The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: Gg5v - Tragedies, p. 86

Left Column


Timon of Athens.

what necessity belong'd too't, and yet was deny'de.

Luci.

How?

2

I tell you, deny'de my Lord.

Luci.

What a strange case was that? Now before the

[950]

Gods I am asham'd on't. Denied that honourable man?

There was verie little Honour shew'd in't. For my owne

part, I must needes confesse, I haue receyued some small

kindnesses from him, as Money, Plate, Iewels, and such

like Trifles; nothing comparing to his: yet had hee mi­

[955]

stooke him, and sent to me, I should ne're haue denied his

Occasion so many Talents.

Enter Seruilius. Seruil.

See, by good hap yonders my Lord, I haue

swet to see his Honor. My Honor'd Lord.

Lucil.

Seruilius? You are kindely met sir. Farthewell,

[960]

commend me to thy Honourable vertuous Lord, my ve­

ry exquisite Friend.

Seruil.

May it please your Honour, my Lord hath

sent⸺

Luci.

Ha ? what ha's he sent? I am so much endeered

[965]

to that Lord; hee's euer sending: how shall I thank him

think'st thou ? And what has he sent now?

Seruil.

Has onely sent his present Occasion now my

Lord: requesting your Lordship to supply his instant vse

with so many Talents.

Lucil.
[970]
I know his Lordship is but merry with me, He cannot want fifty fiue hundred Talents.
Seruil. But in the mean time he wants lesse my Lord. If his occasion were not vertuous, I should not vrge it halfe so faithfully. Luc.
[975]
Dost thou speake seriously Seruilius?
Seruil. Vpon my soule 'tis true Sir. Luci.

What a wicked Beast was I to disfurnish my

self against such a good time, when I might ha shewn my

selfe Honourable? How vnluckily it hapned, that I shold

[980]

Purchase the day before for a little part, and vndo a great

deale of Honour? Seruilius, now before the Gods I am

not able to do (the more beast I say) I was sending to vse

Lord Timon my selfe, these Gentlemen can witnesse; but

I would not for the wealth of Athens I had done't now.

[985]

Commend me bountifully to his good Lordship, and I

hope his Honor will conceiue the fairest of mee, because

I haue no power to be kinde. And tell him this from me,

I count it one of my greatest afflictions say, that I cannot

pleasure such an Honourable Gentleman. Good Seruili­ us , will you befriend mee so farre, as to vse mine owne

words to him?

Ser. Yes sir, I shall. Exit Seruil. Lucil. Ile looke you out a good turne Seruilius. True as you said, Timon is shrunke indeede,
[995]
And he that's once deny'de, will hardly speede.
Exit. 1 Do you obserue this Hostilius? 2 I, to well. 1 Why this is the worlds soule, And iust of the same peece
[1000]
Is euery Flatterers sport: who can call him his Friend That dips in the same dish? For in my knowing Timon has bin this Lords Father, And kept his credit with his purse: Supported his estate, nay Timons money
[1005]
Has paid his men their wages. He ne're drinkes, But Timons Siluer treads vpon his Lip, And yet, oh see the monstrousnesse of man, When he lookes out in an vngratefull shape; He does deny him (in respect of his)

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Right Column


[1010]
What charitable men affoord to Beggers.
3 Religion grones at it. 1 For mine owne part, I neuer tasted Timon in my life Nor came any of his bounties ouer me, To marke me for his Friend. Yet I protest,
[1015]
For his right Noble minde, illustrious Vertue, And Honourable Carriage, Had his necessity made vse of me, I would haue put my wealth into Donation, And the best halfe should haue return'd to him,
[1020]
So much I loue his heart: But I perceiue, Men must learne now with pitty to dispence, For Policy sits aboue Conscience.
Exeunt.
[Act 3, Scene 3] Enter a third seruant with Sempronius, another of Timons Friends. Semp. Must he needs trouble me in't? Hum. 'Boue all others?
[1025]
He might haue tried Lord Lucius, or Lucullus, And now Ventidgius is wealthy too, Whom he redeem'd from prison. All these Owes their estates vnto him.
Ser. My Lord,
[1030]
They haue all bin touch'd, and found Base‑Mettle, For they haue all denied him.
Semp. How? Haue they deny'de him? Has Ventidgius and Lucullus deny'de him, And does he send to me? Three? Humh?
[1035]
It shewes but little loue, or iudgement in him. Must I be his last Refuge? His Friends (like Physitians) Thriue, giue him ouer: Must I take th'Cure vpon me? Has much disgrace'd me in't, I'me angry at him, That might haue knowne my place. I see no sense for't,
[1040]
But his Occasions might haue wooed me first: For in my conscience, I was the first man That ere receiued guift from him. And does he thinke so backwardly of me now, That Ile requite it last? No:
[1045]
So it may proue an Argument of Laughter To th'rest, and 'mong'st Lords be thought a Foole: I'de rather then the worth of thrice the summe, Had sent to me first, but for my mindes sake: I'de such a courage to do him good. But now returne,
[1050]
And with their faint reply, this answer ioyne; Who bates mine Honor, shall not know my Coyne.
Exit Ser.

