The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: 2C1r - Comedies, p. 301

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The Winters Tale.

Our King being ready to leape out of himselfe, for ioy of

his found Daughter; as if that Ioy were now become a

Losse, cryes, Oh, thy Mother, thy Mother: then askes

[3015]

Bohemia forgiuenesse, then embraces his Sonne‑in‑Law:

then againe worryes he his Daughter, with clipping her.

Now he thanks the old Shepheard (which stands by, like

a Weather‑bitten Conduit, of many Kings Reignes.) I

neuer heard of such another Encounter; which lames Re­

[3020]

port to follow it, and vndo’s description to doe it.

Gent. 2.

What, 'pray you, became of Antigonus, that

carryed hence the Child?

Gent. 3.

Like an old Tale still, which will haue matter

to rehearse, though Credit be asleepe, and not an eare o­

[3025]

pen; he was torne to pieces with a Beare: This auouches

the Shepheards Sonne; who ha’s not onely his Innocence

(which seemes much) to iustifie him, but a Hand‑kerchief

and Rings of his, that Paulina knows.

Gent. 1.

What became of his Barke, and his Fol­

[3030]

lowers?

Gent. 3.

Wrackt the same instant of their Masters

death, and in the view of the Shepheard: so that all the

Instruments which ayded to expose the Child, were euen

then lost, when it was found. But oh the Noble Combat,

[3035]

that 'twixt Ioy and Sorrow was fought in Paulina. Shee

had one Eye declin’d for the losse of her Husband, ano­

ther eleuated, that the Oracle was fulfill’d: Shee lifted the

Princesse from the Earth, and so locks her in embracing,

as if shee would pin her to her heart, that shee might no

[3040]

more be in danger of loosing.

Gent. 1.

The Dignitie of this Act was worth the au­

dience of Kings and Princes, for by such was it acted.

Gent. 3.

One of the prettyest touches of all, and that

which angl’d for mine Eyes (caught the Water, though

[3045]

not the Fish) was, when at the Relation of the Queenes

death (with the manner how shee came to’t, brauely con­

fess’d, and lamented by the King) how attentiuenesse

wounded his Daughter, till (from one signe of dolour to

another) shee did (with an Alas) I would faine say, bleed

[3050]

Teares; for I am sure, my heart wept blood. Who was

most Marble, there changed colour: some swownded, all

sorrowed: if all the World could haue seen’t, the Woe

had beene vniuersall.

Gent. 1.

Are they returned to the Court?

Gent. 3.
[3055]

No: The Princesse hearing of her Mothers

Statue (which is in the keeping of Paulina) a Peece many

yeeres in doing, and now newly perform’d, by that rare

Italian Master, Iulio Romano, who (had he himselfe Eter­

nitie, and could put Breath into his Worke) would be­

[3060]

guile Nature of her Custome, so perfectly he is her Ape:

He so neere to Hermione, hath done Hermione, that they

say one would speake to her, and stand in hope of answer.

Thither (with all greedinesse of affection) are they gone,

and there they intend to Sup.

Gent. 2.
[3065]

I thought she had some great matter there in

hand, for shee hath priuately, twice or thrice a day, euer

since the death of Hermione, visited that remoued House.

Shall wee thither, and with our companie peece the Re­

ioycing?

Gent. 1.
[3070]

Who would be thence, that ha’s the benefit

of Accesse? euery winke of an Eye, some new Grace

will be borne: our Absence makes vs vnthriftie to our

Knowledge. Let’s along.

Exit. Aut.

Now (had I not the dash of my former life in

[3075]

me) would Preferment drop on my head. I brought the

old man and his Sonne aboord the Prince; told him, I

heard them talke of a Farthell, and I know not what: but

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he at that time ouer‑fond of the Shepheards Daughter (so

he then tooke her to be) who began to be much Sea‑sick,

[3080]

and himselfe little better, extremitie of Weather conti­

nuing, this Mysterie remained vndiscouer’d. But 'tis all

one to me: for had I beene the finder‑out of this Secret,

it would not haue rellish’d among my other discredits.

