The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: ²A5v - Comedies, p. 10

Left Column


The Tempest.
[1095]
But hee is dround; and these are diuels; O de­ fend me.
Ste.

Foure legges and two voyces; a most delicate

Monster: his forward voyce now is to speake well of

his friend; his backward voice, is to vtter foule speeches,

and to detract: if all the wine in my bottle will recouer

[1100]

him, I will helpe his Ague: Come: Amen, I will

poure some in thy other mouth.

Tri.

Stephano.

Ste.

Doth thy other mouth call me? Mercy, mercy:

This is a diuell, and no Monster: I will leaue him, I

[1105]

haue no long Spoone.

Tri.

Stephano: if thou beest Stephano, touch me, and

speake to me: for I am Trinculo; be not afeard, thy

good friend Trinculo.

Ste.

If thou bee'st Trinculo: come forth: I'le pull

[1110]

thee by the lesser legges: if any be o' Trinculo's legges,

these are they: Thou art very Trinculo indeede: how

cam'st thou to be the siege of this Moone‑calfe? Can

he vent Trinculo's?

Tri.

I tooke him to be kil'd with a thunder‑strok; but

[1115]

art thou not dround Stephano: I hope now thou art

not dround: Is the Storme ouer‑blowne? I hid mee

vnder the dead Moone‑Calfes Gaberdine, for feare of

the Storme: And art thou liuing Stephano? O Stephano,

two Neapolitanes scap'd?

Ste.
[1120]

'Prethee doe not turne me about, my stomacke

is not constant.

Cal.

These be fine things, and if they be not sprights:

that's a braue God, and beares Celestiall liquor: I will

kneele to him.

Ste.
[1125]

How did'st thou scape?

How cam'st thou hither?

Sweare by this Bottle how thou cam' st hither: I escap'd

vpon a But of Sacke, which the Saylors heaued o're‑

boord, by this Bottle which I made of the barke of

[1130]

a Tree, with mine owne hands, since I was cast a'shore.

Cal.

I'le sweare vpon that Bottle, to be thy true sub­

iect, for the liquor is not earthly.

St. Heere: sweare then how thou escap'dst Tri.

Swom ashore (man) like a Ducke: I can swim

[1135]

like a Ducke I'le be sworne.

Ste.

Here, kisse the Booke.

Though thou canst swim like a Ducke, thou art made

like a Goose.

Tri.

O Stephano, ha'st any more of this?

Ste.
[1140]

The whole But (man) my Cellar is in a rocke

by th' sea‑side, where my Wine is hid:

How now Moone‑Calfe, how do's thine Ague?

Cal.

Ha'st thou not dropt from heauen?

Ste.

Out o'th Moone I doe assure thee. I was

[1145]

the Man ith' Moone, when time was.

Cal.

I haue seene thee in her: and I doe adore thee:

My Mistris shew'd me thee, and thy Dog, and thy Bush.

Ste.

Come, sweare to that: kisse the Booke: I will

furnish it anon with new Contents: Sweare.

Tri.
[1150]
By this good light, this is a very shallow Mon­ ster: I afeard of him? a very weake Monster: The Man ith' Moone? A most poore creadulous Monster: Well drawne Monster, in good sooth.
Cal.

Ile shew thee euery fertill ynch 'oth Island: and

[1155]

I will kisse thy foote: I prethee be my god.

Tri.

By this light, a most perfidious, and drunken

Monster, when's god's a sleepe he'll rob his Bottle.

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Right Column


Cal. Ile kisse thy foot, Ile sweare my selfe thy Subiect Ste. Come on then: downe and sweare. Tri.
[1160]

I shall laugh my selfe to death at this puppi‑hea­

ded Monster: a most scuruie Monster: I could finde in

my heart to beate him.

Ste. Come, kisse. Tri. But that the poore Monster's in drinke:
[1165]
An abhominable Monster.
Cal. I'le shew thee the best Springs: I'le plucke thee Berries: I'le fish for thee; and get thee wood enough. A plague vpon the Tyrant that I serue; I'le beare him no more Stickes, but follow thee, thou wondrous man. Tri.
[1170]

A most rediculous Monster, to make a wonder of

a poore drunkard.

Cal.

I'prethee let me bring thee where Crabs grow;

and I with my long nayles will digge thee pig‑nuts;

show thee a Iayes nest, and instruct thee how to snare

[1175]

the nimble Marmazet: I'le bring thee to clustring

Philbirts, and sometimes I'le get thee young Scamels

from the Rocke: Wilt thou goe with me?

Ste.

I pre'thee now lead the way without any more

talking. Trinculo, the King, and all our company else

[1180]

being dround, wee will inherit here: Here; beare my

Bottle: Fellow Trinculo; we'll fill him by and by a­

gaine.

