The Bodleian First Folio

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Reference: Y2v - Comedies, p. 256

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Twelfe Night, or, What you will. Till I had made mine owne occasion mellow What my estate is. Cap. That were hard to compasse, Because she will admit no kinde of suite,
[90]
No, not the Dukes.
Vio. There is a faire behauiour in thee Captaine, And though that nature, with a beauteous wall Doth oft close in pollution: yet of thee I will beleeue thou hast a minde that suites
[95]
With this thy faire and outward charracter. I prethee (and Ile pay thee bounteously) Conceale me what I am, and be my ayde, For such disguise as haply shall become The forme of my intent. Ile serue this Duke,
[100]
Thou shalt present me as an Eunuch to him, It may be worth thy paines: for I can sing, And speake to him in many sorts of Musicke, That will allow me very worth his seruice. What else may hap, to time I will commit,
[105]
Onely shape thou thy silence to my wit.
Cap. Be you his Eunuch, and your Mute Ile bee, When my tongue blabs, then let mine eyes not see. Vio. I thanke thee: Lead me on. Exeunt
Scæna Tertia. [Act 1, Scene 3] Enter Sir Toby, and Maria. Sir To.

What a plague meanes my Neece to take the

[110]

death of her brother thus? I am sure care's an enemie to

life.

Mar.

By my troth sir Toby, you must come in earlyer

a nights: your Cosin, my Lady, takes great exceptions

to your ill houres.

To.
[115]

Why let her except, before excepted.

Ma.

I, but you must confine your selfe within the

modest limits of order.

To.

Confine? Ile confine my selfe no finer then I am:

these cloathes are good enough to drinke in, and so bee

[120]

these boots too: and they be not, let them hang them­

selues in their owne straps.

Ma.

That quaffing and drinking will vndoe you: I

heard my Lady talke of it yesterday: and of a foolish

knight that you brought in one night here, to be hir woer

To.
[125]

Who, Sir Andrew Ague‑cheeke?

Ma.

I he.

To.

He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.

Ma.

What's that to th'purpose?

To.

Why he ha's three thousand ducates a yeare.

Ma.
[130]
I, but hee'l haue but a yeare in all these ducates: He's a very foole, and a prodigall.
To.

Fie, that you'l say so: he playes o'th Viol‑de‑gam­

boys, and speaks three or four languages word for word

without booke, & hath all the good gifts of nature.

Ma.
[135]

He hath indeed, almost naturall: for besides that

he's a foole, he's a great quarreller: and but that hee hath

the gift of a Coward, to allay the gust he hath in quarrel­

ling, 'tis thought among the prudent, he would quickely

haue the gift of a graue.

Tob.
[140]

By this hand they are scoundrels and substra­

ctors that say so of him. Who are they?

Ma.

They that adde moreour, hee's drunke nightly

in your company.

To.

With drinking healths to my Neece: Ile drinke

The corner of this page has been torn away, and the tears slightly obscure these last lines.

Image


[full image]

Right Column


[145]

to her as long as there is a passage in my throat, & drinke

in Illyria: he's a Coward and a Coystrill that will not

drinke to my Neece. till his braines turne o'th toe, like

a parish top. What wench? Castiliano vulgo: for here coms

Sir Andrew Agueface.

Enter Sir Andrew. And.
[150]

Sir Toby Belch. How now sir Toby Belch?

To.

Sweet sir Andrew.

And.

Blesse you faire Shrew.

Mar.

And you too sir.

Tob.

Accost Sir Andrew, accost.

And.
[155]

What's that?

To.

My Neeces Chamber‑maid.

Ma.

Good Mistris accost, I desire better acquaintance

Ma.

My name is Mary sir.

And.

Good mistris Mary, accost.

To,
[160]

You mistake knight: Accost, is front her, boord

her, woe her, assayle her.

And.

By my troth I would not vndertake her in this

company. Is that the meaning of Accost?

Ma.

Far you well Gentlemen.

To.
[165]

And thou let part so Sir Andrew, would thou

mightst neuer draw sword agen.

And.

And you part so mistris, I would I might neuer

draw sword agen: Faire Lady, doe you thinke you haue

fooles in hand?

Ma.
[170]

Sir, I haue not you by'th hand.

An.

Marry but you shall haue, and heeres my hand.

Ma.

Now sir, thought is free: I pray you bring your

hand to'th Buttry barre, and let it drinke.