Enter Shepheard and Clowne.

Here come those I haue done good to against my will,

[3085]

and alreadie appearing in the blossomes of their For­

tune.

Shep.

Come Boy, I am past moe Children: but thy

Sonnes and Daughters will be all Gentlemen borne.

Clow.

You are well met (Sir:) you deny’d to fight

[3090]

with mee this other day, because I was no Gentleman

borne. See you these Clothes? say you see them not,

and thinke me still no Gentleman borne: You were best

say these Robes are not Gentlemen borne. Giue me the

Lye: doe: and try whether I am not now a Gentleman

[3095]

borne.

Aut.

I know you are now (Sir) a Gentleman borne.

Clow.

I, and haue been so any time these foure hours.

Shep.

And so haue I, Boy.

Clow.

So you haue: but I was a Gentleman borne be­

[3100]

fore my Father: for the Kings Sonne tooke me by the

hand, and call’d mee Brother: and then the two Kings

call’d my Father Brother: and then the Prince (my Bro­

ther) and the Princesse (my Sister) call’d my Father, Father;

and so wee wept: and there was the first Gentleman‑like

[3105]

teares that euer we shed.

Shep.

We may liue (Sonne) to shed many more.

Clow.

I: or else 'twere hard luck, being in so preposte­

rous estate as we are.

Aut.

I humbly beseech you (Sir) to pardon me all the

[3110]

faults I haue committed to your Worship, and to giue

me your good report to the Prince my Master.

Shep.

'Prethee Sonne doe: for we must be gentle, now

we are Gentlemen.

Clow.

Thou wilt amend thy life?

Aut.
[3115]

I, and it like your good Worship.

Clow.

Giue me thy hand: I will sweare to the Prince,

thou art as honest a true Fellow as any is in Bohemia.

Shep.

You may say it, but not sweare it.

Clow.

Not sweare it, now I am a Gentleman? Let

[3120]

Boores and Francklins say it, Ile sweare it.

Shep.

How if it be false (Sonne?)

Clow.

If it be ne’re so false, a true Gentleman may

sweare it, in the behalfe of his Friend: And Ile sweare to

the Prince, thou art a tall Fellow of thy hands, and that

[3125]

thou wilt not be drunke: but I know thou art no tall Fel­

low of thy hands, and that thou wilt be drunke: but Ile

sweare it, and I would thou would’st be a tall Fellow of

thy hands.

Aut.

I will proue so (Sir) to my power.

Clow.
[3130]

I, by any meanes proue a tall Fellow: if I do not

wonder, how thou dar’st venture to be drunke, not being

a tall Fellow, trust me not. Harke, the Kings and Prin­

ces (our Kindred) are going to see the Queenes Picture.

Come, follow vs: wee’le be thy good Masters.

Exeunt.
Scœna Tertia. [Act 5, Scene 3] Enter Leontes, Polixenes, Florizell, Perdita, Camillo, Paulina: Hermione (like a Statue:) Lords, &c. Leo.
[3135]
O graue and good Paulina, the great comfort That I haue had of thee?
Cc Paul. What

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Scœna Tertia. [Act 5, Scene 3] Enter Leontes, Polixenes, Florizell, Perdita, Camillo, Paulina: Hermione (like a Statue:) Lords, &c. Leo.
[3135]
O graue and good Paulina, the great comfort That I haue had of thee?
Paul. What (Soueraigne Sir) I did not well, I meant well: all my Seruices You haue pay’d home. But that you haue vouchsaf’d
[3140]
(With your Crown’d Brother, and these your contracted Heires of your Kingdomes) my poore House to visit; It is a surplus of your Grace, which neuer My life may last to answere.
Leo. O Paulina,
[3145]
We honor you with trouble: but we came To see the Statue of our Queene. Your Gallerie Haue we pass’d through, not without much content In many singularities; but we saw not That which my Daughter came to looke vpon,
[3150]
The Statue of her Mother.
Paul. As she liu’d peerelesse, So her dead likenesse I doe well beleeue Excells what euer yet you look’d vpon, Or hand of Man hath done: therefore I keepe it
[3155]
Louely, apart. But here it is: prepare To see the Life as liuely mock’d, as euer Still Sleepe mock’d Death: behold, and say 'tis well. I like your silence, it the more shewes‑off Your wonder: but yet speake, first you (my Liege)
[3160]
Comes it not something neere?
Leo. Her naturall Posture. Chide me (deare Stone) that I may say indeed Thou art Hermione; or rather, thou art she, In thy not chiding: for she was as tender
[3165]
As Infancie, and Grace. But yet ( Paulina) Hermione was not so much wrinckled, nothing So aged as this seems.
Pol.