Caliban Sings drunkenly. Farewell Master; farewell, farewell. Tri. A howling Monster: a drunken Monster. Cal.
[1185]
No more dams I'le make for fish, Nor fetch in firing, at requiring, Nor scrape trenchering, nor wash dish, Ban' ban' Cacalyban Has a new Master, get a new Man.
[1190]
Freedome, high‑day, high‑day freedome, freedome high‑ day, freedome.
Ste. O braue Monster; lead the way. Exeunt.
Actus Tertius. Scœna Prima. [Act 3, Scene 1] Enter Ferdinand (bearing a Log.) Fer. There be some Sports are painfull; & their labor Delight in them set off: Some kindes of basenesse Are nobly vndergon; and most poore matters
[1195]
Point to rich ends: this my meane Taske Would be as heauy to me, as odious, but The Mistris which I serue, quickens what's dead, And makes my labours, pleasures: O She is Ten times more gentle, then her Father's crabbed;
[1200]
And he's compos'd of harshnesse. I must remoue Some thousands of these Logs, and pile them vp, Vpon a sore iniunction; my sweet Mistris Weepes when she sees me worke, & saies, such baseness Had neuer like Executor: I forget:
[1205]
But these sweet thoughts, doe euen refresh my labours, Most busie lest, when I doe it.
Enter Miranda and Prospero. Mir. Alas, now pray you Worke not so hard: I would the lightning had Burnt vp those Logs that you are enioynd to pile:
[1210]
Pray set it downe, and rest you: when this burnes 'Twill weepe for hauing wearied you: my Father Is hard at study; pray now rest your selfe, He's

