The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: C5r - Comedies, p. 33

Left Column


The two Gentlemen of Uerona. 1. Out.

But if thou scorne our curtesie, thou dyest.

2. Out.
[1580]

Thou shalt not liue, to brag what we haue of­

(fer'd.

Val. I take your offer, and will liue with you, Prouided that you do no outrages On silly women, or poore passengers. 3. Out.
[1585]
No, we detest such vile base practises. Come, goe with vs; we'll bring thee to our Crewes, And show thee all the Treasure we haue got; Which, with our selues, all rest at thy dispose.
Exeunt.
Scœna Secunda. [Act 4, Scene 2] Enter Protheus, Thurio, Iulia, Host, Musitian, Siluia. Pro. Already haue I bin false to Valentine,
[1590]
And now I must be as vnjust to Thurio, Vnder the colour of commending him, I haue accesse my owne loue to prefer. But Siluia is too faire, too true, too holy, To be corrupted with my worthlesse guifts;
[1595]
When I protest true loyalty to her, She twits me with my falsehood to my friend; When to her beauty I commend my vowes, She bids me thinke how I haue bin forsworne In breaking faith with Iulia, whom I lou'd;
[1600]
And notwithstanding all her sodaine quips, The least whereof would quell a louers hope: Yet (Spaniel‑like) the more she spurnes my loue, The more it growes and fawneth on her still; But here comes Thurio; now must we to her window,
[1605]
And giue some euening Musique to her eare.
Th.

How now, sir Protheus, are you crept before vs?

Pro. I gentle Thurio, for you know that loue Will creep in service, where it cannot goe. Th.

I, but I hope, Sir, that you loue not here.

Pro.
[1610]

Sir, but I doe: or else I would be hence.

Th.

Who, Siluia?

Pro.

I, Siluia, for your sake.

Th. I thanke you for your owne: Now Gentlemen Let's tune: and too it lustily awhile. Ho.
[1615]
Now, my yong guest; me thinks your' allycholly; I pray you why is it?
Iu.

Marry (mine Host) because I cannot be merry.

Ho.

Come, we'll haue you merry: ile bring you where you

shall heare Musique, and see the Gentleman that

[1620]

you ask'd for.

Iu.

But shall I heare him speake.

Ho.

I that you shall.

Iu.

That will be Musique.

Ho.

Harke, harke.

Iu.
[1625]

Is he among these?

Ho. I: but peace, let's heare'm. Song. Who is Siluia? What is she? That all our Swaines commend her? Holy, faire, and wise is she,
[1630]
The heauen such grace did lend her, that she might admired be. Is she kinde as she is faire? For beauty liues with kindnesse. Loue doth to her eyes repaire,
[1635]
To helpe him of his blindnesse:

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[full image]

Right Column


And being help'd, inhabits there. Then to Siluia, let vs sing, That Siluia is excelling; She excels each mortall thing
[1640]
Vpon the dull earth dwelling. To her let vs Garlands bring.
Ho. How now? are you sadder than you were before; How doe you, man? the Musicke likes you not. Iu.

You mistake: the Musitian likes me not.

Ho.
[1645]

Why, my pretty youth?

Iu.

He plaies false (father.)

Ho.

How, out of tune on the strings.

Iu. Not so: but yet So false that he grieues my very heart‑strings. Ho.
[1650]

You have a quicke eare.

Iu.

I, I would I were deafe: it makes me haue a slow

(heart.

Ho.

I perceiue you delight not in Musique.

Iu.

Not a whit, when it iars so.

Ho.
[1655]

Harke, what fine change is in the Musique.

Iu.

I: that change is the spight.

Ho.

You would haue them alwaies play but one thing.

Iu. I would alwaies haue one play but one thing. But Host, doth this Sir Protheus, that we talk on,
[1660]
Often resort vnto this Gentlewoman?
Ho. I tell you what Launce his man told me, He lou'd her out of all nicke. Iu.

Where is Launce?

Ho.

Gone to seeke his dog, which to morrow, by his

[1665]

Masters command, hee must carry for a present to his

Lady.

Iu.

Peace, stand aside, the company parts.

Pro. Sir Thurio, feare not you, I will so pleade, That you shall say, my cunning drift excels. Th.
[1670]

Where meete we?

Pro.

At Saint Gregories well.

Th.

Farewell.

Pro.

Madam: good eu'n to your Ladyship.

Sil. I thanke you for your Musique (Gentlemen)
[1675]
Who is that that spake?
Pro. One (Lady) if you knew his pure hearts truth, You would quickly learne to know him by his voice. Sil.

Sir Protheus, as I take it.

Pro.

Sir Protheus (gentle Lady) and your Seruant.

Sil.
[1680]

What's your will?

Pro.

That I may compasse yours.

Sil. You haue your wish: my will is euen this, That presently you hie you home to bed: Thou subtile, periur'd, false, disloyall man:
[1685]
Think'st thou I am so shallow, so conceitlesse, To be seduced by thy flattery, That has't deceiu'd so many with thy vowes? Returne, returne, and make thy loue amends: For me (by this pale queene of night I sweare)
[1690]
I am so farre from granting thy request, That I despise thee, for thy wrongfull suite; And by and by intend to chide my selfe, Euen for this time I spend in talking to thee.
Pro. I grant (sweet loue), that I did loue a Lady,
[1695]
But she is dead.
Iu. 'Twere false, if I should speake it; For I am sure she is not buried. Sil. Say that she be: yet Valentine thy friend Suruiues; to whom (thy selfe art witnesse)
[1700]
I am betroth'd; and art thou not asham'd To wrong him, with thy importunacy?
Pro.

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