Oh, not by much.

Paul. So much the more our Caruers excellence,
[3170]
Which lets goe‑by some sixteene yeeres, and makes her As she liu’d now.
Leo. As now she might haue done, So much to my good comfort, as it is Now piercing to my Soule. Oh, thus she stood,
[3175]
Euen with such Life of Maiestie (warme Life, As now it coldly stands) when first I woo’d her. I am asham’d: Do’s not the Stone rebuke me, For being more Stone then it? Oh Royall Peece: There’s Magick in thy Maiestie, which ha’s
[3180]
My Euils coniur’d to remembrance; and From thy admiring Daughter tooke the Spirits, Standing like Stone with thee.
Perd. And giue me leaue, And doe not say 'tis Superstition, that
[3185]
I kneele, and then implore her Blessing. Lady, Deere Queene, that ended when I but began, Giue me that hand of yours, to kisse.
Paul. O, patience: The Statue is but newly fix’d; the Colour’s
[3190]
Not dry.
Cam. My Lord, your Sorrow was too sore lay’d‑on, Which sixteene Winters cannot blow away, So many Summers dry: scarce any Ioy Did euer so long liue; no Sorrow,
[3195]
But kill’d it selfe much sooner.
Pol. Deere my Brother, Let him, that was the cause of this, haue powre To take‑off so much griefe from you, as he Will peece vp in himself. Paul.
[3200]
Indeed my Lord, If I had thought the sight of my poore Image Would thus haue wrought you (for the Stone is mine) Il’d not haue shew’d it.
Leo.

Doe not draw the Curtaine.

Paul.
[3205]

No longer shall you gaze on’t, least your Fancie

May thinke anon, it moues.

Leo. Let be, let be: Would I were dead, but that me thinkes alreadie. (What was he that did make it?) See (my Lord)
[3210]
Would you not deeme it breath’d? and that those veines Did verily beare blood?
Pol. 'Masterly done: The very Life seemes warme vpon her Lippe. Leo. The fixure of her Eye ha’s motion in’t,
[3215]
As we are mock’d with Art.
Paul. Ile draw the Curtaine: My Lord’s almost so farre transported, that Hee’le thinke anon it liues. Leo. Oh sweet Paulina,
[3220]
Make me to thinke so twentie yeeres together: No setled Sences of the World can match The pleasure of that madnesse. Let’t alone.
Paul. I am sorry (Sir) I haue thus farre stir’d you: but I could afflict you farther. Leo.
[3225]
Doe Paulina: For this Affliction ha’s a taste as sweet As any Cordiall comfort. Still me thinks There is an ayre comes from her. What fine Chizzell Could euer yet cut breath? Let no man mock me,
[3230]
For I will kisse her.
Paul. Good my Lord, forbeare: The ruddinesse vpon her Lippe, is wet: You’le marre it, if you kisse it; stayne your owne With Oyly Painting: shall I draw the Curtaine. Leo.
[3235]

No: not these twentie yeeres.

