The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: 2¶2v - Tragedies, p. [16]

Left Column


Troylus and Cressida. Cres.

Good Vnckle beseech you, on my knees, I be­

[2280]

seech you what's the matter?

Pan.

Thou must be gone wench, thou must be gone;

thou art chang'd for Anthenor: thou must to thy Father,

and be gone from Troylus: 'twill be his death: 'twill be

his baine, he cannot beare it.

Cres.
[2285]

O you immortall gods! I will not goe.

Pan.

Thou must.

Cres. I will not Vnckle: I haue forgot my Father: I know no touch of consanguinitie: No kin, no loue, no bloud, no soule, so neere me,
[2290]
As the sweet Troylus: O you gods diuine! Make Cressids name the very crowne of falsehood! If euer she leaue Troylus: time, orce and death, Do to this body what extremitie you can; But the strong base and building of my loue,
[2295]
Is as the very Center of the earth, Drawing all things to it. I will goe in and weepe.
Pan.

Doe, doe.

Cres. Teare my bright heire, and scratch my praised cheekes, Cracke my cleere voyce with sobs, and breake my heart
[2300]
With sounding Troylus. I will not goe from Troy.
Exeunt.
[Act 4, Scene 3] Enter Paris, Troylus, Æneas, Deiphebus, An­ thenor and Diomedes. Par. It is great morning, and the houre prefixt Of her deliuerie to this valiant Greeke Comes fast vpon: good my brother Troylus, Tell you the Lady what she is to doe,
[2305]
And hast her to the purpose.
Troy. Walke into her house: Ile bring her to the Grecian presently; And to his hand, when I deliuer her, Thinke it an Altar, and thy brother Troylus
[2310]
A Priest, there offring to it his heart.
Par. I know what 'tis to loue, And would, as I shall pittie, I could helpe. Please you walke in, my Lords. Exeunt.
[Act 4, Scene 4] Enter Pandarus and Cressid. Pan.

Be moderate, be moderate.

Cres.
[2315]
Why tell you me of moderation? The griefe is fine, full perfect that I taste, And no lesse in a sense as strong As that which causeth it. How can I moderate it? If I could temporise with my affection,
[2320]
Or brew it to a weake arid colder pallat, The like alaiment could I giue my griefe: My loue admits no qualifying crosse; Enter Troylus. No more my griefe, in such a precious losse.
Pan.

Here, here, here, he comes, a sweet ducke.

Cres.
[2325]

O Troylus, Troylus!

Pan.

What a paire of spectacles is here? let me em­

brace too: oh hart, as the goodly saying is; O heart, hea­

uie heart, why sighest thou without breaking? where he

answers againe; because thou canst not ease thy smart by

[2330]

friendship, nor by speaking: there was neuer a truer rime;

let vs cast away nothing, for we may liue to haue neede

of such a Verse: We see it, we see it: how now Lambs?

Troy. Cressid: I loue thee in so strange a puritie; That the blest gods, as angry with my fancie,
[2335]
More bright in zeale, then the deuotion which Cold lips blow to their Deities: take thee from me.
Cres.

Haue the gods enuie?

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Right Column


Pan.

I, I, I, I, 'tis too plaine a case.

Cres. And is it true, that I must goe; from Troy? Troy.
[2340]

A hatefull truth.

Cres.

What, and from Troylus too?

Troy.

From Troy, and Troylus.

Cres.

Ist possible?

Troy. And sodainely, where iniurie of chance
[2345]
Puts backe leaue‑taking, iustles roughly by All time of pause; rudely beguiles our lips Of all reioyndure: forcibly preuents Our lockt embrasures; strangles our deare vowes, Euen in the birth of our owne laboring breath.
[2350]
We two, that with so many thousand sighes Did buy each other, must poorely sell our selues, With the rude breuitie and discharge of our Iniurious time; now with a robbers haste Crams his rich theeuerie vp, he knowes not how.
[2355]
As many farwels as be stars in heauen, With distinct breath, and consign'd kisses to them, He fumbles vp into a loose adiew; And scants vs with a single famisht kisse, Distasting with the salt of broken teares.
Enter Æneas. Æneas. within.
[2360]

My Lord, is the Lady ready?

