The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: Z3v - Comedies, p. 270

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Twelfe Night, or, What you will. That I haue done for you. Vio. I know of none, Nor know I you by voyce, or any feature:
[1805]
I hate ingratitude more in a man, Then lying, vainnesse, babling drunkennesse, Or any taint of vice, whose strong corruption Inhabites our fraile blood.
Ant. Oh heauens themselues. 2. Off.
[1810]
Come sir, I pray you go.
Ant. Let me speake a little. This youth that you see (heere, I snatch'd one halfe out of the iawes of death, Releeu'd him with such sanctitie of loue; And to his image, which me thought did promise
[1815]
Most venerable worth, did I deuotion.
1. Off. What's that to vs, the time goes by: Away. Ant. But oh, how vilde an idoll proues this God: Thou hast Sebastian done good feature, shame. In Nature, there's no blemish but the minde:
[1820]
None can be call'd deform'd, but the vnkinde. Vertue is beauty, but the beauteous euill Are empty trunkes, ore‑flourish'd by the deuill.
1. Off. The man growes mad, away with him: Come, come sir. Ant.
[1825]
Leade me on.
Exit Vio. Me thinkes his words do from such passsion flye That he beleeues himselfe, so do not I: Proue true imagination, oh proue true, That I deere brother, be now tane for you. To.
[1830]

Come hither Knight, come hither Fabian: Weel

whisper ore a couplet or two of most sage sawes.

Vio. He nam'd Sebastian: I my brother know Yet liuing in my glasse: euen such, and so In fauour was my Brother, and he went
[1835]
Still in this fashion, colour, ornament, For him I imitate: Oh if it proue, Tempests are kinde, and salt waues fresh in loue.
To.

A very dishonest paltry boy, and more a coward

then a Hare, his dishonesty appeares, in leauing his frend

[1840]

heere in necesssity, and denying him: and for his coward­

ship aske Fabian.

Fab.

A Coward, a most deuout Coward, religious in

it.

And.

Slid Ile after him againe, and beate him.

To.
[1845]

Do, cuffe him soundly, but neuer draw thy sword

And.

And I do not.

Fab.

Come, let's see the euent.

To.

I dare lay any money, twill be nothing yet.

Exit
Actus Quartus, Scæna prima. [Act 4, Scene 1] Enter Sebastian and Clowne. Clo.

Will you make me beleeue, that I am not sent for

[1850]

you?

Seb. Go too, go too, thou art a foolish fellow, Let me be cleere of thee. Clo.

Well held out yfaith: No, I do not know you,

nor I am not sent to you by my Lady, to bid you come

[1855]

speake with her: nor your name is not Master Cesario,

nor this is not my nose neyther: Nothing that is so, is so.

Seb.

I prethee vent thy folly some‑where else, thou

know'st not me.

Clo.

Vent my folly: He has heard that word of some

[1860]

great man, and now applyes it to a foole. Vent my fol­

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[full image]

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ly: I am affraid this great lubber the World will proue a

Cockney: I prethee now vngird thy strangenes, and tell

me what I shall vent to my Lady? Shall I vent to hir that

thou art comming?

Seb.
[1865]

I prethee foolish greeke depart from me, there's

money for thee, if you tarry longer, I shall giue worse

paiment.

Clo.

By my troth thou hast an open hand: these Wise‑

men that giue fooles money, get themselues a good re­

[1870]

port, after foureteene yeares purchase.

Enter Andrew, Toby, and Fabian. And.

Now sir, haue I met you again: ther's for you.

Seb. Why there's for thee, and there, and there, Are all the people mad? To.

Hold sir, or Ile throw your dagger ore the house.

Clo.
[1875]

This will I tell my Lady straight, I would not be

in some of your coats for two pence.

To.

Come on sir, hold.

An.

Nay let him alone, Ile go another way to worke

with him: Ile haue an action of Battery against him, if

[1880]

there be any law in Illyria: though I stroke him first, yet

it's no matter for that.

Seb.

Let go thy hand.

To.

Come sir, I will not let you go. Come my yong

souldier put vp your yron: you are well flesh'd: Come

[1885]

on.

