The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: 2¶6r - Tragedies, p. [23]

Left Column


Troylus and Cressida. Fall all together. Priam. Come Hector, come, goe backe: Thy wife hath dreampt: thy mother hath had visions; Cassandra doth foresee; and 1 my selfe,
[3175]
Am like a Prophet suddenly enrapt, to tell thee that this day is ominous: Therefore come backe.
Hect. Æneas is a field, And I do stand engag'd to many Greekes,
[3180]
Euen in the faith of valour, to appeare This morning to them.
Priam.

I, but thou shalt not goe,

Hect. I must not breake my faith: You know me dutifull, therefore deare sir,
[3185]
Let me not shame respect; but giue me leaue To take that course by your consent and voice, Which you doe here forbid me, Royall Priam.
Cass.

O Priam, yeeld not to him.

And.

Doe not deere father.

Hect.
[3190]
Andromache I am offended with you: Vpon the loue you beare me, get you in.
Exit Andromache Troy. This foolish, dreaming, superstitious girle, Makes all these bodements. Cass. O farewell, deere Hector:
[3195]
Looke how thou diest; looke how thy eye turnes pale: Looke how thy wounds doth bleede at many vents: Harke how Troy roares; how Hecuba cries out; How poore Andromache shrils her dolour forth; Behold distraction, frenzie, and amazement,
[3200]
Like witlesse Antickes one another meete, And all cry Hector, Hectors dead: O Hector!
Troy.

Away, away.

Cas. Farewell: yes, soft: Hector I take my leaue; Thou do'st thy selfe, and all our Troy deceiue. Exit. Hect.
[3205]
You are amaz'd, my Liege, at her exclaime: Goe in and cheere the Towne, weele forth and fight: Doe deedes of praise, and tell you them at night.
Priam.

Farewell: the gods with safetie stand about

thee.

Alarum. Troy.
[3210]
They are at it, harke: proud Diomed, beleeue I come to loose my arme, or winne my sleeue.
Enter Pandar. Pand.

Doe you heare my Lord? do you heare?

Troy.

What now?

Pand.

Here's a Letter come from yond poore girle.

Troy.
[3215]

Let me reade.

Pand.

A whorson tisicke, a whorson rascally tisicke,

so troubles me; and the foolish fortune of this girle, and

what one thing, what another, that I shall leaue you one

o'th's dayes: and I haue a rheume in mine eyes too; and

[3220]

such an ache in my bones; that vnlesse a man were curst,

I cannot tell what to thinke on't. What sayes shee

there?

Troy. Words, words, meere words, no matter from the heart; Th'effect doth operate another way.
[3225]
Goe winde to winde, there turne and change together: My loue with words and errors still she feedes; But edifies another with her deedes.
Pand.

Why, but heare you?

Troy. Hence brother lackie; ignomie and shame
[3230]
Pursue thy life, and liue aye with thy name.
A Larum Alarum . Exeunt.

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Right Column


[Act 5, Scene 4] Enter Thersites in excursion. Ther.

Now they are clapper‑clawing one another, Ile

goe looke on: that dissembling abhominable varlet. Dio­ mede , has got that same scuruie, doting, foolish yong

knaues Sleeue of Troy, there in his Helme: I would faine

[3235]

see them meet; that, that same yong Troian asse, that loues

the whore there, might send that Greekish whore‑mai­

sterly villaine, with the Sleeue, backe to the dissembling

luxurious drabbe, of a sleeuelesse errant. O'th'tother side,

the pollicie of those craftie swearing rascals; that stole

[3240]

old Mouse‑eaten dry cheese, Nestor: and that same dog‑

foxe Vlisses is not prou'd worth a Black‑berry. They set

me vp in pollicy, that mungrill curre Aiax against that

dogge of as bad a kinde, Achilles. And now is the curre

Aiax prouder then the curre Achilles, and will not arme

[3245]

to day. Whereupon, the Grecians began to proclaime

barbarisme; and pollicie growes into an ill opinion.

