The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: B6v - Comedies, p. 24

Left Column


The two Gentlemen of Uerona. bolder to chide you, for yours.

Val.

In conclusion, I stand affected to her.

Speed.

I would you were set, so your affection would

cease.

Val. Last night she enioyn'd me,
[470]
To write some lines to one she loues.
Speed.

And haue you?

Ual.

I haue.

Speed.

Are they not lamely writt?

Val. No (Boy) but as well as I can do them:
[475]
Peace, here she comes.
Speed. Oh excellent motion; Oh exceeding Puppet: Now will he interpret to her. Val.

Madam & Mistres, a thousand good‑morrows.

Speed.

Oh, 'giue ye‑good‑ev'n: heer's a million of

[480]

manners.

Sil.

Sir Valentine, and seruant, to you two thousand.

Speed.

He should giue her interest: & she giues it him.

Val. As you inioynd me; I haue writ your Letter Vnto the secret, nameles friend of yours:
[485]
Which I was much vnwilling to proceed in, But for my duty to your Ladiship.
Sil.

I thanke you (gentle Seruant) 'tis very Clerkly‑

(done.

Val. Now trust me (Madam) it came hardly‑off:
[490]
For being ignorant to whom it goes, I writ at randome, very doubtfully.
Sil.

Perchance you think too much of so much pains?

Val.

No (Madam) so it steed you, I will write

(Please you command) a thousand times as much:

[495]
And yet⸺
Sil. A pretty period: well: I ghesse the sequell; And yet I will not name it: and yet I care not. And yet, take this againe: and yet I thanke you: Meaning henceforth to trouble you no more. Speed.
[500]

And yet you will: and yet, another yet.

Val. What meanes your Ladiship? Doe you not like it? Sil. Yes, yes; the lines are very queintly writ, But (since vnwillingly) take them againe.
[505]
Nay, take them.
Val.

Madam, they are for you.

Sil. I, I: you writ them Sir, at my request, But I will none of them: they are for you: I would haue had them writ more mouingly: Val.
[510]

Please you, Ile write your Ladiship another.

Sil. And when it's writ: for my sake read it ouer, And if it please you, so: if not: why, so: Val.

If it please me, (Madam?) what then?

Sil. Why if it please you, take it for your labour;
[515]
And so good‑morrow Seruant.
Exit. Sil. Speed. Oh Iest vnseene: inscrutible: inuisible, As a nose on a mans face, or a Weathercocke on a steeple: My master sues to her: and she hath taught her Sutor, He being her Pupill, to become her Tutor.
[520]
Oh excellent deuise, was there euer heard a better? That my master being scribe, To himselfe should write the Letter?
Val. How now Sir? What are you reasoning with your selfe? Speed.
[525]

Nay: I was riming: 'tis you y t that haue the reason.

Val.

To doe what?

Speed.

To be a spokes‑man from Madam Siluia.

Val.

To whom?

Speed.

To your selfe: why, she woes you by a figure.

Val.
[530]

What figure?

Speed.

By a Letter, I should say.

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Right Column


Val.

Why she hath not writ to me?

Speed. What need she, When shee hath made you write to your selfe?
[535]
Why, doe you not perceiue the iest?
Val.

No, beleeue me.

Speed. No beleeuing you indeed sir: But did you perceiue her earnest? Ual.

She gaue me none, except an angry word.

Speed.
[540]

Why she hath giuen you a Letter.

Val.

That's the Letter I writ to her friend.

Speed.

And y t letter hath she deliuer'd, & there an end.

Val.

I would it were no worse.

Speed. Ile warrant you, 'tis as well:
[545]
For often haue you writ to her: and she in modesty, Or else for want of idle time, could not againe reply, Or fearing else some messēger messenger , y t might her mind discouer Her self hath taught her Loue himself, to write vnto her (louer. All this I speak in print, for in print I found it.
[550]
Why muse you sir? 'tis dinner time.
Ual.

I haue dyn'd.

Speed.

I, but hearken sir: though the Cameleon Loue

can feed on the ayre, I am one that am nourish'd by my

victuals; and would faine haue meate: oh bee not like

[555]

your Mistresse, be moued, be moued.

Exeunt.
Scœna Secunda. [Act 2, Scene 2] Enter Protheus, Iulia, Panthion. Pro.

Haue patience, gentle Iulia:

Iul.

I must where is no remedy.

Pro.