Seb. I will be free from thee. What wouldst y u now? If thou dar'st tempt me further, draw thy sword. To.

What, what? Nay then I must haue an Ounce or

two of this malapert blood from you.

Enter Oliuia. Ol.
[1890]

Hold Toby, on thy life I charge thee hold.

To.

Madam.

Ol. Will it be euer thus? Vngracious wretch, Fit for the Mountaines, and the barbarous Caues, Where manners nere were preach'd: out of my sight.
[1895]
Be not offended, deere Cesario: Rudesbey be gone. I prethee gentle friend, Let thy fayre wisedome, not thy passsion sway In this vnciuill, and vniust extent Against thy peace. Go with me to my house,
[1900]
And heare thou there how many fruitlesse prankes This Ruffian hath botch'd vp, that thou thereby Mayst smile at this: Thou shalt not choose but goe: Do not denie, beshrew his soule for mee, He started one poore heart of mine, in thee.
Seb.
[1905]
What rellish is in this? How runs the streame? Or I am mad, or else this is a dreame: Let fancie still my sense in Lethe steepe, If it be thus to dreame, still let me sleepe.
Ol. Nay come I prethee, would thoud'st be rul'd by me Seb.
[1910]
Madam, I will.
Ol. O say so, and so be. Exeunt.
Scœna Secunda. [Act 4, Scene 2] Enter Maria and Clowne. Mar.

Nay, I prethee put on this gown, & this beard,

make him beleeue thou art sir Topas the Curate, doe it

quickly. Ile call sir Toby the whilst.

Clo.
[1915]

Well, Ile put it on, and I will dissemble my selfe

in't, and I would I were the first that euer dissembled in such

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Scœna Secunda. [Act 4, Scene 2] Enter Maria and Clowne. Mar.

Nay, I prethee put on this gown, & this beard,

make him beleeue thou art sir Topas the Curate, doe it

quickly. Ile call sir Toby the whilst.

Clo.
[1915]

Well, Ile put it on, and I will dissemble my selfe

in't, and I would I were the first that euer dissembled in

in such a gowne. I am not tall enough to become the

function well, nor leane enough to bee thought a good

Studient: but to be said an honest man and a good hous­

[1920]

keeper goes as fairely, as to say, a carefull man, & a great

scholler. The Competitors enter.

Enter Toby. To.

Ioue blesse thee M. Parson.

Clo.

Bonos dies sir Toby: for as the old hermit of Prage

that neuer saw pen and inke, very wittily sayd to a Neece

[1925]

of King Gorbodacke, that that is, is: so I being M. Parson,

am M. Parson; for what is that, but that? and is, but is?

To.

To him sir Topas.

Clow.

What hoa, I say, Peace in this prison.

To.

The knaue counterfets well: a good knaue.

Maluolio within. Mal.
[1930]

Who cals there?

Clo.

Sir Topas the Curate, who comes to visit Maluo­ lio the Lunaticke.

Mal.

Sir Topas, sir Topas, good sir Topas goe to my

Ladie.

Clo.
[1935]

Out hyperbolicall fiend, how vexest thou this

man? Talkest thou nothing but of Ladies ?

Tob.

Well said M. Parson.

Mal.

Sir Topas, neuer was man thus wronged, good

sir Topas do not thinke I am mad: they haue layde mee

[1940]

heere in hideous darknesse.

Clo.

Fye, thou dishonest sathan: I call thee by the

most modest termes, for I am one of those gentle ones,

that will vse the diuell himselfe with curtesie: sayst thou

that house is darke?

Mal.
[1945]

As hell sir Topas.

Clo.

Why it hath bay Windowes transparant as bari­

cadoes, and the cleere stores toward the South north, are

as lustrous as Ebony: and yet complainest thou of ob­

struction?

Mal.
[1950]

I am not mad sir Topas, I say to you this house is

darke,

Clo.

Madman thou errest: I say there is no darknesse

but ignorance, in which thou art more puzel'd then the

Ægyptians in their fogge.

Mal.
[1955]

I say this house is as darke as Ignorance, thogh

Ignorance were as darke as hell; and I say there was ne­

uer man thus abus'd, I am no more madde then you are,

make the triall of it in any constant question.

