The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: dd5r - Tragedies, p. 45

Left Column


The Lamentable Tragedie of Titus Andronicus. What hath he sent her? Nurse.

A deuill.

Aron.
[1655]

Why then she is the Deuils Dam: a ioyfull issue.

Nurse. A ioylesse, dismall, blacke &, sorrowfull issue, Heere is the babe as loathsome as a toad, Among'st the fairest breeders of our clime, The Empresse sends it thee, thy stampe, thy seale,
[1660]
And bids thee christen it with thy daggers point.
Aron. Out you whore, is black so base a hue? Sweet blowse, you are a beautious blossome sure. Deme.

Villaine what hast thou done?

Aron. That which thou canst not vndoe
[1665]
Chi. Thou hast vndone our mother.
Deme. And therein hellish dog, thou hast vndone, Woe to her chance, and damn'd her loathed choyce, Accur'st the off‑spring of so foule a fiend. Chi.

It shall not liue.

Aron.
[1670]

It shall not die.

Nurse.

Aaron it must, the mother wils it so.

Aron. What, must it Nurse? Then let no man but I Doe execution on my flesh and blood. Deme. Ile broach the Tadpole on my Rapiers point:
[1675]
Nurse giue it me, my sword shall soone dispatch it.
Aron. Sooner this sword shall plough thy bowels vp. Stay murtherous villaines, will you kill your brother? Now by the burning Tapers of the skie, That sho'ne shone so brightly when this Boy was got,
[1680]
He dies vpon my Semitars sharpe point, That touches this my first borne sonne and heire. I tell you young­lings, not Enceladus With all his threatning band of Typhons broode, Nor great Alcides, nor the God of warre,
[1685]
Shall ceaze this prey out of his fathers hands: What, what, ye sanguine shallow harted Boyes, Ye white‑limb'd walls, ye Ale‑house painted signes, Cole‑blacke is better then another hue, In that it scornes to beare another hue:
[1690]
For all the water in the Ocean, Can neuer turne the Swans blacke legs to white, Although she laue them hourely in the flood: Tell the Empresse from me, I am of age To keepe mine owne, excuse it how she can.
Deme.
[1695]

Wilt thou betray thy noble mistris thus?

Aron. My mistris is my mistris: this my selfe, The vigour, and the picture of my youth: This, before all the world do I preferre, This mauger all the world will I keepe safe,
[1700]
Or some of you shall smoake for it in Rome.
Deme.

By this our mother is for euer sham'd.

Chi.

Rome will despise her for this foule escape.

Nur.

The Emperour in his rage will doome her death.

Chi.

I blush to thinke vpon this ignominie.

Aron.
[1705]
Why ther's the priuiledge your beauty beares: Fie trecherous hue, that will betray with blushing The close enacts and counsels of the hart: Heer's a young Lad fram'd of another leere, Looke how the blacke slaue smiles vpon the father;
[1710]
As who should say, old Lad I am thine owne. He is your brother Lords, sensibly fed Of that selfe blood that first gaue life to you, And from that wombe where you imprisoned were He is infranchised and come to light:
[1715]
Nay he is your brother by the surer side, Although my seale be stamped in his face.
Nurse.

Aaron what shall I say vnto the Empresse?

Dem. Aduise thee Aaron, what is to be done,

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[full image]

Right Column


And we will all subscribe to thy aduise:
[1720]
Saue thou the child, so we may all be safe.
Aron. Then sit we downe and let vs all consult. My sonne and I will haue the winde of you: Keepe there, now talke at pleasure of your safety. Deme.

How many women saw this childe of his?

Aron.
[1725]
Why so braue Lords, when we ioyne in league I am a Lambe: but if you braue the Moore, The chafed Bore, the mountaine Lyonesse, The Ocean swells not so at Aaron stormes: But say againe, how many saw the childe?
Nurse.
[1730]
Cornelia, the midwife, and my selfe, And none else but the deliuered Empresse.
Aron. The Empresse, the Midwife, and your selfe, Two may keepe counsell, when the third's away: Goe to the Empresse, tell her this I said, He kils her
[1735]
Weeke, weeke, so cries a Pigge prepared to th'spit.
Deme. What mean'st thou Aaron? Wherefore did'st thou this? Aron. O Lord sir, 'tis a deed of pollicie? Shall she liue to betray this guilt of our's:
[1740]
A long tongu'd babling Gossip? No Lords no: And now be it knowne to you my full intent. Not farre, one Muliteus my Country‑man His wife but yesternight was brought to bed, His childe is like to her, faire as you are:
[1745]
Goe packe with him, and giue the mother gold, And tell them both the circumstance of all, And how by this their Childe shall be aduaunc'd, And be receiued for the Emperours heyre, And substituted in the place of mine,
[1750]
To calme this tempest whirling in the Court, And let the Emperour dandle him for his owne. Harke ye Lords, ye see I haue giuen her physicke, And you must needs bestow her funerall, The fields are neere, and you are gallant Groomes:
[1755]
This done, see that you take no longer daies But send the Midwife presently to me. The Midwife and the Nurse well made away, Then let the Ladies tattle what they please.
Chi.