An.

Wherefore (sweet‑heart ?) What's your Meta­

[175]

phor?

Ma.

It's dry sir.

And.

Why I thinke so: I am not such an asse, but I

can keepe my hand dry. But what's your iest?

Ma.

A dry iest Sir.

And.
[180]

Are you full of them?

Ma.

I Sir, I haue them at my fingers ends: marry now

I let go your hand, I am barren.

Exit Maria To.

O knight, thou lack'st a cup of Canarie: when did

I see thee so put downe?

An.
[185]

Neuer in your life I thinke, vnlesse you see Ca­

narie put me downe: mee thinkes sometimes I haue no

more wit then a Christian, or an ordinary man ha's: but I

am a great eater of beefe, and I beleeue that does harme

to my wit.

To.
[190]

No question

An.

And I thought that, I'de forsweare it. Ile ride

home to morrow sir Toby.

To.

Pur‑quoy my deere knight?

An.

What is purquoy? Do, or not do? I would I had

[195]

bestowed that time in the tongues, that I haue in fencing

dancing, and beare‑bayting: O had I but followed the

Arts.

To.

Then hadst thou had an excellent head of haire.

An.

Why, would that haue mended my haire?

To.
[200]

Past question, for thou seest it will not coole my

(nature

An.

But it becoms me wel enough, dost not?

To.

Excellent, it hangs like flax on a distaffe: & I hope

to see a huswife take thee between her legs, & spin it off.

An.
[205]

Faith Ile home to morrow sir Toby, your niece wil

not be seene, or if she be it's four to one, she'l none of me:

the Co unt himselfe here hard by, wooes her.

To.

Shee'l none o'th Count, she'l not match aboue hir

degree, neither in estate, yeares, nor wit: I haue heard her

[210]

swear t. Tut there's life in't man.

And

Download the digital text and images of the play



 
Scæna Tertia. [Act 1, Scene 3] Enter Sir Toby, and Maria. Sir To.

What a plague meanes my Neece to take the

[110]

death of her brother thus? I am sure care's an enemie to

life.

Mar.

By my troth sir Toby, you must come in earlyer

a nights: your Cosin, my Lady, takes great exceptions

to your ill houres.

To.
[115]

Why let her except, before excepted.

Ma.

I, but you must confine your selfe within the

modest limits of order.

To.

Confine? Ile confine my selfe no finer then I am:

these cloathes are good enough to drinke in, and so bee

[120]

these boots too: and they be not, let them hang them­

selues in their owne straps.

Ma.

That quaffing and drinking will vndoe you: I

heard my Lady talke of it yesterday: and of a foolish

knight that you brought in one night here, to be hir woer

To.
[125]

Who, Sir Andrew Ague‑cheeke?

Ma.

I he.

To.

He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.

Ma.

What's that to th'purpose?

To.

Why he ha's three thousand ducates a yeare.

Ma.
[130]
I, but hee'l haue but a yeare in all these ducates: He's a very foole, and a prodigall.
To.

Fie, that you'l say so: he playes o'th Viol‑de‑gam­

boys, and speaks three or four languages word for word

without booke, & hath all the good gifts of nature.

Ma.
[135]

He hath indeed, almost naturall: for besides that

he's a foole, he's a great quarreller: and but that hee hath

the gift of a Coward, to allay the gust he hath in quarrel­

ling, 'tis thought among the prudent, he would quickely

haue the gift of a graue.

Tob.
[140]

By this hand they are scoundrels and substra­

ctors that say so of him. Who are they?

Ma.

They that adde moreour, hee's drunke nightly

in your company.

To.

With drinking healths to my Neece: Ile drinke

The corner of this page has been torn away, and the tears slightly obscure these last lines.
[145]

to her as long as there is a passage in my throat, & drinke

in Illyria: he's a Coward and a Coystrill that will not

drinke to my Neece. till his braines turne o'th toe, like

a parish top. What wench? Castiliano vulgo: for here coms

Sir Andrew Agueface.

Enter Sir Andrew. And.
[150]

Sir Toby Belch. How now sir Toby Belch?

To.

Sweet sir Andrew.

And.

Blesse you faire Shrew.

Mar.

And you too sir.

Tob.

Accost Sir Andrew, accost.

And.
[155]

What's that?

To.

My Neeces Chamber‑maid.

Ma.

Good Mistris accost, I desire better acquaintance

Ma.

