The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: D3r - Comedies, p. 41

Left Column


The Merry Wiues of Windsor. Eu.

It is a fery discretion‑answere; saue the fall is in

the 'ord, dissolutely: the ort is (according to our mea­

[230]

ning) resolutely: his meaning is good.

Sh. I: I thinke my Cosen meant well. Sl. I, or else I would I might be hang'd (la.) Sh.

Here comes faire Mistris Anne; would I were

yong for your sake, Mistris Anne.

An.
[235]

The dinner is on the Table, my Father desires

your worships company.

Sh. I will wait on him, (faire Mistris Anne.) Eu. Od's plessed‑wil: I wil not be absēce absence at the grace. An. Wil't please your worship to come in, Sir? Sl.
[240]
No, I thank you forsooth, hartely; I am very well.
An. The dinner attends you, Sir. Sl.

I am not a‑hungry, I thanke you, forsooth: goe,

Sirha, for all you are my man, goe wait vpon my Cosen

Shallow: a Iustice of peace sometime may be beholding

[245]

to his friend, for a Man; I keepe but three Men, and a

Boy yet, till my Mother be dead: but what though, yet

I liue like a poore Gentleman borne.

An.

I may not goe in without your worship: they

will not sit till you come.

Sl.
[250]

I'faith, ile eate nothing: I thanke you as much as

though I did.

An. I pray you Sir walke in. Sl.

I had rather walke here (I thanke you) I bruiz'd

my shin th' other day, with playing at Sword and Dag­

[255]

ger with a Master of Fence (three veneys for a dish of

stew'd Prunes) and by my troth, I cannot abide the smell

of hot meate since. Why doe your dogs barke so? be

there Beares ith' Towne?

An. I thinke there are, Sir, I heard them talk'd of. Sl.
[260]

I loue the sport well, but I shall as soone quarrell

at it, as any man in England: you are afraid if you see the

Beare loose, are you not?

An. I indeede Sir. Sl.

That's meate and drinke to me now: I haue seene

[265]

Saskerson loose, twenty times, and haue taken him by the

Chaine: but (I warrant you) the women haue so cride

and shrekt at it, that it past: But women indeede, cannot

abide 'em, they are very ill‑fauour'd rough things.

Ma.Pa Come, gentle M. Slender, come; we stay for you. Sl.
[270]
Ile eate nothing, I thanke you Sir.
Ma.Pa By cocke and pie, you shall not choose, Sir: come, come. Sl. Nay, pray you lead the way. Ma.Pa. Come on, Sir. Sl. Mistris Anne: your selfe shall goe first. An.
[275]
Not I Sir, pray you keepe on.
Sl. Truely I will not goe first: truly‑la: I will not doe you that wrong. An. I pray you Sir. Sl.

Ile rather be vnmannerly, then troublesome: you

doe your selfe wrong indeede‑la.

Scena Secunda. [Act 1, Scene 2] Enter Euans, and Simple. Eu.
[280]

Go your waies, and aske of Doctor Caius house,

which is the way; and there dwels one Mistris Quickly;

which is in the manner of his Nurse; or his dry‑Nurse; or

his Cooke; or his Laundry; his Washer, and his Ringer.

Si. Well Sir.

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Right Column


Eu.
[285]

Nay, it is petter yet: giue her this letter; for it is

a 'oman that altogeathers acquaintāce acquaintance with Mistris Anne Page ; and the Letter is to desire, and require her to soli­

cite your Masters desires, to Mistris Anne Page: I pray

you be gon: I will make an end of my dinner; ther's Pip­

[290]

pins and Cheese to come.

Exeunt.
Scena Tertia. [Act 1, Scene 3] Enter Falstaffe, Host, Bardolfe, Nym, Pistoll, Page. Fal.

Mine Host of the Garter?

Ho.

What saies my Bully Rooke? speake schollerly,

and wisely.

Fal.

Truely mine Host; I must turne away some of my

[295]

followers.

Ho.

Discard, (bully Hercules) casheere; let them wag;

trot, trot.

Fal.

I sit at ten pounds a weeke.

Ho.

Thou'rt an Emperor ( Cesar, Keiser and Pheazar)

[300]

I will entertaine Bardolfe: he shall draw; he shall tap; said

I well (bully Hector?)

Fa. Doe so (good mine Host. Ho.