Aaron I see thou wilt not trust the ayre with secrets.

Deme.
[1760]
For this care of Tamora, (crets. Her selfe, and hers are highly bound to thee.
Exeunt Aron. Now to the Gothes, as swift as Swallow flies, There to dispose this treasure in mine armes, And secretly to greete the Empresse friends:
[1765]
Come on you thick‑lipt‑slaue, Ile beare you hence, For it is you that puts vs to our shifts: Ile make you feed on berries, and on rootes, And feed on curds and whay, and sucke the Goate, And cabbin in a Caue, and bring you vp
[1770]
To be a warriour, and command a Campe.
Exit
[Act 4, Scene 3] Enter Titus, old Marcus, young Lucius, and other gentlemen with bowes, and Titus beares the arrowes with Letters on the end of them. Tit. Come Marcus, come, kinsmen this is the way. Sir Boy let me see your Archerie, Looke yee draw home enough, and 'tis there straight: Terras Astrea reliquit, be you remembred Marcus.
[1775]
She's gone, she's fled, sirs take you to your tooles, You Cosens shall goe sound the Ocean: And cast your nets, haply you may find her in the Sea, Yet ther's as little iustice as at Land: No Publius and Sempronius, you must doe it, 'Tis

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[Act 4, Scene 3] Enter Titus, old Marcus, young Lucius, and other gentlemen with bowes, and Titus beares the arrowes with Letters on the end of them. Tit. Come Marcus, come, kinsmen this is the way. Sir Boy let me see your Archerie, Looke yee draw home enough, and 'tis there straight: Terras Astrea reliquit, be you remembred Marcus.
[1775]
She's gone, she's fled, sirs take you to your tooles, You Cosens shall goe sound the Ocean: And cast your nets, haply you may find her in the Sea, Yet ther's as little iustice as at Land: No Publius and Sempronius, you must doe it,
[1780]
'Tis you must dig with Mattocke, and with Spade, And pierce the inmost Center of the earth: Then when you come to Plutoes Region, I pray you deliuer him this petition, Tell him it is for iustice, and for aide,
[1785]
And that it comes from old Andronicus, Shaken with sorrowes in vngratefull Rome. Ah Rome! Well, well, I made thee miserable, What time I threw the peoples suffrages On him that thus doth tyrannize ore me.
[1790]
Goe get you gone, and pray be carefull all, And leaue you not a man of warre vnsearcht, This wicked Emperour may haue shipt her hence, And kinsmen then we may goe pipe for iustice.
Marc. O Publius is not this a heauie case
[1795]
To see thy Noble Vnckle thus distract?
Publ. Therefore my Lords it highly vs concernes, By day and night t' attend him carefully: And feede his humour kindely as we may, Till time beget some carefull remedie. Marc.
[1800]
Kinsmen, his sorrowes are past remedie. Ioyne with the Gothes, and with reuengefull warre, Take wreake on Rome for this ingratitude, And vengeance on the Traytor Saturnine.
Tit. Publius how now? how now my Maisters?
[1805]
What haue you met with her?
Publ. No my good Lord, but Pluto sends you word, If you will haue reuenge from hell you shall, Marrie for iustice she is so imploy'd, He thinkes with Ioue in heauen, or some where else:
[1810]
So that perforce you must needs stay a time.
Tit. He doth me wrong to feed me with delayes, Ile diue into the burning Lake below, And pull her out of Acaron by the heeles. Marcus we are but shrubs, no Cedars we,
[1815]
No big‑bon'd‑men, fram'd of the Cyclops size, But mettall Marcus steele to the very backe, Yet wrung with wrongs more then our backe can beare: And sith there's no iustice in earth nor hell, We will sollicite heauen, and moue the Gods
[1820]
To send downe Iustice for to wreake our wongs wrongs : Come to this geare, you are a good Archer Marcus. He giues them the Arrowes. Ad Iouem, that's for you: here ad Appollonem, Ad Martem, that's for my selfe, Heere Boy to Pallas, heere to Mercury,
[1825]
To Saturnine, to Caius, not to Saturnine, You were as good to shoote against the winde. Too it Boy, Marcus loose when I bid: Of my word, I haue written to effect, Ther's not a God left vnsollicited.
Marc.
[1830]
Kinsmen, shoot all your shafts into the Court, We will afflict the Emperour in his pride.
Tit. Now Maisters draw, Oh well said Lucius: Good Boy in Virgoes lap, giue it Pallas. Marc. My Lord, I aime a Mile beyond the Moone,
[1835]
Your letter is with Iupiter by this.
Tit. Ha, ha, Publius, Publius, what hast thou done? See, see, thou hast shot off one of Taurus hornes. Mar. This was the sport my Lord, when Publius shot, The Bull being gal'd, gaue Aries such a knocke,
[1840]
That downe fell both the Rams hornes in the Court, And who should finde them but the Empresse villaine: She laught, and told the Moore he should not choose But giue them to his Maister for a present.
Tit.