Perd. So long could I Stand‑by, a looker‑on. Paul. Either forbeare, Quit presently the Chappell, or resolue you
[3240]
For more amazement: if you can behold it, Ile make the Statue moue indeed; descend, And take you by the hand: but then you’le thinke (Which I protest against) I am assisted By wicked Powers.
Leo.
[3245]
What you can make her doe, I am content to looke on: what to speake, I am content to heare: for 'tis as easie To make her speake, as moue.
Paul. It is requir’d
[3250]
You doe awake your Faith: then, all stand still: On: those that thinke it is vnlawfull Businesse I am about, let them depart.
Leo. Proceed: No foot shall stire. Paul.
[3255]
Musick; awake her: Strike: 'Tis time: descend: be Stone no more: approach: Strike all that looke vpon with meruaile: Come: Ile fill your Graue vp: stirre: nay, come away: Bequeath to Death your numnesse: (for from him,
[3260]
Deare Life redeemes you) you perceiue she stirres: Start not: her Actions shall be holy, as You heare my Spell is lawfull: doe not shun her, Vntill you see her dye againe; for then You kill her double: Nay, present your Hand:
[3265]
When she was young, you woo’d her: now, in age, Is she become the Suitor?
Leo. Oh, she’s warme: If this be Magick, let it be an Art Lawfull as Eating. Pol.
[3270]

She embraces him.