Troy. Harke, you are call'd: some say the genius so Cries, come to him that instantly must dye. Bid them haue patience: she shall come anon. Pan.

Where are my teares? raine, to lay this winde,

[2365]

or my heart will be blowne vp by the root.

Cres.

I must then to the Grecians?

Troy.

No remedy.

Cres.

A wofull Cressid mong'st the merry Greekes.

Conventionally this speech is given to Cressida. Troy.

When shall we see againe?

Troy.
[2370]
Here me my loue: be thou but true of heart.
Cres. I true? how now? what wicked deeme is this? Troy. Nay, we must vse expostulation kindely, For it is parting from vs: I speake not, be thou true, as fearing thee:
[2375]
For I will throw my Gloue to death himselfe, That there's no maculation in thy heart: But be thou true, say I, to fashion in My sequent protestation: be thou true, And I will see thee.
Cres.
[2380]
O you shall be expos'd, my Lord to dangers As infinite, as imminent: but Ile be true.
Troy. And Ile grow friend with danger; Weare this Sleeue. Cres. And you this Gloue.
[2385]
When shall I see you?
Troy. I will corrupt the Grecian Centinels, To giue thee nightly visitation. But yet be true. Cres.

O heauens: be true againe?

Troy.
[2390]
Heare why I speake it; Loue: The Grecian youths are full of qualitie, Their louing well compos'd, with guist of nature, Flawing and swelling ore with Arts and exercise: How nouelties may moue, and parts with person.
[2395]
Alas, a kinde of godly iealousie; Which I beseech you call a vertuous sinne: Makes me affraid.
Cres.

O heauens, you loue me not!

Troy. Dye I a villaine then:
[2400]
In this I doe not call your faith in question So mainely as my merit: I cannot sing, Nor heele the high Lauolt; nor sweeten talke; Nor play at subtill games; faire vertues all; To

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[Act 4, Scene 3] Enter Paris, Troylus, Æneas, Deiphebus, An­ thenor and Diomedes. Par. It is great morning, and the houre prefixt Of her deliuerie to this valiant Greeke Comes fast vpon: good my brother Troylus, Tell you the Lady what she is to doe,
[2305]
And hast her to the purpose.
Troy. Walke into her house: Ile bring her to the Grecian presently; And to his hand, when I deliuer her, Thinke it an Altar, and thy brother Troylus
[2310]
A Priest, there offring to it his heart.
Par. I know what 'tis to loue, And would, as I shall pittie, I could helpe. Please you walke in, my Lords. Exeunt.
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="3" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 4, Scene 3]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Paris, Troylus, Æneas, Deiphebus, An­
      <lb/>thenor and Diomedes.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tro-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2301">It is great morning, and the houre prefixt</l>
      <l n="2302">Of her deliuerie to this valiant Greeke</l>
      <l n="2303">Comes fast vpon: good my brother<hi rend="italic">Troylus</hi>,</l>
      <l n="2304">Tell you the Lady what she is to doe,</l>
      <l n="2305">And hast her to the purpose.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tro-tro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Troy.</speaker>
      <l n="2306">Walke into her house:</l>
      <l n="2307">Ile bring her to the Grecian presently;</l>
      <l n="2308">And to his hand, when I deliuer her,</l>
      <l n="2309">Thinke it an Altar, and thy brother<hi rend="italic">Troylus</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="2310">A Priest, there offring to it his heart.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tro-par">
      <speaker rend="italic">Par.</speaker>
      <l n="2311">I know what 'tis to loue,</l>
      <l n="2312">And would, as I shall pittie, I could helpe.</l>
      <l n="2313">Please you walke in, my Lords.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic inline" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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