Enter Diomed and Troylus.

Soft, here comes Sleeue, and th'other.

Troy. Flye not: for should'st thou take the Riuer Stix,
[3250]
I would swim after.
Diom. Thou do'st miscall retire: I doe not flye; but aduantagious care Withdrew me from the oddes of multitude: Haue at thee? Ther.
[3255]
Hold thy whore Grecian: now for thy whore Troian: Now the Sleeue, now the Sleeue.
Enter Hector. Hect. What art thou Greek? art thou for Hectors match? Art thou of bloud, and honour? Ther.

No, no: I am a rascall: a scuruie railing knaue:

[3260]

a very filthy roague.

Hect.

I doe beleeue thee, liue.

Ther.

God a mercy, that thou wilt beleeue me; but a

plague breake thy necke———for frighting me: what's be­

come of the wenching rogues? I thinke they haue

[3265]

swallowed one anoth er. I would laugh at that mira­

cle————yet in a fort, lecherie eates it selfe; Ile seeke them.

Exit.
[Act 5, Scene 5] Enter Diomed and Seruants. Dio. Goe, goe, my seruant, take thou Troylus Horse; Present the faire steede to my Lady Cressid: Fellow, commend my seruice to her beauty;
[3270]
Tell her, I haue chastis'd the amorous Troyan. And am her Knight by proofe.
Ser.

I goe my Lord.

Enter Agamemnon. Aga. Renew, renew, the fierce Polidamus Hath beate downe Menon: bastard Margarelon
[3275]
Hath Doreus prisoner. And stands Calossus‑wife wauing his beame, Vpon the pashed courses of the Kings: Epistropus and Cedus, Polixines is slaine; Amphimacusand Thous deadly hurt;
[3280]
Patroclus tane or slaine, and Palamedes Sore hurt and bruised; the dreadfull Sagittary Appauls our numbers, haste we Diomed To re‑enforcement, or we perish all.
Enter Nestor. Nest. Coe Goe beare Patroclus body to Achilles,
[3285]
And bid the snaile‑pac'd Aiax arme for shame: There is a thousand Hectors in the field: Now here he fights on Galathe his Horse, And there lacks worke: anon he's there a foote, And there they flye or dye, like scaled sculs, Before

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[Act 5, Scene 4] Enter Thersites in excursion. Ther.

Now they are clapper‑clawing one another, Ile

goe looke on: that dissembling abhominable varlet. Dio­ mede , has got that same scuruie, doting, foolish yong

knaues Sleeue of Troy, there in his Helme: I would faine

[3235]

see them meet; that, that same yong Troian asse, that loues

the whore there, might send that Greekish whore‑mai­

sterly villaine, with the Sleeue, backe to the dissembling

luxurious drabbe, of a sleeuelesse errant. O'th'tother side,

the pollicie of those craftie swearing rascals; that stole

[3240]

old Mouse‑eaten dry cheese, Nestor: and that same dog‑

foxe Vlisses is not prou'd worth a Black‑berry. They set

me vp in pollicy, that mungrill curre Aiax against that

dogge of as bad a kinde, Achilles. And now is the curre

Aiax prouder then the curre Achilles, and will not arme

[3245]

to day. Whereupon, the Grecians began to proclaime

barbarisme; and pollicie growes into an ill opinion.

Enter Diomed and Troylus.

Soft, here comes Sleeue, and th'other.

Troy. Flye not: for should'st thou take the Riuer Stix,
[3250]
I would swim after.
Diom. Thou do'st miscall retire: I doe not flye; but aduantagious care Withdrew me from the oddes of multitude: Haue at thee? Ther.
[3255]
Hold thy whore Grecian: now for thy whore Troian: Now the Sleeue, now the Sleeue.
Enter Hector. Hect. What art thou Greek? art thou for Hectors match? Art thou of bloud, and honour? Ther.

No, no: I am a rascall: a scuruie railing knaue:

[3260]

a very filthy roague.