Cam. She hangs about his necke, If she pertaine to life, let her speake too. Pol. I, and make it manifest where she ha’s liu’d, Or how stolne from the dead? Paul.
[3275]
That she is liuing, Were it but told you, should be hooted at Like an old Tale: but it appeares she liues, Though yet she speake not. Marke a little while: Please you to interpose (faire Madam) kneele,
[3280]
And pray your Mothers blessing: turne good Lady, Our Perdita is found.
Her. You Gods looke downe, And from your sacred Viols poure your graces Vpon my daughters head: Tell me (mine owne)
[3285]
Where hast thou bin preseru’d? Where liu’d? How found Thy Fathers Court? For thou shalt heare that I Knowing by Paulina, that the Oracle Gaue hope thou wast in being, haue preseru’d My selfe, to see the yssue.
Paul.
[3290]
There’s time enough for that, Least they desire (vpon this push) to trouble Your ioyes, with like Relation. Go together You precious winners all: your exultation Partake to euery one: I (an old Turtle)
[3295]
Will wing me to some wither’d bough, and there My Mate (that’s neuer to be found againe) Lament, till I am lost.
Leo. O peace Paulina: Thou shouldst a husband take by my consent,
[3300]
As I by thine a Wife. This is a Match, And made betweene’s by Vowes. Thou hast found mine, But how, is to be question’d: for I saw her (As I thought) dead: and haue (in vaine) said many A prayer vpon her graue. Ile not seeke farre
[3305]
(For him, I partly know his minde) to finde thee An honourable husband. Come Camillo, And take her by the hand: whose worth, and honesty Is richly noted: and heere iustified By Vs, a paire of Kings. Let’s from this place.
[3310]
What? looke vpon my Brother: both your pardons, That ere I put betweene your holy looks My ill suspition: This your Son‑in‑law, And Sonne vnto the King, whom heauens directing Is troth‑plight to your daughter. Good Paulina,
[3315]
Leade vs from hence, where we may leisurely Each one demand, and answere to his part Perform’d in this wide gap of Time, since first We were disseuer’d: Hastily lead away.
Exeunt.
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="3">
   <head rend="center">Scœna Tertia.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 5, Scene 3]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Leontes, Polixenes, Florizell, Perdita, Camillo,
      <lb/>Paulina: Hermione (like a Statue:) Lords, &amp;c.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3135">O graue and good<hi rend="italic">Paulina</hi>, the great comfort</l>
      <l n="3136">That I haue had of thee?</l>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0322-0.jpg" n="302"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3137">What (Soueraigne Sir)</l>
      <l n="3138">I did not well, I meant well: all my Seruices</l>
      <l n="3139">You haue pay’d home. But that you haue vouchsaf’d</l>
      <l n="3140">(With your Crown’d Brother, and these your contracted</l>
      <l n="3141">Heires of your Kingdomes) my poore House to visit;</l>
      <l n="3142">It is a surplus of your Grace, which neuer</l>
      <l n="3143">My life may last to answere.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3144">O<hi rend="italic">Paulina</hi>,</l>
      <l n="3145">We honor you with trouble: but we came</l>
      <l n="3146">To see the Statue of our Queene. Your Gallerie</l>
      <l n="3147">Haue we pass’d through, not without much content</l>
      <l n="3148">In many singularities; but we saw not</l>
      <l n="3149">That which my Daughter came to looke vpon,</l>
      <l n="3150">The Statue of her Mother.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3151">As she liu’d peerelesse,</l>
      <l n="3152">So her dead likenesse I doe well beleeue</l>
      <l n="3153">Excells what euer yet you look’d vpon,</l>
      <l n="3154">Or hand of Man hath done: therefore I keepe it</l>
      <l n="3155">Louely, apart. But here it is: prepare</l>
      <l n="3156">To see the Life as liuely mock’d, as euer</l>
      <l n="3157">Still Sleepe mock’d Death: behold, and say 'tis well.</l>
      <l n="3158">I like your silence, it the more shewes‑off</l>
      <l n="3159">Your wonder: but yet speake, first you (my Liege)</l>
      <l n="3160">Comes it not something neere?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3161">Her naturall Posture.</l>
      <l n="3162">Chide me (deare Stone) that I may say indeed</l>
      <l n="3163">Thou art<hi rend="italic">Hermione</hi>; or rather, thou art she,</l>
      <l n="3164">In thy not chiding: for she was as tender</l>
      <l n="3165">As Infancie, and Grace. But yet (<hi rend="italic">Paulina</hi>)</l>
      <l n="3166">
         <hi rend="italic">Hermione</hi>was not so much wrinckled, nothing</l>
      <l n="3167">So aged as this seems.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pol.</speaker>
      <p n="3168">Oh, not by much.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3169">So much the more our Caruers excellence,</l>
      <l n="3170">Which lets goe‑by some sixteene yeeres, and makes her</l>
      <l n="3171">As she liu’d now.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3172">As now she might haue done,</l>
      <l n="3173">So much to my good comfort, as it is</l>
      <l n="3174">Now piercing to my Soule. Oh, thus she stood,</l>