Why there it goes, God giue your Lordship ioy.

Enter the Clowne with a basket and two Pigeons in it. Titus.
[1845]
Newes, newes, from heauen, Marcus the poast is come. Sirrah, what tydings? haue you any letters? Shall I haue Iustice, what sayes Iupiter?
Clowne.

Ho the Iibbetmaker, he sayes that he hath ta­

[1850]

ken them downe againe, for the man must not be hang'd

till the next weeke.

Tit.

But what sayes Iupiter I aske thee?

Clowne. Alas sir I know not Iupiter: I neuer dranke with him in all my life. Tit.
[1855]

Why villaine art not thou the Carrier?

Clowne.

I of my Pigions sir, nothing else.

Tit.

Why, did'st thou not come from heauen?

Clowne. From heauen? Alas sir, I neuer came there, God forbid I should be so bold, to presse to heauen in my
[1860]
young dayes. Why I am going with my pigeons to the Tribunall Plebs, to take vp a matter of brawle, betwixt my Vncle, and one of the Emperialls men.
Mar. Why sir, that is as fit as can be to serue for your Oration, and let him deliuer the Pigions to the Emperour from you. Tit.
[1865]
Tell mee, can you deliuer an Oration to the Em­ perour with a Grace?
Clowne.

Nay truely sir, I could neuer say grace in all

my life.

Tit. Sirrah come hither, make no more adoe, But giue your Pigeons to the Emperour,
[1870]
By me thou shalt haue Iustice at his hands. Hold, hold, meane while her's money for thy charges. Giue me pen and inke. Sirrah, can you with a Grace deliuer a Supplication?
Clowne.

I sir

Titus.
[1875]

Then here is a Supplication for you, and when

you come to him, at the first approach you must kneele,

then kisse his foote, then deliuer vp your Pigeons, and

then looke for your reward. Ile be at hand sir, see you do

it brauely.

Clowne.
[1880]

I warrant you sir, let me alone.

Tit. Sirrha hast thou a knife? Come let me see it. Heere Marcus, fold it in the Oration, For thou hast made it like an humble Suppliant: And when thou hast giuen it the Emperour,
[1885]
Knocke at my dore, and tell me what he sayes.
Clowne.

God be with you sir, I will.

Exit. Tit.

Come Marcus let vs goe, Publius follow me.

