your tongue, Good Prudence, smatter with your gossip, go. Nur.
[2145]
I speak no treason, Father, O Godigoden, May not one speake?
Fa. Peace you mumbling foole, Vtter your grauitie ore a Gossips bowles
[2150]
For here we need it not.
La. You are too hot. Fa. Gods bread, it makes me mad: Day, night, houre, ride, time, worke, play, Alone in companie, still my care hath bin
[2155]
To haue her matcht, and hauing now prouided A Gentleman of Noble Parentage, Of faire Demeanes, Youthfull, and Nobly Allied, Stuft as they say with Honourable parts, Proportion'd as ones thought would wish a man,
[2160]
And then to haue a wretched puling foole, A whining mammet, in her Fortunes tender, To answer, Ile not wed, I cannot Loue: I am too young, I pray you pardon me. But, and you will not wed, Ile pardon you.
[2165]
Graze where you will, you shall not house with me: Looke too't, thinke on't, I do not vse to iest. Here the page begins to be torn, increasingly obscuring the first letters of each line. Thursday is neere, lay hand on heart, aduise, And you be mine, Ile giue you to my Friend: And you be not, hang, beg, straue, die in the streets,
[2170]
For by my soule, Ile nere acknowledge thee, Nor what is mine shall neuer do thee good: T ust too't, bethinke you, Ile not be forsworne
Exit. Iuli. Is there no pittie sitting in the Cloudes, That sees into the bottome of my griefe?
[2175]
sweet my Mother cast me not away, lay this marriage, for a month, a weeke, if you do not, make the Bridall bed that dim Monument where Tybalt lies.
Mo. Talke not to me, for Ile not speake a word,
[2180]
o as thou wilt, for I haue done with thee.
Exit. Iul. O God! O Nurse, how shall this be preuented? My Husband is on earth, my faith in heauen, How shall that faith returne againe to earth,
[2185]
Vnlesse that Husband send it me from heauen, By leauing earth? Comfort me, counsaile me: Hlacke, alacke, that heauen should practise stratagems Vpon so soft a subiect as my selfe. What faist thou? hast thou not a word of ioy?
[2190]
Some comfort Nurse.

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Right Column


Nur. Faith here it is, Romeo is banished, and all the world to nothing, That he dares nere come backe to challenge you: Or if he do, it need must be by stealth.
[2195]
Then since the case so stands as now it doth, I thinke it best you married with the Countie, O hee's a Louely Gentleman: Romeos a dish‑clout to him: an Eagle Madam Hath not so greene, so quicke, so faire an eye
[2200]
As Paris hath, beshrow my very heart, I thinke you are happy in this second match, For it excels your first: or if it did not, Your first is dead, or 'twere as good he were, As liuing here and you no vse of him.
Iul.
[2205]
Speakest thou from thy heart ?
Nur. And from my soule too, Or else beshrew them both. Iul. Amen. Nur. What? Iul.
[2210]
Well, thou hast comforted me marue'lous much, Go in, and tell my Lady I am gone, Hauing displeas'd my Father, to Lawrence Cell, To make confession, and to be absolu'd.
Nur. Marrie I will, and this is wisely done. Iul.
[2215]
Auncient damnation, O most wicked fiend! It is more sin to wish me thus forsworne, Or to dispraise my Lord with that same tongue Which she hath prais'd him with aboue compare, So many thousand times? Go Counsellor,
[2220]
Thou and my bosome henchforth shall be twaine: Ile to the Frier to know his remedie, If all else faile, my selfe haue power to die.
Exeunt.
[Act 4, Scene 1] Enter Frier and Countie Paris. Fri. On Thursday sir? the time is very short. Par. My Father Capulet will haue it so,
[2225]
And I am nothing slow to slack his hast.
Fri. You say you do not know the Ladies mind? Vneuen is the course, I like it not. Pa. Immoderately she weepes for Tybalts death, And therfore haue I little talke of Loue,
[2230]
For Venus smiles not in a house of teares. Now sir, her Father counts it dangerous That she doth giue her sorrow so much sway: And in his wisedome, hasts our marriage, To stop the inundation of her teares,
[2235]
Which too much minded by her selfe alone, May be put from her by societie. Now doe you know the reason of this hast?