Excellent: Your Lordships a goodly Villain: the

diuell knew not what he did, when hee made man Poli­

ticke; he crossed himselfe by't: and I cannot thinke, but

[1055]

in the end, the Villanies of man will set him cleere. How

fairely this Lord striues to appeare foule? Takes Vertu­

ous Copies to be wicked: like those, that vnder hotte ar­

dent zeale, would set whole Realmes on fire, of such a na­

ture is his politike loue.

[1060]
This was my Lords best hope, now all are fled Saue onely the Gods. Now his Friends are dead, Doores that were ne're acquainted with their Wards Many a bounteous yeere, must be imploy'd Now to guard sure their Master:
[1065]
And this is all a liberall course allowes, Who cannot keepe his wealth, must keep his house.
Exit.
[Act 3, Scene 4] Enter Varro's man, meeting others. All Timons Creditors to wait for his comming out. Then enter Lucius and Hortensius. Var. man. Well met, goodmorrow Titus & Hortensius Titus

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[Act 3, Scene 4] Enter Varro's man, meeting others. All Timons Creditors to wait for his comming out. Then enter Lucius and Hortensius. Var. man. Well met, goodmorrow Titus & Hortensius Tit. The like to you kinde Varro. Hort. Lucius, what do we meet together? Luci.
[1070]
I, and I think one businesse do's command vs all. For mine is money.
Tit. So is theirs, and ours. Enter Philotus. Luci. And sir Philotus too. Phil. Good day at once. Luci.
[1075]
Welcome good Brother. What do you thinke the houre?
Phil. Labouring for Nine. Luci. So much? Phil. Is not my Lord seene yet? Luci.
[1080]
Not yet.
Phil. I wonder on't, he was wont to shine at seauen. Luci. I, but the dayes are waxt shorter with him: You must consider, that a Prodigall course Is like the Sunnes, but not like his recouerable, I feare:
[1085]

'Tis deepest Winter in Lord Timons purse, that is: One

may reach deepe enough, and yet finde little.

Phil. I am of your feare, for that. Tit. Ile shew you how t'obserue a strange euent: Your Lord sends now for Money? Hort.
[1090]
Most true, he doe's.
Tit. And he weares Iewels now of Timons guift, For which I waite for money. Hort. It is against my heart. Luci. Marke how strange it showes,
[1095]
Timon in this, should pay more then he owes: And e'ne as if your Lord should weare rich Iewels, And send for money for 'em.
Hort. I'me weary of this Charge, The Gods can witnesse:
[1100]
I know my Lord hath spent of Timons wealth, And now Ingratitude, makes it worse then stealth.
Varro. Yes, mine's three thousand Crownes: What's yours ? Luci. Fiue thousand mine. Varro.
[1105]
'Tis much deepe, and it should seem by th'sum Your Masters confidence was aboue mine, Else surely his had equall'd.
Enter Flaminius. Tit. One of Lord Timons men. Luc.

Flaminius? Sir, a word: Pray is my Lord readie

[1110]

to come forth?

Flam. No, indeed he is not. Tit. We attend his Lordship: pray signifie so much. Flam.

I need not tell him that, he knowes you are too

(diligent.

Enter Steward in a Cloake, muffled. Luci.
[1115]
Ha: is not that his Steward muffled so? He goes away in a Clowd: Call him, call him.
Tit. Do you heare, sir? 2. Varro. By your leaue, sir. Stew. What do ye aske of me, my Friend. Tit.
[1120]
We waite for certaine Money heere, sir.
Stew. I, if Money were as certaine as your waiting, 'Twere sure enough. Why then preferr'd you not your summes and Billes When your false Masters eate of my Lords meat?
[1125]
Then they could smile, and fawne vpon his debts. And take downe th'Intrest into their glutt'nous Mawes. You do your selues but wrong, to stirre me vp, Let me passe quietly: Beleeue't, my Lord and I haue made an end,
[1130]
I haue no more to reckon, he to spend.
Luci. I, but this answer will not serue. Stew. If't 'twill not serue, 'tis not so base as you, For you serue Knaues. 1. Varro.