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Actus Tertius. Scœna Prima. [Act 3, Scene 1] Enter Ferdinand (bearing a Log.) Fer. There be some Sports are painfull; & their labor Delight in them set off: Some kindes of basenesse Are nobly vndergon; and most poore matters
[1195]
Point to rich ends: this my meane Taske Would be as heauy to me, as odious, but The Mistris which I serue, quickens what's dead, And makes my labours, pleasures: O She is Ten times more gentle, then her Father's crabbed;
[1200]
And he's compos'd of harshnesse. I must remoue Some thousands of these Logs, and pile them vp, Vpon a sore iniunction; my sweet Mistris Weepes when she sees me worke, & saies, such baseness Had neuer like Executor: I forget:
[1205]
But these sweet thoughts, doe euen refresh my labours, Most busie lest, when I doe it.
Enter Miranda and Prospero. Mir. Alas, now pray you Worke not so hard: I would the lightning had Burnt vp those Logs that you are enioynd to pile:
[1210]
Pray set it downe, and rest you: when this burnes 'Twill weepe for hauing wearied you: my Father Is hard at study; pray now rest your selfe, He's safe for these three houres.
Fer. O most deere Mistris
[1215]
The Sun will set before I shall discharge What I must striue to do.
Mir. If you'l sit downe Ile beare your Logges the while: pray giue me that, Ile carry it to the pile. Fer.
[1220]
No precious Creature, I had rather cracke my sinewes, breake my backe, Then you should such dishonor vndergoe, While I sit lazy by.
Mir. It would become me
[1225]
As well as it do's you; and I should do it With much more ease: for my good will is to it, And yours it is against.
Pro. Poore worme thou art infected, This visitation shewes it. Mir.
[1230]
You looke wearily.
Fer. No, noble Mistris, 'tis fresh morning with me When you are by at night: I do beseech you Cheefely, that I might set it in my prayers, What is your name? Mir.
[1235]
Miranda, O my Father, I haue broke your hest to say so.
Fer. Admir'd Miranda, Indeede the top of Admiration, worth What's deerest to the world: full many a Lady
[1240]
I haue ey'd with best regard, and many a time Th'harmony of their tongues, hath into bondage Brought my too diligent eare: for seuerall vertues Haue I lik'd seuerall women, neuer any With so full soule, but some defect in her
[1245]
Did quarrell with the noblest grace she ow'd, And put it to the foile. But you, O you, So perfect, and so peerlesse, are created Of euerie Creatures best.
Mir. I do not know
[1250]
One of my sexe; no womans face remembe , Saue from my glasse, mine owne: Nor haue I seene More that I may call men, then you good friend, And my deere Father: how features are abroad I am skillesse of; but by my modestie
[1255]
(The iewell in my dower) I would not wish Any Companion in the world but you: Nor can imagination forme a shape Besides your selfe, to like of: but I prattle Something too wildely, and my Fathers precepts
[1260]
I therein do forget.
Fer. I am, in my condition A Prince ( Miranda) I do thinke a King (I would not so) and would no more endure This wodden slauerie, then to suffer
[1265]
The flesh‑flie blow my mouth: heare my soule speake. The verie instant that I saw you, did My heart flie to your seruice, there resides To make me slaue to it, and for your sake Am I this patient Logge‑man.
Mir.
[1270]
Do you loue me?
Fer. O heauen; O earth, beare witnes to this sound, And crowne what I professe with kinde euent If I speake true: if hollowly, inuert What best is boaded me, to mischiefe: I,
[1275]
Beyond all limit of what else i'th world Do loue, prize, honor you.
Mir. I am a foole To weepe at what I am glad of. Pro. Faire encounter
[1280]
Of two most rare affections: heauens raine grace On that which breeds betweene 'em.
Fer. VVherefore weepe you? Mir. At mine vnworthinesse, that dare not offer VVhat I desire to giue; and much lesse take
[1285]
VVhat I shall die to want: But this is trifling, And all the more it seekes to hide it selfe, The bigger bulke it shewes. Hence bashfull cunning, And prompt me plaine and holy innocence. I am your wife, if you will marrie me;
[1290]
If not, Ile die your maid: to be your fellow You may denie me, but Ile be your seruant VVhether you will or no.
Fer. My Mistris (deerest) And I thus humble euer. Mir.
[1295]
My husband then?
Fer. I, with a heart as willing As bondage ere of freedome: heere's my hand. Mir. And mine, with my heart in't; and now farewel Till halfe an houre hence. Fer.
[1300]
A thousand, thousand.
Exeunt. Pro. So glad of this as they I cannot be, VVho are surpriz'd with all; but my reioycing At nothing can be more: Ile to my booke, For yet ere supper time, must I performe
[1305]
Much businesse appertaining.
Exit.
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="1">
   <head rend="italic center">Actus Tertius. Scœna Prima.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 1]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="mixed">Enter Ferdinand (bearing a Log.)</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1192">There be some Sports are painfull; &amp; their labor</l>
      <l n="1193">Delight in them set off: Some kindes of basenesse</l>
      <l n="1194">Are nobly vndergon; and most poore matters</l>
      <l n="1195">Point to rich ends: this my meane Taske</l>
      <l n="1196">Would be as heauy to me, as odious, but</l>
      <l n="1197">The Mistris which I serue, quickens what's dead,</l>
      <l n="1198">And makes my labours, pleasures: O She is</l>
      <l n="1199">Ten times more gentle, then her Father's crabbed;</l>
      <l n="1200">And he's compos'd of harshnesse. I must remoue</l>
      <l n="1201">Some thousands of these Logs, and pile them vp,</l>
      <l n="1202">Vpon a sore iniunction; my sweet Mistris</l>
      <l n="1203">Weepes when she sees me worke, &amp; saies, such baseness</l>
      <l n="1204">Had neuer like Executor: I forget:</l>
      <l n="1205">But these sweet thoughts, doe euen refresh my labours,</l>
      <l n="1206">Most busie lest, when I doe it.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic inline" type="entrance">Enter Miranda
      <lb rend="turnunder"/>and Prospero.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1207">Alas, now pray you</l>
      <l n="1208">Worke not so hard: I would the lightning had</l>
      <l n="1209">Burnt vp those Logs that you are enioynd to pile:</l>
      <l n="1210">Pray set it downe, and rest you: when this burnes</l>
      <l n="1211">'Twill weepe for hauing wearied you: my Father</l>
      <l n="1212">Is hard at study; pray now rest your selfe,</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0031-0.jpg" n="11"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="1213">He's safe for these three houres.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1214">O most deere Mistris</l>
      <l n="1215">The Sun will set before I shall discharge</l>