Fri. I would I knew not why it should be slow'd. Looke sir, here comes the Lady towards my Cell. Enter Iuliet. Par.
[2240]
Happily met, my Lady and my wife.
Iul. That may be sir, when I may be a wife. Par. That may be, must be Loue, on Thursday next. Iul. What must be shall be. Fri. That's a certaine text. Par.
[2245]
Come you to make confession to this Father?
Iul. To answere that, I should confesse to you. Par. Do not denie to him, that you Loue me. Iul. I will confesse to you that I Loue him. Par. So will ye, I am sure that you Loue me. Iul.
[2250]
If I do so, it will be of more price, Being spoke behind your backe, then to your face.
Par. Poore soule, thy face is much abus'd with teares. Iuli. The

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[Act 4, Scene 1] Enter Frier and Countie Paris. Fri. On Thursday sir? the time is very short. Par. My Father Capulet will haue it so,
[2225]
And I am nothing slow to slack his hast.
Fri. You say you do not know the Ladies mind? Vneuen is the course, I like it not. Pa. Immoderately she weepes for Tybalts death, And therfore haue I little talke of Loue,
[2230]
For Venus smiles not in a house of teares. Now sir, her Father counts it dangerous That she doth giue her sorrow so much sway: And in his wisedome, hasts our marriage, To stop the inundation of her teares,
[2235]
Which too much minded by her selfe alone, May be put from her by societie. Now doe you know the reason of this hast?
Fri. I would I knew not why it should be slow'd. Looke sir, here comes the Lady towards my Cell. Enter Iuliet. Par.
[2240]
Happily met, my Lady and my wife.
Iul. That may be sir, when I may be a wife. Par. That may be, must be Loue, on Thursday next. Iul. What must be shall be. Fri. That's a certaine text. Par.
[2245]
Come you to make confession to this Father?
Iul. To answere that, I should confesse to you. Par. Do not denie to him, that you Loue me. Iul. I will confesse to you that I Loue him. Par. So will ye, I am sure that you Loue me. Iul.
[2250]
If I do so, it will be of more price, Being spoke behind your backe, then to your face.
Par. Poore soule, thy face is much abus'd with teares. Iul. The teares haue got small victorie by that: For it was bad inough before their spight. Pa.
[2255]
Thou wrong'st it more then teares with that report.
Iul. That is no slaunder sir, which is a truth, And what I spake, I spake it to thy face. Par. Thy face is mine, and thou hast slaundred it. Iul. It may be so, for it is not mine owne.
[2260]
Are you at leisure, Holy Father now, Or shall I come to you at euening Masse?
Fri. My leisure serues me pensiue daughter now. My Lord you must intreat the time alone. Par. Godsheild: I should disturbe Deuotion,
[2265]
Iuliet, on Thursday early will I rowse yee, Till then adue, and keepe this holy kisse.
Exit Paris. Iul. O shut the doore, and when thou hast done so, Come weepe with me, past hope, past care, past helpe. Fri. O Iuliet, I alreadie know thy griefe,
[2270]
It streames me past the compasse of my wits: I heare thou must and nothing may prorogue it, On Thursday next be married to this Countie.
Iul. Tell me not Frier that thou hearest of this, Vnlesse thou tell me how I may preuent it:
[2275]
If in thy wisedome, thou canst giue no helpe, Do thou but call my resolution wise, And with' his knife, Ile helpe it presently. God ioyn'd my heart, and Romeos, thou our hands, And ere this hand by thee to Romeo seal'd:
[2280]
Shall be the Labell to another Deede, Or my true heart with trecherous reuolt, Turne to another, this shall slay them both: Therefore out of thy long expetien'st experien'st time, Giue me some present counsell, or behold
[2285]
Twixt my extreames and me, this bloody knife Shall play the vmpeere, arbitrating that, Which the commission of thy yeares and art, Could to no issue of true honour bring: Be not so long to speak, I long to die,
[2290]
If what thou speakst, speake not of remedy.