My name is Mary sir.

And.

Good mistris Mary, accost.

To,
[160]

You mistake knight: Accost, is front her, boord

her, woe her, assayle her.

And.

By my troth I would not vndertake her in this

company. Is that the meaning of Accost?

Ma.

Far you well Gentlemen.

To.
[165]

And thou let part so Sir Andrew, would thou

mightst neuer draw sword agen.

And.

And you part so mistris, I would I might neuer

draw sword agen: Faire Lady, doe you thinke you haue

fooles in hand?

Ma.
[170]

Sir, I haue not you by'th hand.

An.

Marry but you shall haue, and heeres my hand.

Ma.

Now sir, thought is free: I pray you bring your

hand to'th Buttry barre, and let it drinke.

An.

Wherefore (sweet‑heart ?) What's your Meta­

[175]

phor?

Ma.

It's dry sir.

And.

Why I thinke so: I am not such an asse, but I

can keepe my hand dry. But what's your iest?

Ma.

A dry iest Sir.

And.
[180]

Are you full of them?

Ma.

I Sir, I haue them at my fingers ends: marry now

I let go your hand, I am barren.

Exit Maria To.

O knight, thou lack'st a cup of Canarie: when did

I see thee so put downe?

An.
[185]

Neuer in your life I thinke, vnlesse you see Ca­

narie put me downe: mee thinkes sometimes I haue no

more wit then a Christian, or an ordinary man ha's: but I

am a great eater of beefe, and I beleeue that does harme

to my wit.

To.
[190]

No question

An.

And I thought that, I'de forsweare it. Ile ride

home to morrow sir Toby.

To.

Pur‑quoy my deere knight?

An.

What is purquoy? Do, or not do? I would I had

[195]

bestowed that time in the tongues, that I haue in fencing

dancing, and beare‑bayting: O had I but followed the

Arts.

To.

Then hadst thou had an excellent head of haire.

An.

Why, would that haue mended my haire?

To.
[200]

Past question, for thou seest it will not coole my

(nature

An.

But it becoms me wel enough, dost not?

To.

Excellent, it hangs like flax on a distaffe: & I hope

to see a huswife take thee between her legs, & spin it off.

An.
[205]

Faith Ile home to morrow sir Toby, your niece wil

not be seene, or if she be it's four to one, she'l none of me:

the Co unt himselfe here hard by, wooes her.

To.

Shee'l none o'th Count, she'l not match aboue hir

degree, neither in estate, yeares, nor wit: I haue heard her

[210]

swear t. Tut there's life in't man.

And.

Ile stay a moneth longer. I am a fellow o'th

strangest minde i'th world: I delight in Maskes and Re­

uels sometimes altogether.

To.

Art thou good at these kicke‑chawses Knight ?

And.
[215]

As any man in Illyria, whatsoeuer he be, vnder

the degree of my betters, & yet I will not compare with

an old man.

To.

What is thy excellence in a galliard, knight?

And.

Faith, I can cut a caper.

To.
[220]

And I can cut the Mutton too't.

And.

And I thinke I haue the backe‑tricke, simply as

strong as any man in Illyria.

To.

Wherefore are these things hid? Wherefore haue

these gifts a Curtaine before 'em? Are they like to take

[225]

dust, like mistris Mals picture? Why dost thou not goe

to Church in a Galliard, and come home in a Carranto ?

My verie walke should be a Iigge: I would not so much

as make water but in a Sinke‑a‑pace: What dooest thou

meane? Is it a world to hide vertues in? I did thinke by

[230]

the excellent constitution of thy legge, it was form'd vn­

der the starre of a Galliard.

And.

I, 'tis strong, and it does indifferent well in a

dam'd colour'd stocke. Shall we sit about some Reuels?

To.

What shall we do else: were we not borne vnder

[235]

Taurus?

And.

Taurus? That sides and heart.

To.

No sir, it is leggs and thighes: let me see thee ca­

per. Ha, higher: ha, ha, excellent.

Exeunt.
 