Clo.

What is the opinion of Pythagoras concerning

[1960]

Wilde‑fowle?

Mal.

That the soule of our grandam, might happily

inhabite a bird.

Clo.

What thinkst thou of his opinion ?

Mal.

I thinke nobly of the soule, and no way aproue

[1965]

his opinion.

Clo.

Fare thee well: remaine thou still in darkenesse,

thou shalt hold th' opinion of Pythagoras, ere I will allow

of thy wits, and feare to kill a Woodcocke, lest thou dis­

possesse the soule of thy grandam. Fare thee well.

Mal.
[1970]

Sir Topas, sir Topas.

Tob.

My most exquisite sir Topas.

Clo.

Nay I am for all waters.

Mar.

Thou mightst haue done this without thy berd

and gowne, he sees thee not.

To.
[1975]

To him in thine owne voyce, and bring me word

how thou findst him: I would we were well ridde of this

knauery. If he may bee conueniently deliuer'd, I would

he were, for I am now so farre in offence with my Niece,

that I cannot pursue with any safety this sport the vppe­

[1980]

shot. Come by and by to my Chamber.

Exit Clo.

Hey Robin, iolly Robin, tell me how thy Lady

does.

Mal.

Foole.

Clo.

My Lady is vnkind, perdie.

Mal.
[1985]

Foole.

Clo.

Alas why is she so?

Mal.

Foole, I say.

Clo.

She loues another. Who calles, ha?

Mal.

Good foole, as euer thou wilt deserue well at

[1990]

my hand, helpe me to a Candle, and pen, inke, and paper:

as I am a Gentleman, I will liue to bee thankefull to thee

for't.

Clo.

M. Maluolio?

Mal.

I good Foole.

Clo.
[1995]

Alas sir, how fell you besides your fiue witts?

Mall.

Foole, there was neuer man so notoriouslie a­

bus'd: I am as well in my wits (foole) as thou art.

Clo.

But as well: then you are mad indeede, if you be

no better in your wits then a foole.

Mal.
[2000]

They haue heere propertied me: keepe mee in

darkenesse, send Ministers to me, Asses, and doe all they

can to face me out of my wits.

Clo.

Aduise you what you say: the Minister is heere.

Maluolio, Maluolio, thy wittes the heauens restore: en­

[2005]

deauour thy selfe to sleepe, and leaue thy vaine bibble

babble.

Mal.

Sir Topas.

Clo.

Maintaine no words with him good fellow.

Who I sir, not I sir. God buy you good sir Topas: Mar­

[2010]

ry Amen. I will sir, I will.

Mal.

Foole, foole, foole I say.

Clo.

Alas sir be patient. What say you sir, I am shent

for speaking to you.

Mal.

Good foole, helpe me to some light, and some

[2015]

paper, I tell thee I am as well in my wittes, as any man in

Illyria.

Clo.

Well‑a‑day, that you were sir.

Mal.

By this hand I am: good foole, some inke, pa­

per, and light: and conuey what I will set downe to my

[2020]

Lady: it shall aduantage thee more, then euer the bea­

ring of Letter did.

Clo.

I will help you too't. But tel me true, are you not

mad indeed, or do you but counterfeit.

Mal.

Beleeue me I am not, I tell thee true.

Clo.
[2025]

Nay, Ile nere beleeue a madman till I see his brains

I will fetch you light, and paper, and inke.

Mal.

Foole, Ile requite it in the highest degree:

I prethee be gone.