Fri. Hold Daughter, I doe spie a kind of hope, Which craues as desperate an execution, As that is desperate which we would preuent. If rather then to marrie Countie Paris
[2295]
Thou hast the strength of will to stay thy selfe, Then is it likely thou wilt vndertake A thing like death to chide away this shame, That coap'st with death himselfe, to scape fro it: And if thou dar'st, Ile giue thee remedie.
Iul.
[2300]
Oh bid me leape, rather then marrie Paris, From of the Battlements of any Tower, Or walke in theeuish waies, or bid me lurke Where Serpents are: chaine me with roaring Beares Or hide me nightly in a Charnell house,
[2305]
Orecouered quite with dead mens ratling bones, With reckie shankes and yellow chappels sculls: Or bid me go into a new made graue, And hide me with a dead man in his graue, Things that to heare them told, haue made me tremble,
[2310]
And I will doe it without feare or doubt, To liue an vnstained wife to my sweet Loue.
Fri. Hold then: goe home, be merrie, giue consent, To marrie Paris: wensday is to morrow, To morrow night looke that thou lie alone,
[2315]
Let not thy Nurse lie with thee in thy Chamber: Take thou this Violl being then in bed, And this distilling liquor drinke thou off, When presently through all thy veines shall run, A cold and drowsie humour: for no pulse
[2320]
Shall keepe his natiue progresse, but surcease: No warmth, no breath shall testifie thou liuest, The Roses in thy lips and cheekes shall fade To many ashes, the eyes windowes fall Like death when he shut vp the day of life:
[2325]
Each part depriu'd of supple gouernment, Shall stiffe and starke, and cold appeare like death, And in this borrowed likenesse of shrunke death Thou shalt continue two and forty houres, And then awake, as from a pleasant sleepe.
[2330]
Now when the Bridegroome in the morning comes, To rowse thee from thy bed, there art thou dead: Then as the manner of our country is, In thy best Robes vncouer'd on the Beere, Be borne to buriall in thy kindreds graue:
[2335]
Thou shalt be borne to that same ancient vault, Where all the kindred of the Capulets lie, In the meane time against thou shalt awake, Shall Romeo by my Letters know our drift, And hither shall he come, and that very night
[2340]
Shall Romeo beare thee hence to Mantua. And this shall free thee from this present shame, If no inconstant toy nor womanish feare, Abate thy valour in the acting it.
Iul. Giue me, giue me, O tell me not of care. Fri.
[2345]
Hold get you gone, be strong and prosperous: In this resolue, Ile send a Frier with speed To Mantua with my Letters to thy Lord.
Iu. Loue giue me strength, And strength shall helpe afford:
[2350]
Farewell deare father.