      <l n="1216">What I must striue to do.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1217">If you'l sit downe</l>
      <l n="1218">Ile beare your Logges the while: pray giue me that,</l>
      <l n="1219">Ile carry it to the pile.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1220">No precious Creature,</l>
      <l n="1221">I had rather cracke my sinewes, breake my backe,</l>
      <l n="1222">Then you should such dishonor vndergoe,</l>
      <l n="1223">While I sit lazy by.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1224">It would become me</l>
      <l n="1225">As well as it do's you; and I should do it</l>
      <l n="1226">With much more ease: for my good will is to it,</l>
      <l n="1227">And yours it is against.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-pro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pro.</speaker>
      <l n="1228">Poore worme thou art infected,</l>
      <l n="1229">This visitation shewes it.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1230">You looke wearily.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1231">No, noble Mistris, 'tis fresh morning with me</l>
      <l n="1232">When you are by at night: I do beseech you</l>
      <l n="1233">Cheefely, that I might set it in my prayers,</l>
      <l n="1234">What is your name?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1235">
         <hi rend="italic">Miranda</hi>, O my Father,</l>
      <l n="1236">I haue broke your hest to say so.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1237">Admir'd<hi rend="italic">Miranda</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1238">Indeede the top of Admiration, worth</l>
      <l n="1239">What's deerest to the world: full many a Lady</l>
      <l n="1240">I haue ey'd with best regard, and many a time</l>
      <l n="1241">Th'harmony of their tongues, hath into bondage</l>
      <l n="1242">Brought my too diligent eare: for seuerall vertues</l>
      <l n="1243">Haue I lik'd seuerall women, neuer any</l>
      <l n="1244">With so full soule, but some defect in her</l>
      <l n="1245">Did quarrell with the noblest grace she ow'd,</l>
      <l n="1246">And put it to the foile. But you, O you,</l>
      <l n="1247">So perfect, and so peerlesse, are created</l>
      <l n="1248">Of euerie Creatures best.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1249">I do not know</l>
      <l n="1250">One of my sexe; no womans face remembe<gap extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              reason="illegible"
              agent="inkBlot"
              resp="#LMC"/>,</l>
      <l n="1251">Saue from my glasse, mine owne: Nor haue I seene</l>
      <l n="1252">More that I may call men, then you good friend,</l>
      <l n="1253">And my deere Father: how features are abroad</l>
      <l n="1254">I am skillesse of; but by my modestie</l>
      <l n="1255">(The iewell in my dower) I would not wish</l>
      <l n="1256">Any Companion in the world but you:</l>
      <l n="1257">Nor can imagination forme a shape</l>
      <l n="1258">Besides your selfe, to like of: but I prattle</l>
      <l n="1259">Something too wildely, and my Fathers precepts</l>
      <l n="1260">I therein do forget.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1261">I am, in my condition</l>
      <l n="1262">A Prince (<hi rend="italic">Miranda</hi>) I do thinke a King</l>
      <l n="1263">(I would not so) and would no more endure</l>
      <l n="1264">This wodden slauerie, then to suffer</l>
      <l n="1265">The flesh‑flie blow my mouth: heare my soule speake.</l>
      <l n="1266">The verie instant that I saw you, did</l>
      <l n="1267">My heart flie to your seruice, there resides</l>
      <l n="1268">To make me slaue to it, and for your sake</l>
      <l n="1269">Am I this patient Logge‑man.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1270">Do you loue me?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1271">O heauen; O earth, beare witnes to this sound,</l>
      <l n="1272">And crowne what I professe with kinde euent</l>
      <l n="1273">If I speake true: if hollowly, inuert</l>
      <l n="1274">What best is boaded me, to mischiefe: I,</l>
      <l n="1275">Beyond all limit of what else i'th world</l>
      <l n="1276">Do loue, prize, honor you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1277">I am a foole</l>
      <l n="1278">To weepe at what I am glad of.</l>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-tem-pro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pro.</speaker>
      <l n="1279">Faire encounter</l>
      <l n="1280">Of two most rare affections: heauens raine grace</l>
      <l n="1281">On that which breeds betweene 'em.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1282">VVherefore weepe you?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1283">At mine vnworthinesse, that dare not offer</l>
      <l n="1284">VVhat I desire to giue; and much lesse take</l>
      <l n="1285">VVhat I shall die to want: But this is trifling,</l>
      <l n="1286">And all the more it seekes to hide it selfe,</l>
      <l n="1287">The bigger bulke it shewes. Hence bashfull cunning,</l>
      <l n="1288">And prompt me plaine and holy innocence.</l>
      <l n="1289">I am your wife, if you will marrie me;</l>
      <l n="1290">If not, Ile die your maid: to be your fellow</l>
      <l n="1291">You may denie me, but Ile be your seruant</l>
      <l n="1292">VVhether you will or no.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1293">My Mistris (deerest)</l>
      <l n="1294">And I thus humble euer.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1295">My husband then?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1296">I, with a heart as willing</l>
      <l n="1297">As bondage ere of freedome: heere's my hand.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-mir">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mir.</speaker>
      <l n="1298">And mine, with my heart in't; and now farewel</l>
      <l n="1299">Till halfe an houre hence.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tem-fer">
      <speaker rend="italic">Fer.</speaker>
      <l n="1300">A thousand, thousand.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic inline" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tem-pro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pro.</speaker>
      <l n="1301">So glad of this as they I cannot be,</l>
      <l n="1302">VVho are surpriz'd with all; but my reioycing</l>
      <l n="1303">At nothing can be more: Ile to my booke,</l>
      <l n="1304">For yet ere supper time, must I performe</l>
      <l n="1305">Much businesse appertaining.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic inline" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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