      <l n="3175">Euen with such Life of Maiestie (warme Life,</l>
      <l n="3176">As now it coldly stands) when first I woo’d her.</l>
      <l n="3177">I am asham’d: Do’s not the Stone rebuke me,</l>
      <l n="3178">For being more Stone then it? Oh Royall Peece:</l>
      <l n="3179">There’s Magick in thy Maiestie, which ha’s</l>
      <l n="3180">My Euils coniur’d to remembrance; and</l>
      <l n="3181">From thy admiring Daughter tooke the Spirits,</l>
      <l n="3182">Standing like Stone with thee.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-per">
      <speaker rend="italic">Perd.</speaker>
      <l n="3183">And giue me leaue,</l>
      <l n="3184">And doe not say 'tis Superstition, that</l>
      <l n="3185">I kneele, and then implore her Blessing. Lady,</l>
      <l n="3186">Deere Queene, that ended when I but began,</l>
      <l n="3187">Giue me that hand of yours, to kisse.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3188">O, patience:</l>
      <l n="3189">The Statue is but newly fix’d; the Colour’s</l>
      <l n="3190">Not dry.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-cam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cam.</speaker>
      <l n="3191">My Lord, your Sorrow was too sore lay’d‑on,</l>
      <l n="3192">Which sixteene Winters cannot blow away,</l>
      <l n="3193">So many Summers dry: scarce any Ioy</l>
      <l n="3194">Did euer so long liue; no Sorrow,</l>
      <l n="3195">But kill’d it selfe much sooner.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pol.</speaker>
      <l n="3196">Deere my Brother,</l>
      <l n="3197">Let him, that was the cause of this, haue powre</l>
      <l n="3198">To take‑off so much griefe from you, as he</l>
      <l n="3199">Will peece vp in himself.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3200">Indeed my Lord,</l>
      <l n="3201">If I had thought the sight of my poore Image</l>
      <l n="3202">Would thus haue wrought you (for the Stone is mine)</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="3203">Il’d not haue shew’d it.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <p n="3204">Doe not draw the Curtaine.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <p n="3205">No longer shall you gaze on’t, least your Fancie
      <lb n="3206"/>May thinke anon, it moues.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3207">Let be, let be:</l>
      <l n="3208">Would I were dead, but that me thinkes alreadie.</l>
      <l n="3209">(What was he that did make it?) See (my Lord)</l>
      <l n="3210">Would you not deeme it breath’d? and that those veines</l>
      <l n="3211">Did verily beare blood?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pol.</speaker>
      <l n="3212">'Masterly done:</l>
      <l n="3213">The very Life seemes warme vpon her Lippe.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3214">The fixure of her Eye ha’s motion in’t,</l>
      <l n="3215">As we are mock’d with Art.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3216">Ile draw the Curtaine:</l>
      <l n="3217">My Lord’s almost so farre transported, that</l>
      <l n="3218">Hee’le thinke anon it liues.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3219">Oh sweet<hi rend="italic">Paulina</hi>,</l>
      <l n="3220">Make me to thinke so twentie yeeres together:</l>
      <l n="3221">No setled Sences of the World can match</l>
      <l n="3222">The pleasure of that madnesse. Let’t alone.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3223">I am sorry (Sir) I haue thus farre stir’d you: but</l>
      <l n="3224">I could afflict you farther.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3225">Doe<hi rend="italic">Paulina</hi>:</l>
      <l n="3226">For this Affliction ha’s a taste as sweet</l>
      <l n="3227">As any Cordiall comfort. Still me thinks</l>
      <l n="3228">There is an ayre comes from her. What fine Chizzell</l>
      <l n="3229">Could euer yet cut breath? Let no man mock me,</l>
      <l n="3230">For I will kisse her.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3231">Good my Lord, forbeare:</l>
      <l n="3232">The ruddinesse vpon her Lippe, is wet:</l>
      <l n="3233">You’le marre it, if you kisse it; stayne your owne</l>
      <l n="3234">With Oyly Painting: shall I draw the Curtaine.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <p n="3235">No: not these twentie yeeres.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-per">
      <speaker rend="italic">Perd.</speaker>
      <l n="3236">So long could I</l>
      <l n="3237">Stand‑by, a looker‑on.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3238">Either forbeare,</l>
      <l n="3239">Quit presently the Chappell, or resolue you</l>
      <l n="3240">For more amazement: if you can behold it,</l>
      <l n="3241">Ile make the Statue moue indeed; descend,</l>
      <l n="3242">And take you by the hand: but then you’le thinke</l>
      <l n="3243">(Which I protest against) I am assisted</l>
      <l n="3244">By wicked Powers.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3245">What you can make her doe,</l>
      <l n="3246">I am content to looke on: what to speake,</l>
      <l n="3247">I am content to heare: for 'tis as easie</l>
      <l n="3248">To make her speake, as moue.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3249">It is requir’d</l>