How? What does his casheer'd Worship

[1135]

mutter ?

2. Varro.

No matter what, hee's poore, and that's re­

uenge enough. Who can speake broader, then hee that

has no house to put his head in ? Such may rayle against

great buildings.

Enter Seruilius. Tit.
[1140]

Oh here's Seruilius: now wee shall know some

answere.

Seru.

If I might beseech you Gentlemen, to repayre

some other houre, I should deriue much from't. For tak't

of my soule, my Lord leanes wondrously to discontent:

[1145]

His comfortable temper has forsooke him, he's much out

of health, and keepes his Chamber.

Luci. Many do keepe their Chambers, are not sicke: And if it be so farre beyond his health, Me thinkes he should the sooner pay his debts,
[1150]
And make a cleere way to the Gods.
Seruil. Good Gods. Titus. We cannot take this for answer, sir. Flaminius within. Seruilius helpe, my Lord, my Lord. Enter Timon in a rage. Tim. What, are my dores oppos'd against my passage?
[1155]
Haue I bin euer free, and must my house Be my retentiue Enemy? My Gaole? The place which I haue Feasted, does it now (Like all Mankinde) shew me an Iron heart?
Luci. Put in now Titus. Tit.
[1160]
My Lord, heere is my Bill.
Luci. Here's mine. 1. Var. And mine, my Lord. 2. Var. And ours, my Lord. Philo. All our Billes. Tim.
[1165]

Knocke me downe with 'em, cleaue mee to the

Girdle.

Luc. Alas, my Lord. Tim. Cut my heart in summes. Tit. Mine, fifty Talents. Tim.
[1170]
Tell out my blood.
Luc. Fiue thousand Crownes, my Lord. Tim. Fiue thousand drops payes that. What yours? and yours? 1. Var. My Lord. 2. Var.
[1175]
My Lord.
Tim. Teare me, take me, and the Gods fall vpon you. Exit Timon. Hort.

Faith I perceiue our Masters may throwe their

caps at their money, these debts may well be call'd despe­

rate ones, for a madman owes 'em.

Exeunt. Enter Timon. Timon.
[1180]

They haue e'ene put my breath from mee the

slaues. Creditors? Diuels.

Stew. My deere Lord. Tim. What if it should be so? Stew. My Lord. Tim.
[1185]
Ile haue it so. My Steward?
Stew. Heere my Lord. Tim. So fitly? Go, bid all my Friends againe, Lucius, Lucullus, and Sempronius Vllorxa: All, Ile once more feast the Rascals. Stew.
[1190]

O my Lord, you onely speake from your distra­

cted soule; there's not so much left to furnish out a mo­

derate Table.

Tim. Be it not in thy care: Go I charge thee, inuite them all, let in the tide
[1195]
Of Knaues once more: my Cooke and Ile prouide.
Exeunt
 