Exeunt.
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="3" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 4, Scene 3]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Titus, old Marcus, young Lucius, and other gentlemen
      <lb/>with bowes, and Titus beares the arrowes with
      <lb/>Letters on the end of them.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1771">Come<hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>, come, kinsmen this is the way.</l>
      <l n="1772">Sir Boy let me see your Archerie,</l>
      <l n="1773">Looke yee draw home enough, and 'tis there straight:</l>
      <l n="1774">
         <hi rend="italic">Terras Astrea reliquit</hi>, be you remembred<hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>.</l>
      <l n="1775">She's gone, she's fled, sirs take you to your tooles,</l>
      <l n="1776">You Cosens shall goe sound the Ocean:</l>
      <l n="1777">And cast your nets, haply you may find her in the Sea,</l>
      <l n="1778">Yet ther's as little iustice as at Land:</l>
      <l n="1779">No<hi rend="italic">Publius</hi>and<hi rend="italic">Sempronius</hi>, you must doe it,</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0664-0.jpg" n="46"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="1780">'Tis you must dig with Mattocke, and with Spade,</l>
      <l n="1781">And pierce the inmost Center of the earth:</l>
      <l n="1782">Then when you come to<hi rend="italic">Plutoes</hi>Region,</l>
      <l n="1783">I pray you deliuer him this petition,</l>
      <l n="1784">Tell him it is for iustice, and for aide,</l>
      <l n="1785">And that it comes from old<hi rend="italic">Andronicus</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1786">Shaken with sorrowes in vngratefull Rome.</l>
      <l n="1787">Ah Rome! Well, well, I made thee miserable,</l>
      <l n="1788">What time I threw the peoples suffrages</l>
      <l n="1789">On him that thus doth tyrannize ore me.</l>
      <l n="1790">Goe get you gone, and pray be carefull all,</l>
      <l n="1791">And leaue you not a man of warre vnsearcht,</l>
      <l n="1792">This wicked Emperour may haue shipt her hence,</l>
      <l n="1793">And kinsmen then we may goe pipe for iustice.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-mrc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Marc.</speaker>
      <l n="1794">O<hi rend="italic">Publius</hi>is not this a heauie case</l>
      <l n="1795">To see thy Noble Vnckle thus distract?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-pub">
      <speaker rend="italic">Publ.</speaker>
      <l n="1796">Therefore my Lords it highly vs concernes,</l>
      <l n="1797">By day and night t' attend him carefully:</l>
      <l n="1798">And feede his humour kindely as we may,</l>
      <l n="1799">Till time beget some carefull remedie.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-mrc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Marc.</speaker>
      <l n="1800">Kinsmen, his sorrowes are past remedie.</l>
      <l n="1801">Ioyne with the Gothes, and with reuengefull warre,</l>
      <l n="1802">Take wreake on Rome for this ingratitude,</l>
      <l n="1803">And vengeance on the Traytor<hi rend="italic">Saturnine</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1804">
         <hi rend="italic">Publius</hi>how now? how now my Maisters?</l>
      <l n="1805">What haue you met with her?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-pub">
      <speaker rend="italic">Publ.</speaker>
      <l n="1806">No my good Lord, but<hi rend="italic">Pluto</hi>sends you word,</l>
      <l n="1807">If you will haue reuenge from hell you shall,</l>
      <l n="1808">Marrie for iustice she is so imploy'd,</l>
      <l n="1809">He thinkes with<hi rend="italic">Ioue</hi>in heauen, or some where else:</l>
      <l n="1810">So that perforce you must needs stay a time.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1811">He doth me wrong to feed me with delayes,</l>
      <l n="1812">Ile diue into the burning Lake below,</l>
      <l n="1813">And pull her out of<hi rend="italic">Acaron</hi>by the heeles.</l>
      <l n="1814">
         <hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>we are but shrubs, no Cedars we,</l>
      <l n="1815">No big‑bon'd‑men, fram'd of the Cyclops size,</l>
      <l n="1816">But mettall<hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>steele to the very backe,</l>
      <l n="1817">Yet wrung with wrongs more then our backe can beare:</l>
      <l n="1818">And sith there's no iustice in earth nor hell,</l>
      <l n="1819">We will sollicite heauen, and moue the Gods</l>
      <l n="1820">To send downe Iustice for to wreake our<choice>
            <orig>wongs</orig>
            <corr>wrongs</corr>
         </choice>:</l>
      <l n="1821">Come to this geare, you are a good Archer<hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="business">He giues them the Arrowes.</stage>
      <l n="1822">
         <hi rend="italic">Ad Iouem</hi>, that's for you: here ad<hi rend="italic">Appollonem</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1823">
         <hi rend="italic">Ad Martem</hi>, that's for my selfe,</l>
      <l n="1824">Heere Boy to<hi rend="italic">Pallas</hi>, heere to<hi rend="italic">Mercury</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1825">To<hi rend="italic">Saturnine</hi>, to<hi rend="italic">Caius</hi>, not to<hi rend="italic">Saturnine</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1826">You were as good to shoote against the winde.</l>
      <l n="1827">Too it Boy,<hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>loose when I bid:</l>
      <l n="1828">Of my word, I haue written to effect,</l>