When possibly I can, I will returne.

Iul. If you turne not: you will return the sooner:
[560]
Keepe this remembrance for thy Iulia's sake.
Pro. Why then wee'll make exchange; Here, take you this. Iul.

And seale the bargaine with a holy kisse.

Pro. Here is my hand, for my true constancie:
[565]
And when that howre oer­slips me in the day, Wherein I sigh not ( Iulia) for thy sake, The next ensuing howre, some foule mischance Torment me for my Loues forgetfulnesse: My father staies my coming; answere not:
[570]
The tide is now; nay, not thy tide of teares, That tide will stay me longer then I should, Iulia, farewell: what, gon without a word? I, so true loue should doe: it cannot speake, For truth hath better deeds, then words to grace it.
Panth.
[575]

Sir Protheus: you are staid for.

Pro. Goe: I come, I come:

Alas, this parting strikes poore Louers dumbe.

Exeunt.
Scœna Tertia. [Act 2, Scene 3] Enter Launce, Panthion. Launce.

Nay, 'twill bee this howre ere I haue done

weeping: all the kinde of the Launces, haue this very

[580]

fault: I haue receiu'd my proportion, like the prodigious sonne,

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Scœna Secunda. [Act 2, Scene 2] Enter Protheus, Iulia, Panthion. Pro.

Haue patience, gentle Iulia:

Iul.

I must where is no remedy.

Pro.

When possibly I can, I will returne.

Iul. If you turne not: you will return the sooner:
[560]
Keepe this remembrance for thy Iulia's sake.
Pro. Why then wee'll make exchange; Here, take you this. Iul.

And seale the bargaine with a holy kisse.

Pro. Here is my hand, for my true constancie:
[565]
And when that howre oer­slips me in the day, Wherein I sigh not ( Iulia) for thy sake, The next ensuing howre, some foule mischance Torment me for my Loues forgetfulnesse: My father staies my coming; answere not:
[570]
The tide is now; nay, not thy tide of teares, That tide will stay me longer then I should, Iulia, farewell: what, gon without a word? I, so true loue should doe: it cannot speake, For truth hath better deeds, then words to grace it.
Panth.
[575]

Sir Protheus: you are staid for.

Pro. Goe: I come, I come:

Alas, this parting strikes poore Louers dumbe.

Exeunt.
 

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<div type="scene" n="2">
   <head rend="italic center">Scœna Secunda.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 2, Scene 2]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Protheus, Iulia, Panthion.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tgv-pro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pro.</speaker>
      <p n="556">Haue patience, gentle<hi rend="italic">Iulia</hi>:</p>
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   <sp who="#F-tgv-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <p n="557">I must where is no remedy.</p>
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   <sp who="#F-tgv-pro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pro.</speaker>
      <p n="558">When possibly I can, I will returne.</p>
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      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <l n="559">If you turne not: you will return the sooner:</l>
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   <sp who="#F-tgv-pro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pro.</speaker>
      <l n="561">Why then wee'll make exchange;</l>
      <l n="562">Here, take you this.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tgv-jul">
      <speaker rend="italic">Iul.</speaker>
      <p n="563">And seale the bargaine with a holy kisse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tgv-pro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pro.</speaker>
      <l n="564">Here is my hand, for my true constancie:</l>
      <l n="565">And when that howre oer­slips me in the day,</l>
      <l n="566">Wherein I sigh not (<hi rend="italic">Iulia</hi>) for thy sake,</l>
      <l n="567">The next ensuing howre, some foule mischance</l>
      <l n="568">Torment me for my Loues forgetfulnesse:</l>
      <l n="569">My father staies my coming; answere not:</l>
      <l n="570">The tide is now; nay, not thy tide of teares,</l>
      <l n="571">That tide will stay me longer then I should,</l>
      <l n="572">
         <hi rend="italic">Iulia</hi>, farewell: what, gon without a word?</l>
      <l n="573">I, so true loue should doe: it cannot speake,</l>
      <l n="574">For truth hath better deeds, then words to grace it.</l>
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   <sp who="#F-tgv-pan">
      <speaker rend="italic">Panth.</speaker>
      <p n="575">Sir<hi rend="italic">Protheus</hi>: you are staid for.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tgv-pro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pro.</speaker>
      <l n="576">Goe: I come, I come:</l>
      <p n="577">Alas, this parting strikes poore Louers dumbe.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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