Download the digital text of the play

        
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<div type="scene" n="3">
   <head rend="center">Scæna Tertia.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 1, Scene 3]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Sir Toby, and Maria.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">Sir To.</speaker>
      <p n="109">What a plague meanes my Neece to take the
      <lb n="110"/>death of her brother thus? I am sure care's an enemie to
      <lb n="111"/>life.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <p n="112">By my troth sir<hi rend="italic">Toby</hi>, you must come in earlyer
      <lb n="113"/>a nights: your Cosin, my Lady, takes great exceptions
      <lb n="114"/>to your ill houres.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="115">Why let her except, before excepted.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="116">I, but you must confine your selfe within the
      <lb n="117"/>modest limits of order.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="118">Confine? Ile confine my selfe no finer then I am:
      <lb n="119"/>these cloathes are good enough to drinke in, and so bee
      <lb n="120"/>these boots too: and they be not, let them hang them­
      <lb n="121"/>selues in their owne straps.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="122">That quaffing and drinking will vndoe you: I
      <lb n="123"/>heard my Lady talke of it yesterday: and of a foolish
      <lb n="124"/>knight that you brought in one night here, to be hir woer</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="125">Who, Sir<hi rend="italic">Andrew Ague‑cheeke</hi>?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="126">I he.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="127">He's as tall a man as any's in Illyria.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="128">What's that to th'purpose?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="129">Why he ha's three thousand ducates a yeare.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <l n="130">I, but hee'l haue but a yeare in all these ducates:</l>
      <l n="131">He's a very foole, and a prodigall.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="132">Fie, that you'l say so: he playes o'th Viol‑de‑gam­
      <lb n="133"/>boys, and speaks three or four languages word for word
      <lb n="134"/>without booke, &amp; hath all the good gifts of nature.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="135">He hath indeed, almost naturall: for besides that
      <lb n="136"/>he's a foole, he's a great quarreller: and but that hee hath
      <lb n="137"/>the gift of a Coward, to allay the gust he hath in quarrel­
      <lb n="138"/>ling, 'tis thought among the prudent, he would quickely
      <lb n="139"/>haue the gift of a graue.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tob.</speaker>
      <p n="140">By this hand they are scoundrels and substra­
      <lb n="141"/>ctors that say so of him. Who are they?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="142">They that adde moreour, hee's drunke nightly
      <lb n="143"/>in your company.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="144">With drinking healths to my Neece: Ile drinke</p>
      <note type="physical" resp="#ES">The corner of this page has been torn away, and the tears slightly obscure these last lines.</note>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <p n="145">to her as long as there is a passage in my throat, &amp; drinke
      <lb n="146"/>in Illyria: he's a Coward and a Coystrill that will not
      <lb n="147"/>drinke to my Neece. till his braines turne o'th toe, like
      <lb n="148"/>a parish top. What wench?<hi rend="italic">Castiliano vulgo</hi>: for here coms
      <lb n="149"/>Sir<hi rend="italic">Andrew Agueface</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Sir Andrew.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="150">Sir<hi rend="italic">Toby Belch</hi>. How now sir<hi rend="italic">Toby Belch</hi>?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="151">Sweet sir<hi rend="italic">Andrew</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="152">Blesse you faire Shrew.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <p n="153">And you too sir.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tob.</speaker>
      <p n="154">Accost Sir<hi rend="italic">Andrew</hi>, accost.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="155">What's that?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="156">My Neeces Chamber‑maid.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="157">Good Mistris accost, I desire better acquaintance</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="158">My name is<hi rend="italic">Mary</hi>sir.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="159">Good mistris<hi rend="italic">Mary</hi>, accost.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To,</speaker>
      <p n="160">You mistake knight: Accost, is front her, boord
      <lb n="161"/>her, woe her, assayle her.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="162">By my troth I would not vndertake her in this
      <lb n="163"/>company. Is that the meaning of Accost?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="164">Far you well Gentlemen.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="165">And thou let part so Sir<hi rend="italic">Andrew</hi>, would thou
      <lb n="166"/>mightst neuer draw sword agen.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="167">And you part so mistris, I would I might neuer
      <lb n="168"/>draw sword agen: Faire Lady, doe you thinke you haue
      <lb n="169"/>fooles in hand?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="170">Sir, I haue not you by'th hand.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">An.</speaker>
      <p n="171">Marry but you shall haue, and heeres my hand.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="172">Now sir, thought is free: I pray you bring your