      <l n="1829">Ther's not a God left vnsollicited.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-mrc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Marc.</speaker>
      <l n="1830">Kinsmen, shoot all your shafts into the Court,</l>
      <l n="1831">We will afflict the Emperour in his pride.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1832">Now Maisters draw, Oh well said<hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>:</l>
      <l n="1833">Good Boy in<hi rend="italic">Virgoes</hi>lap, giue it<hi rend="italic">Pallas</hi>.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-mrc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Marc.</speaker>
      <l n="1834">My Lord, I aime a Mile beyond the Moone,</l>
      <l n="1835">Your letter is with<hi rend="italic">Iupiter</hi>by this.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1836">Ha, ha,<hi rend="italic">Publius, Publius,</hi>what hast thou done?</l>
      <l n="1837">See, see, thou hast shot off one of<hi rend="italic">Taurus</hi>hornes.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-mrc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="1838">This was the sport my Lord, when<hi rend="italic">Publius</hi>shot,</l>
      <l n="1839">The Bull being gal'd, gaue<hi rend="italic">Aries</hi>such a knocke,</l>
      <l n="1840">That downe fell both the Rams hornes in the Court,</l>
      <l n="1841">And who should finde them but the Empresse villaine:</l>
      <l n="1842">She laught, and told the Moore he should not choose</l>
      <l n="1843">But giue them to his Maister for a present.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <p n="1844">Why there it goes, God giue your Lordship ioy.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter the Clowne with a basket and two Pigeons in it.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Titus.</speaker>
      <l n="1845">Newes, newes, from heauen,</l>
      <l n="1846">
         <hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>the poast is come.</l>
      <l n="1847">Sirrah, what tydings? haue you any letters?</l>
      <l n="1848">Shall I haue Iustice, what sayes<hi rend="italic">Iupiter</hi>?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <p n="1849">Ho the Iibbetmaker, he sayes that he hath ta­
      <lb n="1850"/>ken them downe againe, for the man must not be hang'd
      <lb n="1851"/>till the next weeke.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <p n="1852">But what sayes<hi rend="italic">Iupiter</hi>I aske thee?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <l n="1853">Alas sir I know not<hi rend="italic">Iupiter</hi>:</l>
      <l n="1854">I neuer dranke with him in all my life.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <p n="1855">Why villaine art not thou the Carrier?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <p n="1856">I of my Pigions sir, nothing else.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <p n="1857">Why, did'st thou not come from heauen?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <l n="1858">From heauen? Alas sir, I neuer came there,</l>
      <l n="1859">God forbid I should be so bold, to presse to heauen in my</l>
      <l n="1860">young dayes. Why I am going with my pigeons to the</l>
      <l n="1861">Tribunall Plebs, to take vp a matter of brawle, betwixt</l>
      <l n="1862">my Vncle, and one of the Emperialls men.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-mrc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="1863">Why sir, that is as fit as can be to serue for your</l>
      <l n="1864">Oration, and let him deliuer the Pigions to the Emperour
      <lb/>from you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1865">Tell mee, can you deliuer an Oration to the Em­
      <lb/>perour with a Grace?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <p n="1866">Nay truely sir, I could neuer say grace in all
      <lb n="1867"/>my life.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1868">Sirrah come hither, make no more adoe,</l>
      <l n="1869">But giue your Pigeons to the Emperour,</l>
      <l n="1870">By me thou shalt haue Iustice at his hands.</l>
      <l n="1871">Hold, hold, meane while her's money for thy charges.</l>
      <l n="1872">Giue me pen and inke.</l>
      <l n="1873">Sirrah, can you with a Grace deliuer a Supplication?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <p n="1874">I sir</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Titus.</speaker>
      <p n="1875">Then here is a Supplication for you, and when
      <lb n="1876"/>you come to him, at the first approach you must kneele,
      <lb n="1877"/>then kisse his foote, then deliuer vp your Pigeons, and
      <lb n="1878"/>then looke for your reward. Ile be at hand sir, see you do
      <lb n="1879"/>it brauely.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <p n="1880">I warrant you sir, let me alone.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <l n="1881">Sirrha hast thou a knife? Come let me see it.</l>
      <l n="1882">Heere<hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>, fold it in the Oration,</l>
      <l n="1883">For thou hast made it like an humble Suppliant:</l>
      <l n="1884">And when thou hast giuen it the Emperour,</l>
      <l n="1885">Knocke at my dore, and tell me what he sayes.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <p n="1886">God be with you sir, I will.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tit-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tit.</speaker>
      <p n="1887">Come<hi rend="italic">Marcus</hi>let vs goe,<hi rend="italic">Publius</hi>follow me.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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