Clo. I am gone sir, and anon sir,
[2030]
Ile be with you againe: In a trice, like to the old vice, your neede to sustaine. Who with dagger of lath, in his rage and his wrath, cries ah ha, to the diuell:
[2035]
Like a mad lad, paire thy nayles dad, Adieu good man diuell.
Exit
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="2">
   <head rend="italic center">Scœna Secunda.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 4, Scene 2]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Maria and Clowne.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <p n="1912">Nay, I prethee put on this gown, &amp; this beard,
      <lb n="1913"/>make him beleeue thou art sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>the Curate, doe it
      <lb n="1914"/>quickly. Ile call sir<hi rend="italic">Toby</hi>the whilst.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1915">Well, Ile put it on, and I will dissemble my selfe
      <lb n="1916"/>in't, and I would I were the first that euer dissembled in<pb facs="FFimg:axc0291-0.jpg" n="271"/>
         <cb n="1"/>
         
      <lb n="1917"/>in such a gowne. I am not tall enough to become the
      <lb n="1918"/>function well, nor leane enough to bee thought a good
      <lb n="1919"/>Studient: but to be said an honest man and a good hous­
      <lb n="1920"/>keeper goes as fairely, as to say, a carefull man, &amp; a great
      <lb n="1921"/>scholler. The Competitors enter.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Toby.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="1922">Ioue blesse thee M. Parson.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1923">
         <hi rend="italic">Bonos dies</hi>sir<hi rend="italic">Toby</hi>: for as the old hermit of<hi rend="italic">Prage</hi>
         