      <lb n="173"/>hand to'th Buttry barre, and let it drinke.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">An.</speaker>
      <p n="174">Wherefore (sweet‑heart<c rend="italic">?</c>) What's your Meta­
      <lb n="175"/>phor?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="176">It's dry sir.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="177">Why I thinke so: I am not such an asse, but I
      <lb n="178"/>can keepe my hand dry. But what's your iest?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="179">A dry iest Sir.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="180">Are you full of them?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ma.</speaker>
      <p n="181">I Sir, I haue them at my fingers ends: marry now
      <lb n="182"/>I let go your hand, I am barren.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit Maria</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="183">O knight, thou lack'st a cup of Canarie: when did
      <lb n="184"/>
         <c rend="italic">I</c>see thee so put downe?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">An.</speaker>
      <p n="185">Neuer in your life I thinke, vnlesse you see Ca­
      <lb n="186"/>narie put me downe: mee thinkes sometimes I haue no
      <lb n="187"/>more wit then a Christian, or an ordinary man ha's: but I
      <lb n="188"/>am a great eater of beefe, and I beleeue that does harme
      <lb n="189"/>to my wit.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="190">No question</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">An.</speaker>
      <p n="191">And I thought that, I'de forsweare it. Ile ride
      <lb n="192"/>home to morrow sir<hi rend="italic">Toby</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="193">
         <hi rend="italic">Pur‑quoy</hi>my deere knight?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">An.</speaker>
      <p n="194">What is<hi rend="italic">purquoy</hi>? Do, or not do? I would I had
      <lb n="195"/>bestowed that time in the tongues, that I haue in fencing
      <lb n="196"/>dancing, and beare‑bayting: O had I but followed the
      <lb n="197"/>Arts.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="198">Then hadst thou had an excellent head of haire.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">An.</speaker>
      <p n="199">Why, would that haue mended my haire?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="200">Past question, for thou seest it will not coole my
      <lb rend="turnunder" n="201"/>
         <pc rend="turnunder">(</pc>nature</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">An.</speaker>
      <p n="202">But it becoms me wel enough, dost not?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="203">Excellent, it hangs like flax on a distaffe: &amp; I hope
      <lb n="204"/>to see a huswife take thee between her legs, &amp; spin it off.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">An.</speaker>
      <p n="205">Faith Ile home to morrow sir<hi rend="italic">Toby</hi>, your niece wil
      <lb n="206"/>not be seene, or if she be it's four to one, she'l none of me:
      <lb n="207"/>the Co<c rend="inverted">u</c>nt himselfe here hard by, wooes her.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="208">Shee'l none o'th Count, she'l not match aboue hir
      <lb n="209"/>degree, neither in estate, yeares, nor wit: I haue heard her
      <lb n="210"/>swear t. Tut there's life in't man.</p>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0277-0.jpg" n="257"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="211">Ile stay a moneth longer. I am a fellow o'th
      <lb n="212"/>strangest minde i'th world: I delight in Maskes and Re­
      <lb n="213"/>uels sometimes altogether.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="214">Art thou good at these kicke‑chawses Knight<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="215">As any man in Illyria, whatsoeuer he be, vnder
      <lb n="216"/>the degree of my betters, &amp; yet I will not compare with
      <lb n="217"/>an old man.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="218">What is thy excellence in a galliard, knight?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="219">Faith, I can cut a caper.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="220">And I can cut the Mutton too't.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="221">And I thinke I haue the backe‑tricke, simply as
      <lb n="222"/>strong as any man in Illyria.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="223">Wherefore are these things hid? Wherefore haue
      <lb n="224"/>these gifts a Curtaine before 'em? Are they like to take
      <lb n="225"/>dust, like mistris<hi rend="italic">Mals</hi>picture? Why dost thou not goe
      <lb n="226"/>to Church in a Galliard, and come home in a Carranto<c rend="italic">?</c>
         
      <lb n="227"/>My verie walke should be a Iigge: I would not so much
      <lb n="228"/>as make water but in a Sinke‑a‑pace: What dooest thou
      <lb n="229"/>meane? Is it a world to hide vertues in? I did thinke by
      <lb n="230"/>the excellent constitution of thy legge, it was form'd vn­
      <lb n="231"/>der the starre of a Galliard.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="232">I, 'tis strong, and it does indifferent well in a
      <lb n="233"/>dam'd colour'd stocke. Shall we sit about some Reuels?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="234">What shall we do else: were we not borne vnder
      <lb n="235"/>Taurus?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-and">
      <speaker rend="italic">And.</speaker>
      <p n="236">Taurus? That sides and heart.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="237">No sir, it is leggs and thighes: let me see thee ca­
      <lb n="238"/>per. Ha, higher: ha, ha, excellent.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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