I haue spoke; let him follow: let me see thee froth,

and liue: I am at a word: follow.

Fal.
[305]

Bardolfe, follow him: a Tapster is a good trade:

an old Cloake, makes a new Ierkin: a wither'd Seruing­

man, a fresh Tapster: goe, adew.

Ba.

It is a life that I haue desir'd: I will thriue.

Pist. O base hungarian wight: wilt y u the spigot wield. Ni.
[310]
He was gotten in drink: is not the humor cōceited conceited ?
Fal.

I am glad I am so acquit of this Tinderbox: his

Thefts were too open: his filching was like an vnskilfull

Singer, he kept not time.

Ni.

The good humor is to steale at a minutes rest.

Pist.
[315]

Conuay: the wise it call: Steale? foh: a fico for

the phrase.

Fal. Well sirs, I am almost out at heeles. Pist. Why then let Kibes ensue. Fal. There is no remedy: I must conicatch, I must shift. Pist.
[320]
Yong Rauens must haue foode.
Fal. Which of you know Ford of this Towne? Pist. I ken the wight: he is of substance good. Fal. My honest Lads, I will tell you what I am about. Pist. Two yards, and more. Fal.
[325]

No quips now Pistoll: (Indeede I am in the waste

two yards about: but I am now about no waste: I am a­

bout thrift) briefely: I doe meane to make loue to Fords

wife: I spie entertainment in her: shee discourses: shee

carues: she giues the leere of inuitation: I can construe

[330]

the action of her familier stile, & the hardest voice of her

behauior (to be english'd rightly) is, I am Sir Iohn Falstafs .

Pist.

He hath studied her will; and translated her will:

out of honesty, into English.

Ni.

The Anchor is deepe: will that humor passe?

Fal.
[335]

Now, the report goes, she has all the rule of her

husbands Purse: he hath a legend of Angels.

Pist.

As many diuels entertaine: and to her Boy say I.

Ni.

The humor rises: it is good: humor me the angels.

Fal.

I haue writ me here a letter to her: & here ano­

[340]

ther to Pages wife, who euen now gaue mee good eyes

too; examind my parts with most iudicious illiads: some­

times the beame of her view, guilded my foote: some­

times my portly belly.

D3 Pist.

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Scena Secunda. [Act 1, Scene 2] Enter Euans, and Simple. Eu.
[280]

Go your waies, and aske of Doctor Caius house,

which is the way; and there dwels one Mistris Quickly;

which is in the manner of his Nurse; or his dry‑Nurse; or

his Cooke; or his Laundry; his Washer, and his Ringer.

Si. Well Sir. Eu.
[285]

Nay, it is petter yet: giue her this letter; for it is

a 'oman that altogeathers acquaintāceacquaintance with Mistris Anne Page ; and the Letter is to desire, and require her to soli­

cite your Masters desires, to Mistris Anne Page: I pray

you be gon: I will make an end of my dinner; ther's Pip­

[290]

pins and Cheese to come.

Exeunt.
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="2">
   <head rend="italic center">Scena Secunda.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 1, Scene 2]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Euans, and Simple.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-wiv-eva">
      <speaker rend="italic">Eu.</speaker>
      <p n="280">Go your waies, and aske of Doctor<hi rend="italic">Caius</hi>house,
      <lb n="281"/>which is the way; and there dwels one Mistris<hi rend="italic">Quickly</hi>;
      <lb n="282"/>which is in the manner of his Nurse; or his dry‑Nurse; or
      <lb n="283"/>his Cooke; or his Laundry; his Washer, and his Ringer.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wiv-sim">
      <speaker rend="italic">Si.</speaker>
      <l n="284">Well Sir.</l>
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   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-wiv-eva">
      <speaker rend="italic">Eu.</speaker>
      <p n="285">Nay, it is petter yet: giue her this letter; for it is
      <lb n="286"/>a 'oman that altogeathers<choice>
            <abbr>acquaintāce</abbr>
            <expan>acquaintance</expan>
         </choice>with Mistris<hi rend="italic">Anne
      <lb n="287"/>Page</hi>; and the Letter is to desire, and require her to soli­
      <lb n="288"/>cite your Masters desires, to Mistris<hi rend="italic">Anne Page</hi>: I pray
      <lb n="289"/>you be gon: I will make an end of my dinner; ther's Pip­
      <lb n="290"/>pins and Cheese to come.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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