Exit
 

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<div type="scene" n="1" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 4, Scene 1]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Frier and Countie Paris.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2223">On Thursday sir? the time is very short.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2224">My Father<hi rend="italic">Capulet</hi>will haue it so,</l>
      <l n="2225">And I am nothing slow to slack his hast.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2226">You say you do not know the Ladies mind?</l>
      <l n="2227">Vneuen is the course, I like it not.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pa.</speaker>
      <l n="2228">Immoderately she weepes for<hi rend="italic">Tybalts</hi>death,</l>
      <l n="2229">And therfore haue I little talke of Loue,</l>
      <l n="2230">For<hi rend="italic">Venus</hi>smiles not in a house of teares.</l>
      <l n="2231">Now sir, her Father counts it dangerous</l>
      <l n="2232">That she doth giue her sorrow so much sway:</l>
      <l n="2233">And in his wisedome, hasts our marriage,</l>
      <l n="2234">To stop the inundation of her teares,</l>
      <l n="2235">Which too much minded by her selfe alone,</l>
      <l n="2236">May be put from her by societie.</l>
      <l n="2237">Now doe you know the reason of this hast?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2238">I would I knew not why it should be slow'd.</l>
      <l n="2239">Looke sir, here comes the Lady towards my Cell.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Iuliet.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2240">Happily met, my Lady and my wife.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2241">That may be sir, when I may be a wife.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2242">That may be, must be Loue, on Thursday next.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2243">What must be shall be.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2244">That's a certaine text.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2245">Come you to make confession to this Father?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2246">To answere that, I should confesse to you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2247">Do not denie to him, that you Loue me.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2248">I will confesse to you that I Loue him.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2249">So will ye, I am sure that you Loue me.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2250">If I do so, it will be of more price,</l>
      <l n="2251">Being spoke behind your backe, then to your face.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2252">Poore soule, thy face is much abus'd with teares.</l>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0689-0.jpg" n="71"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2253">The teares haue got small victorie by that:</l>
      <l n="2254">For it was bad inough before their spight.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pa.</speaker>
      <l n="2255">Thou wrong'st it more then teares with that report.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2256">That is no slaunder sir, which is a truth,</l>
      <l n="2257">And what I spake, I spake it to thy face.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2258">Thy face is mine, and thou hast slaundred it.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2259">It may be so, for it is not mine owne.</l>
      <l n="2260">Are you at leisure, Holy Father now,</l>
      <l n="2261">Or shall I come to you at euening Masse?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2262">My leisure serues me pensiue daughter now.</l>
      <l n="2263">My Lord you must intreat the time alone.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2264">Godsheild: I should disturbe Deuotion,</l>
      <l n="2265">
         <hi rend="italic">Iuliet</hi>, on Thursday early will I rowse yee,</l>
      <l n="2266">Till then adue, and keepe this holy kisse.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit Paris.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2267">O shut the doore, and when thou hast done so,</l>
      <l n="2268">Come weepe with me, past hope, past care, past helpe.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2269">O<hi rend="italic">Iuliet</hi>, I alreadie know thy griefe,</l>
      <l n="2270">It streames me past the compasse of my wits:</l>
      <l n="2271">I heare thou must and nothing may prorogue it,</l>
      <l n="2272">On Thursday next be married to this Countie.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2273">Tell me not Frier that thou hearest of this,</l>
      <l n="2274">Vnlesse thou tell me how I may preuent it:</l>
      <l n="2275">If in thy wisedome, thou canst giue no helpe,</l>
      <l n="2276">Do thou but call my resolution wise,</l>
      <l n="2277">And with' his knife, Ile helpe it presently.</l>
      <l n="2278">God ioyn'd my heart, and<hi rend="italic">Romeos</hi>, thou our hands,</l>
      <l n="2279">And ere this hand by thee to<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>seal'd:</l>
      <l n="2280">Shall be the Labell to another Deede,</l>
      <l n="2281">Or my true heart with trecherous reuolt,</l>