Hect.

I doe beleeue thee, liue.

Ther.

God a mercy, that thou wilt beleeue me; but a

plague breake thy necke———for frighting me: what's be­

come of the wenching rogues? I thinke they haue

[3265]

swallowed one anoth er. I would laugh at that mira­

cle————yet in a fort, lecherie eates it selfe; Ile seeke them.

Exit.
 

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<div type="scene" n="4" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 5, Scene 4]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Thersites in excursion.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tro-the">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ther.</speaker>
      <p n="3231">Now they are clapper‑clawing one another, Ile
      <lb n="3232"/>goe looke on: that dissembling abhominable varlet.<hi rend="italic">Dio­
      <lb n="3233"/>mede</hi>, has got that same scuruie, doting, foolish yong
      <lb n="3234"/>knaues Sleeue of Troy, there in his Helme: I would faine
      <lb n="3235"/>see them meet; that, that same yong Troian asse, that loues
      <lb n="3236"/>the whore there, might send that Greekish whore‑mai­
      <lb n="3237"/>sterly villaine, with the Sleeue, backe to the dissembling
      <lb n="3238"/>luxurious drabbe, of a sleeuelesse errant. O'th'tother side,
      <lb n="3239"/>the pollicie of those craftie swearing rascals; that stole
      <lb n="3240"/>old Mouse‑eaten dry cheese,<hi rend="italic">Nestor</hi>: and that same dog‑
      <lb n="3241"/>foxe<hi rend="italic">Vlisses</hi>is not prou'd worth a Black‑berry. They set
      <lb n="3242"/>me vp in pollicy, that mungrill curre<hi rend="italic">Aiax</hi>against that
      <lb n="3243"/>dogge of as bad a kinde,<hi rend="italic">Achilles</hi>. And now is the curre
      <lb n="3244"/>
         <hi rend="italic">Aiax</hi>prouder then the curre<hi rend="italic">Achilles</hi>, and will not arme
      <lb n="3245"/>to day. Whereupon, the Grecians began to proclaime
      <lb n="3246"/>barbarisme; and pollicie growes into an ill opinion.
      <lb n="3247"/>
         <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Diomed and Troylus.</stage>
         
      <lb n="3248"/>Soft, here comes Sleeue, and th'other.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tro-tro">
      <speaker rend="italic">Troy.</speaker>
      <l n="3249">Flye not: for should'st thou take the Riuer Stix,</l>
      <l n="3250">I would swim after.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tro-dio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Diom.</speaker>
      <l n="3251">Thou do'st miscall retire:</l>
      <l n="3252">I doe not flye; but aduantagious care</l>
      <l n="3253">Withdrew me from the oddes of multitude:</l>
      <l n="3254">Haue at thee?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tro-the">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ther.</speaker>
      <l n="3255">Hold thy whore Grecian: now for thy whore</l>
      <l n="3256">Troian: Now the Sleeue, now the Sleeue.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Hector.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tro-hec">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hect.</speaker>
      <l n="3257">What art thou Greek? art thou for<hi rend="italic">Hectors</hi>match?</l>
      <l n="3258">Art thou of bloud, and honour?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tro-the">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ther.</speaker>
      <p n="3259">No, no: I am a rascall: a scuruie railing knaue:
      <lb n="3260"/>a very filthy roague.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tro-hec">
      <speaker rend="italic">Hect.</speaker>
      <p n="3261">I doe beleeue thee, liue.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tro-the">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ther.</speaker>
      <p n="3262">God a mercy, that thou wilt beleeue me; but a
      <lb n="3263"/>plague breake thy necke———for frighting me: what's be­
      <lb n="3264"/>come of the wenching rogues? I thinke they haue
      <lb n="3265"/>swallowed one anoth<c rend="inverted">e</c>r. I would laugh at that mira­
      <lb n="3266"/>cle————yet in a fort, lecherie eates it selfe; Ile seeke them.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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