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<div type="scene" n="4" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 4]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Varro's man, meeting others. All Timons Creditors to
      <lb/>wait for his comming out. Then enter Lucius
      <lb/>and Hortensius.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tim-vsr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Var. man.</speaker>
      <l n="1067">Well met, goodmorrow<hi rend="italic">Titus</hi>&amp;<hi rend="italic">Hortensius</hi>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0705-0.jpg" n="87"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1068">The like to you kinde<hi rend="italic">Varro</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-hor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hort.</speaker>
      <l n="1069">
         <hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>, what do we meet together?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1070">I, and I think one businesse do's command vs all.</l>
      <l n="1071">For mine is money.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1072">So is theirs, and ours.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Philotus.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1073">And sir<hi rend="italic">Philotus</hi>too.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-phi">
      <speaker rend="italic">Phil.</speaker>
      <l n="1074">Good day at once.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1075">Welcome good Brother.</l>
      <l n="1076">What do you thinke the houre?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-phi">
      <speaker rend="italic">Phil.</speaker>
      <l n="1077">Labouring for Nine.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1078">So much?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-phi">
      <speaker rend="italic">Phil.</speaker>
      <l n="1079">Is not my Lord seene yet?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1080">Not yet.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-phi">
      <speaker rend="italic">Phil.</speaker>
      <l n="1081">I wonder on't, he was wont to shine at seauen.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1082">I, but the dayes are waxt shorter with him:</l>
      <l n="1083">You must consider, that a Prodigall course</l>
      <l n="1084">Is like the Sunnes, but not like his recouerable, I feare:</l>
      <p n="1085">'Tis deepest Winter in Lord<hi rend="italic">Timons</hi>purse, that is: One
      <lb n="1086"/>may reach deepe enough, and yet finde little.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-phi">
      <speaker rend="italic">Phil.</speaker>
      <l n="1087">I am of your feare, for that.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1088">Ile shew you how t'obserue a strange euent:</l>
      <l n="1089">Your Lord sends now for Money?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-hor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hort.</speaker>
      <l n="1090">Most true, he doe's.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1091">And he weares Iewels now of<hi rend="italic">Timons</hi>guift,</l>
      <l n="1092">For which I waite for money.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-hor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hort.</speaker>
      <l n="1093">It is against my heart.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1094">Marke how strange it showes,</l>
      <l n="1095">
         <hi rend="italic">Timon</hi>in this, should pay more then he owes:</l>
      <l n="1096">And e'ne as if your Lord should weare rich Iewels,</l>
      <l n="1097">And send for money for 'em.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-hor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hort.</speaker>
      <l n="1098">I'me weary of this Charge,</l>
      <l n="1099">The Gods can witnesse:</l>
      <l n="1100">I know my Lord hath spent of<hi rend="italic">Timons</hi>wealth,</l>
      <l n="1101">And now Ingratitude, makes it worse then stealth.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-var">
      <speaker rend="italic">Varro.</speaker>
      <l n="1102">Yes, mine's three thousand Crownes:</l>
      <l n="1103">What's yours<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1104">Fiue thousand mine.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-var">
      <speaker rend="italic">Varro.</speaker>
      <l n="1105">'Tis much deepe, and it should seem by th'sum</l>
      <l n="1106">Your Masters confidence was aboue mine,</l>
      <l n="1107">Else surely his had equall'd.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic" type="entrance">Enter Flaminius.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1108">One of Lord<hi rend="italic">Timons</hi>men.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-lcl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luc.</speaker>
      <p n="1109">
         <hi rend="italic">Flaminius</hi>? Sir, a word: Pray is my Lord readie
      <lb n="1110"/>to come forth?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flm">
      <speaker rend="italic">Flam.</speaker>
      <l n="1111">No, indeed he is not.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1112">We attend his Lordship: pray signifie so much.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flm">
      <speaker rend="italic">Flam.</speaker>
      <p n="1113">I need not tell him that, he knowes you are too
      <lb rend="turnunder" n="1114"/>
         <pc rend="turnunder">(</pc>diligent.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic" type="entrance">Enter Steward in a Cloake, muffled.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1115">Ha: is not that his Steward muffled so?</l>
      <l n="1116">He goes away in a Clowd: Call him, call him.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1117">Do you heare, sir?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-vsr.2">
      <speaker rend="italic">2. Varro.</speaker>
      <l n="1118">By your leaue, sir.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flv">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <l n="1119">What do ye aske of me, my Friend.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1120">We waite for certaine Money heere, sir.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flv">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <l n="1121">I, if Money were as certaine as your waiting,</l>
      <l n="1122">'Twere sure enough.</l>
      <l n="1123">Why then preferr'd you not your summes and Billes</l>
      <l n="1124">When your false Masters eate of my Lords meat?</l>
      <l n="1125">Then they could smile, and fawne vpon his debts.</l>
      <l n="1126">And take downe th'Intrest into their glutt'nous Mawes.</l>
      <l n="1127">You do your selues but wrong, to stirre me vp,</l>
      <l n="1128">Let me passe quietly:</l>
      <l n="1129">Beleeue't, my Lord and I haue made an end,</l>