      <l n="2282">Turne to another, this shall slay them both:</l>
      <l n="2283">Therefore out of thy long<choice>
            <orig>expetien'st</orig>
            <corr>experien'st</corr>
         </choice>time,</l>
      <l n="2284">Giue me some present counsell, or behold</l>
      <l n="2285">Twixt my extreames and me, this bloody knife</l>
      <l n="2286">Shall play the vmpeere, arbitrating that,</l>
      <l n="2287">Which the commission of thy yeares and art,</l>
      <l n="2288">Could to no issue of true honour bring:</l>
      <l n="2289">Be not so long to speak, I long to die,</l>
      <l n="2290">If what thou speakst, speake not of remedy.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2291">Hold Daughter, I doe spie a kind of hope,</l>
      <l n="2292">Which craues as desperate an execution,</l>
      <l n="2293">As that is desperate which we would preuent.</l>
      <l n="2294">If rather then to marrie Countie<hi rend="italic">Paris</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="2295">Thou hast the strength of will to stay thy selfe,</l>
      <l n="2296">Then is it likely thou wilt vndertake</l>
      <l n="2297">A thing like death to chide away this shame,</l>
      <l n="2298">That coap'st with death himselfe, to scape fro it:</l>
      <l n="2299">And if thou dar'st, Ile giue thee remedie.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2300">Oh bid me leape, rather then marrie<hi rend="italic">Paris</hi>,</l>
      <l n="2301">From of the Battlements of any Tower,</l>
      <l n="2302">Or walke in theeuish waies, or bid me lurke</l>
      <l n="2303">Where Serpents are: chaine me with roaring Beares</l>
      <l n="2304">Or hide me nightly in a Charnell house,</l>
      <l n="2305">Orecouered quite with dead mens ratling bones,</l>
      <l n="2306">With reckie shankes and yellow chappels sculls:</l>
      <l n="2307">Or bid me go into a new made graue,</l>
      <l n="2308">And hide me with a dead man in his graue,</l>
      <l n="2309">Things that to heare them told, haue made me tremble,</l>
      <l n="2310">And I will doe it without feare or doubt,</l>
      <l n="2311">To liue an vnstained wife to my sweet Loue.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2312">Hold then: goe home, be merrie, giue consent,</l>
      <l n="2313">To marrie<hi rend="italic">Paris</hi>: wensday is to morrow,</l>
      <l n="2314">To morrow night looke that thou lie alone,</l>
      <l n="2315">Let not thy Nurse lie with thee in thy Chamber:</l>
      <l n="2316">Take thou this Violl being then in bed,</l>
      <l n="2317">And this distilling liquor drinke thou off,</l>
      <l n="2318">When presently through all thy veines shall run,</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="2319">A cold and drowsie humour: for no pulse</l>
      <l n="2320">Shall keepe his natiue progresse, but surcease:</l>
      <l n="2321">No warmth, no breath shall testifie thou liuest,</l>
      <l n="2322">The Roses in thy lips and cheekes shall fade</l>
      <l n="2323">To many ashes, the eyes windowes fall</l>
      <l n="2324">Like death when he shut vp the day of life:</l>
      <l n="2325">Each part depriu'd of supple gouernment,</l>
      <l n="2326">Shall stiffe and starke, and cold appeare like death,</l>
      <l n="2327">And in this borrowed likenesse of shrunke death</l>
      <l n="2328">Thou shalt continue two and forty houres,</l>
      <l n="2329">And then awake, as from a pleasant sleepe.</l>
      <l n="2330">Now when the Bridegroome in the morning comes,</l>
      <l n="2331">To rowse thee from thy bed, there art thou dead:</l>
      <l n="2332">Then as the manner of our country is,</l>
      <l n="2333">In thy best Robes vncouer'd on the Beere,</l>
      <l n="2334">Be borne to buriall in thy kindreds graue:</l>
      <l n="2335">Thou shalt be borne to that same ancient vault,</l>
      <l n="2336">Where all the kindred of the<hi rend="italic">Capulets</hi>lie,</l>
      <l n="2337">In the meane time against thou shalt awake,</l>
      <l n="2338">Shall<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>by my Letters know our drift,</l>
      <l n="2339">And hither shall he come, and that very night</l>
      <l n="2340">Shall<hi rend="italic">Romeo</hi>beare thee hence to<hi rend="italic">Mantua</hi>.</l>
      <l n="2341">And this shall free thee from this present shame,</l>
      <l n="2342">If no inconstant toy nor womanish feare,</l>
      <l n="2343">Abate thy valour in the acting it.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="2344">Giue me, giue me, O tell me not of care.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-fla">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fri.</speaker>
      <l n="2345">Hold get you gone, be strong and prosperous:</l>
      <l n="2346">In this resolue, Ile send a Frier with speed</l>
      <l n="2347">To<hi rend="italic">Mantua</hi>with my Letters to thy Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-rom-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iu.</speaker>
      <l n="2348">Loue giue me strength,</l>
      <l n="2349">And strength shall helpe afford:</l>
      <l n="2350">Farewell deare father.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit</stage>
</div>

        
        

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