      <l n="3250">You doe awake your Faith: then, all stand still:</l>
      <l n="3251">On: those that thinke it is vnlawfull Businesse</l>
      <l n="3252">I am about, let them depart.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3253">Proceed:</l>
      <l n="3254">No foot shall stire.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3255">Musick; awake her: Strike:</l>
      <l n="3256">'Tis time: descend: be Stone no more: approach:</l>
      <l n="3257">Strike all that looke vpon with meruaile: Come:</l>
      <l n="3258">Ile fill your Graue vp: stirre: nay, come away:</l>
      <l n="3259">Bequeath to Death your numnesse: (for from him,</l>
      <l n="3260">Deare Life redeemes you) you perceiue she stirres:</l>
      <l n="3261">Start not: her Actions shall be holy, as</l>
      <l n="3262">You heare my Spell is lawfull: doe not shun her,</l>
      <l n="3263">Vntill you see her dye againe; for then</l>
      <l n="3264">You kill her double: Nay, present your Hand:</l>
      <l n="3265">When she was young, you woo’d her: now, in age,</l>
      <l n="3266">Is she become the Suitor?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3267">Oh, she’s warme:</l>
      <l n="3268">If this be Magick, let it be an Art</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0323-0.jpg" n="303"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="3269">Lawfull as Eating.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pol.</speaker>
      <p n="3270">She embraces him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-cam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Cam.</speaker>
      <l n="3271">She hangs about his necke,</l>
      <l n="3272">If she pertaine to life, let her speake too.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pol.</speaker>
      <l n="3273">I, and make it manifest where she ha’s liu’d,</l>
      <l n="3274">Or how stolne from the dead?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3275">That she is liuing,</l>
      <l n="3276">Were it but told you, should be hooted at</l>
      <l n="3277">Like an old Tale: but it appeares she liues,</l>
      <l n="3278">Though yet she speake not. Marke a little while:</l>
      <l n="3279">Please you to interpose (faire Madam) kneele,</l>
      <l n="3280">And pray your Mothers blessing: turne good Lady,</l>
      <l n="3281">Our<hi rend="italic">Perdita</hi>is found.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-her">
      <speaker rend="italic">Her.</speaker>
      <l n="3282">You Gods looke downe,</l>
      <l n="3283">And from your sacred Viols poure your graces</l>
      <l n="3284">Vpon my daughters head: Tell me (mine owne)</l>
      <l n="3285">Where hast thou bin preseru’d? Where liu’d? How found</l>
      <l n="3286">Thy Fathers Court? For thou shalt heare that I</l>
      <l n="3287">Knowing by<hi rend="italic">Paulina</hi>, that the Oracle</l>
      <l n="3288">Gaue hope thou wast in being, haue preseru’d</l>
      <l n="3289">My selfe, to see the yssue.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-pau">
      <speaker rend="italic">Paul.</speaker>
      <l n="3290">There’s time enough for that,</l>
      <l n="3291">Least they desire (vpon this push) to trouble</l>
      <l n="3292">Your ioyes, with like Relation. Go together</l>
      <l n="3293">You precious winners all: your exultation</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="3294">Partake to euery one: I (an old Turtle)</l>
      <l n="3295">Will wing me to some wither’d bough, and there</l>
      <l n="3296">My Mate (that’s neuer to be found againe)</l>
      <l n="3297">Lament, till I am lost.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-leo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Leo.</speaker>
      <l n="3298">O peace<hi rend="italic">Paulina</hi>:</l>
      <l n="3299">Thou shouldst a husband take by my consent,</l>
      <l n="3300">As I by thine a Wife. This is a Match,</l>
      <l n="3301">And made betweene’s by Vowes. Thou hast found mine,</l>
      <l n="3302">But how, is to be question’d: for I saw her</l>
      <l n="3303">(As I thought) dead: and haue (in vaine) said many</l>
      <l n="3304">A prayer vpon her graue. Ile not seeke farre</l>
      <l n="3305">(For him, I partly know his minde) to finde thee</l>
      <l n="3306">An honourable husband. Come<hi rend="italic">Camillo</hi>,</l>
      <l n="3307">And take her by the hand: whose worth, and honesty</l>
      <l n="3308">Is richly noted: and heere iustified</l>
      <l n="3309">By Vs, a paire of Kings. Let’s from this place.</l>
      <l n="3310">What? looke vpon my Brother: both your pardons,</l>
      <l n="3311">That ere I put betweene your holy looks</l>
      <l n="3312">My ill suspition: This your Son‑in‑law,</l>
      <l n="3313">And Sonne vnto the King, whom heauens directing</l>
      <l n="3314">Is troth‑plight to your daughter. Good<hi rend="italic">Paulina</hi>,</l>
      <l n="3315">Leade vs from hence, where we may leisurely</l>
      <l n="3316">Each one demand, and answere to his part</l>
      <l n="3317">Perform’d in this wide gap of Time, since first</l>
      <l n="3318">We were disseuer’d: Hastily lead away.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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