      <l n="1130">I haue no more to reckon, he to spend.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1131">I, but this answer will not serue.</l>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flv">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <l n="1132">If't 'twill not serue, 'tis not so base as you,</l>
      <l n="1133">For you serue Knaues.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-vsr.1">
      <speaker rend="italic">1. Varro.</speaker>
      <p n="1134">How? What does his casheer'd Worship
      <lb n="1135"/>mutter<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-vsr.2">
      <speaker rend="italic">2. Varro.</speaker>
      <p n="1136">No matter what, hee's poore, and that's re­
      <lb n="1137"/>uenge enough. Who can speake broader, then hee that
      <lb n="1138"/>has no house to put his head in<c rend="italic">?</c>Such may rayle against
      <lb n="1139"/>great buildings.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic" type="entrance">Enter Seruilius.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <p n="1140">Oh here's<hi rend="italic">Seruilius</hi>: now wee shall know some
      <lb n="1141"/>answere.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-ser">
      <speaker rend="italic">Seru.</speaker>
      <p n="1142">If I might beseech you Gentlemen, to repayre
      <lb n="1143"/>some other houre, I should deriue much from't. For tak't
      <lb n="1144"/>of my soule, my Lord leanes wondrously to discontent:
      <lb n="1145"/>His comfortable temper has forsooke him, he's much out
      <lb n="1146"/>of health, and keepes his Chamber.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1147">Many do keepe their Chambers, are not sicke:</l>
      <l n="1148">And if it be so farre beyond his health,</l>
      <l n="1149">Me thinkes he should the sooner pay his debts,</l>
      <l n="1150">And make a cleere way to the Gods.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-svl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Seruil.</speaker>
      <l n="1151">Good Gods.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Titus.</speaker>
      <l n="1152">We cannot take this for answer, sir.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flm">
      <speaker rend="italic">Flaminius</speaker>
      <stage rend="italic inline" type="buisiness">within.</stage>
      <l n="1153">
         <hi rend="italic">Seruilius</hi>helpe, my Lord, my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Timon in a rage.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1154">What, are my dores oppos'd against my passage?</l>
      <l n="1155">Haue I bin euer free, and must my house</l>
      <l n="1156">Be my retentiue Enemy? My Gaole?</l>
      <l n="1157">The place which I haue Feasted, does it now</l>
      <l n="1158">(Like all Mankinde) shew me an Iron heart?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1159">Put in now<hi rend="italic">Titus</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1160">My Lord, heere is my Bill.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luci.</speaker>
      <l n="1161">Here's mine.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-vsr.1">
      <speaker rend="italic">1. Var.</speaker>
      <l n="1162">And mine, my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-vsr.2">
      <speaker rend="italic">2. Var.</speaker>
      <l n="1163">And ours, my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-phi">
      <speaker rend="italic">Philo.</speaker>
      <l n="1164">All our Billes.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <p n="1165">Knocke me downe with 'em, cleaue mee to the
      <lb n="1166"/>Girdle.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-lcl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luc.</speaker>
      <l n="1167">Alas, my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1168">Cut my heart in summes.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tit">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1169">Mine, fifty Talents.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1170">Tell out my blood.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-lcl">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luc.</speaker>
      <l n="1171">Fiue thousand Crownes, my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1172">Fiue thousand drops payes that.</l>
      <l n="1173">What yours? and yours?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-vsr.1">
      <speaker rend="italic">1. Var.</speaker>
      <l n="1174">My Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-vsr.2">
      <speaker rend="italic">2. Var.</speaker>
      <l n="1175">My Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1176">Teare me, take me, and the Gods fall vpon you.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit Timon.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tim-hor">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hort.</speaker>
      <p n="1177">Faith I perceiue our Masters may throwe their
      <lb n="1178"/>caps at their money, these debts may well be call'd despe­
      <lb n="1179"/>rate ones, for a madman owes 'em.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Timon.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Timon.</speaker>
      <p n="1180">They haue e'ene put my breath from mee the
      <lb n="1181"/>slaues. Creditors? Diuels.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flv">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <l n="1182">My deere Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1183">What if it should be so?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flv">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <l n="1184">My Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1185">Ile haue it so. My Steward?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flv">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <l n="1186">Heere my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1187">So fitly? Go, bid all my Friends againe,</l>
      <l n="1188">
         <hi rend="italic">Lucius, Lucullus</hi>, and<hi rend="italic">Sempronius Vllorxa</hi>: All,</l>
      <l n="1189">Ile once more feast the Rascals.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tim-flv">
      <speaker rend="italic">Stew.</speaker>
      <p n="1190">O my Lord, you onely speake from your distra­
      <lb n="1191"/>cted soule; there's not so much left to furnish out a mo­
      <lb n="1192"/>derate Table.</p>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0706-0.jpg" n="88"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-tim-tim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tim.</speaker>
      <l n="1193">Be it not in thy care:</l>
      <l n="1194">Go I charge thee, inuite them all, let in the tide</l>
      <l n="1195">Of Knaues once more: my Cooke and Ile prouide.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt</stage>
</div>

        
        

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