      <lb n="1924"/>that neuer saw pen and inke, very wittily sayd to a Neece
      <lb n="1925"/>of King<hi rend="italic">Gorbodacke</hi>, that that is, is: so I being M. Parson,
      <lb n="1926"/>am M. Parson; for what is that, but that? and is, but is?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="1927">To him sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clow.</speaker>
      <p n="1928">What hoa, I say, Peace in this prison.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="1929">The knaue counterfets well: a good knaue.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="business">Maluolio within.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1930">Who cals there?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1931">Sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>the Curate, who comes to visit<hi rend="italic">Maluo­
      <lb n="1932"/>lio</hi>the Lunaticke.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1933">Sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>, sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>, good sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>goe to my
      <lb n="1934"/>Ladie.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1935">Out hyperbolicall fiend, how vexest thou this
      <lb n="1936"/>man? Talkest thou nothing but of Ladies<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tob.</speaker>
      <p n="1937">Well said M. Parson.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1938">Sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>, neuer was man thus wronged, good
      <lb n="1939"/>sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>do not thinke I am mad: they haue layde mee
      <lb n="1940"/>heere in hideous darknesse.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1941">Fye, thou dishonest sathan: I call thee by the
      <lb n="1942"/>most modest termes, for I am one of those gentle ones,
      <lb n="1943"/>that will vse the diuell himselfe with curtesie: sayst thou
      <lb n="1944"/>that house is darke?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1945">As hell sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1946">Why it hath bay Windowes transparant as bari­
      <lb n="1947"/>cadoes, and the cleere stores toward the South north, are
      <lb n="1948"/>as lustrous as Ebony: and yet complainest thou of ob­
      <lb n="1949"/>struction?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1950">I am not mad sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>, I say to you this house is
      <lb n="1951"/>darke,</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1952">Madman thou errest: I say there is no darknesse
      <lb n="1953"/>but ignorance, in which thou art more puzel'd then the
      <lb n="1954"/>Ægyptians in their fogge.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1955">I say this house is as darke as Ignorance, thogh
      <lb n="1956"/>Ignorance were as darke as hell; and I say there was ne­
      <lb n="1957"/>uer man thus abus'd, I am no more madde then you are,
      <lb n="1958"/>make the triall of it in any constant question.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1959">What is the opinion of<hi rend="italic">Pythagoras</hi>concerning
      <lb n="1960"/>Wilde‑fowle?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1961">That the soule of our grandam, might happily
      <lb n="1962"/>inhabite a bird.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1963">What thinkst thou of his opinion<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1964">I thinke nobly of the soule, and no way aproue
      <lb n="1965"/>his opinion.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1966">Fare thee well: remaine thou still in darkenesse,
      <lb n="1967"/>thou shalt hold th' opinion of<hi rend="italic">Pythagoras</hi>, ere I will allow
      <lb n="1968"/>of thy wits, and feare to kill a Woodcocke, lest thou dis­
      <lb n="1969"/>possesse the soule of thy grandam. Fare thee well.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1970">Sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>, sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tob.</speaker>
      <p n="1971">My most exquisite sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1972">Nay I am for all waters.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <p n="1973">Thou mightst haue done this without thy berd
      <lb n="1974"/>and gowne, he sees thee not.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-tob">
      <speaker rend="italic">To.</speaker>
      <p n="1975">To him in thine owne voyce, and bring me word
      <lb n="1976"/>how thou findst him: I would we were well ridde of this
      <lb n="1977"/>knauery. If he may bee conueniently deliuer'd, I would
      <lb n="1978"/>he were, for I am now so farre in offence with my Niece,
      <lb n="1979"/>that I cannot pursue with any safety this sport the vppe­
      <lb n="1980"/>shot. Come by and by to my Chamber.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit</stage>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1981">Hey Robin, iolly Robin, tell me how thy Lady
      <lb n="1982"/>does.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1983">Foole.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1984">My Lady is vnkind,<hi rend="italic">perdie</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1985">Foole.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1986">Alas why is she so?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1987">Foole, I say.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1988">She loues another. Who calles, ha?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1989">Good foole, as euer thou wilt deserue well at
      <lb n="1990"/>my hand, helpe me to a Candle, and pen, inke, and paper:
      <lb n="1991"/>as I am a Gentleman, I will liue to bee thankefull to thee
      <lb n="1992"/>for't.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1993">M.<hi rend="italic">Maluolio</hi>?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="1994">I good Foole.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1995">Alas sir, how fell you besides your fiue witts?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mall.</speaker>
      <p n="1996">Foole, there was neuer man so notoriouslie a­
      <lb n="1997"/>bus'd: I am as well in my wits (foole) as thou art.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1998">But as well: then you are mad indeede, if you be
      <lb n="1999"/>no better in your wits then a foole.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="2000">They haue heere propertied me: keepe mee in
      <lb n="2001"/>darkenesse, send Ministers to me, Asses, and doe all they
      <lb n="2002"/>can to face me out of my wits.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="2003">Aduise you what you say: the Minister is heere.</p>
      <p n="2004">
         <hi rend="italic">Maluolio, Maluolio</hi>, thy wittes the heauens restore: en­
      <lb n="2005"/>deauour thy selfe to sleepe, and leaue thy vaine bibble
      <lb n="2006"/>babble.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="2007">Sir<hi rend="italic">Topas</hi>.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="2008">Maintaine no words with him good fellow.
      <lb n="2009"/>Who I sir, not I sir. God buy you good sir Topas: Mar­
      <lb n="2010"/>ry Amen. I will sir, I will.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="2011">Foole, foole, foole I say.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="2012">Alas sir be patient. What say you sir, I am shent
      <lb n="2013"/>for speaking to you.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="2014">Good foole, helpe me to some light, and some
      <lb n="2015"/>paper, I tell thee I am as well in my wittes, as any man in
      <lb n="2016"/>Illyria.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="2017">Well‑a‑day, that you were sir.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="2018">By this hand I am: good foole, some inke, pa­
      <lb n="2019"/>per, and light: and conuey what I will set downe to my
      <lb n="2020"/>Lady: it shall aduantage thee more, then euer the bea­
      <lb n="2021"/>ring of Letter did.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="2022">I will help you too't. But tel me true, are you not
      <lb n="2023"/>mad indeed, or do you but counterfeit.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="2024">Beleeue me I am not, I tell thee true.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="2025">Nay, Ile nere beleeue a madman till I see his brains
      <lb n="2026"/>I will fetch you light, and paper, and inke.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-mal">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mal.</speaker>
      <p n="2027">Foole, Ile requite it in the highest degree:
      <lb n="2028"/>I prethee be gone.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tn-fes">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <l n="2029">I am gone sir, and anon sir,</l>
      <l n="2030">Ile be with you againe:</l>
      <l n="2031">In a trice, like to the old vice,</l>
      <l n="2032">your neede to sustaine.</l>
      <l n="2033">Who with dagger of lath, in his rage and his wrath,</l>
      <l n="2034">cries ah ha, to the diuell:</l>
      <l n="2035">Like a mad lad, paire thy nayles dad,</l>
      <l n="2036">Adieu good man diuell.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit</stage>
</div>

        
        

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