The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: oo1r - Tragedies, p. 257

Left Column


The Tragedie of Hamlet. This page is either worn or imperfectly inked, so parts of many letters are missing.
[590]
What does this meane my Lord ?
Ham. The King doth Wake to night, and takes his (rouse, Keepes wassels and the swaggering vpspring reeles, And as he dreines his draughts of Renish downe, The kettle Drum and Trumpet thus bray out
[595]
The triumph of his Pledge.
Horat. Is it a custome? Ham. I marry ist; And to my mind, though I am natiue heere, And the manner borne: It is a Custome The final "e" here and in the previous line are only partially inked.
[600]
More honour'd in the breach, then the obseruance.
Enter Ghost. Hor. Looke my Lord, it comes. Ham. Angels and Ministers of Grace defend vs: Be thou a Spirit of health, or Goblin damn'd, Bring with thee ayres from Heauen, or blasts from Hell,
[605]
Be thy euents wicked or charitable, Thou com'st in such a questionable shape That I will speake to thee. Ile call thee Hamlet, King, Father, Royall Dane: Oh, oh, answer me, Let me not burst in Ignorance; but tell
[610]
Why thy Canoniz'd bones Hearsed in death, Haue burst their cerments, why the Sepulcher Wherein we saw thee quietly enurn'd, Hath op'd his ponderous and Marble iawes, To cast thee vp againe? What may this meane?
[615]
That thou dead Coarse againe in compleat steele, Reuisits thus the glimpses of the Moone, Making Night hidious? And we fooles of Nature, So horridly to shake our disposition, With thoughts beyond thee; reaches of our Soules,
[620]
Say, why is this? wherefore? what should we doe?
Ghost b eckens Hamlet. Hor. It beckons you to goe away with it, As if it some impartment did desire To you alone. Mar. Looke with what courteous action
[625]
It wafts you to a more remoued ground: But doe not goe with it.
Hor. No, by no meanes. Ham. It will not speake: then will I follow it. Hor. Doe not my Lord. Ham.
[630]
Why, what should be the feare? I doe not set my life at a pins fee; And for my Soule, what can it doe to that? Being a thing immortall as it selfe: It waues me forth againe; Ile follow it.
Hor.
[635]
What if it tempt you toward the Floud my Lord? Or to the dreadfull Sonnet of the Cliffe, That beetles o're his base into the Sea, And there assumes some other horrible forme, Which might depriue your Soueraignty of Reason,
[640]
And draw you into madnesse thinke of it?
Ham. It wafts me still: goe on, Ile follow thee. Mar. You shall not goe my Lord. Ham. Hold off your hand. Hor. Be rul'd, you shall not goe. Ham.
[645]
My fate cries out, And makes each petty Artire in this body, As hardy as the Nemian Lions nerue: Still am I cal'd? Vnhand me Gentlemen: By Heau'n, Ile make a Ghost of him that lets me:
[650]
I say away, goe on, Ile follow thee.
Exeunt Ghost & Hamlet. Hor. He waxes desperate with imagination. Mar. Let's follow; 'tis not fit thus to obey him.

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Right Column


Hor. Haue after, to what issue will this come? Mar. Something is rotten in the State of Denmarke. Hor.
[655]
Heauen will direct it.
Mar. Nay, let's follow him. Exeunt.
[Act 1, Scene 5] Enter Ghost and Hamlet. Ham. Where wilt thou lead me? speak; Ile go no fur­ (ther. Gho. Marke me. Ham. I will. Gho.
[660]
My hower is almost come, When I to sulphurous and tormenting Flames Must render vp my selfe.
Ham. Alas poore Ghost. Gho. Pitty me not, but lend thy serious hearing
[665]
To what I shall vnfold.
Ham. Speake, I am bound to heare. Gho. So art thou to reuenge, when thou shalt heare. Ham. What? Gho. I am thy Fathers Spirit,
[670]
Doom'd for a certain terme to walke the night; And for the day confin'd to fast in Fiers, Till the foule crimes done in my dayes of Nature Are burnt and purg'd away? But that I am forbid To tell the secrets of my Prison‑House;
[675]
I could a Tale vnfold, whose lightest word Would harrow vp thy soule, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like Starres, start from their Spheres, Thy knotty and combined locks to part, And each particular haire to stand an end,
[680]
Like Quilles vpon the fretfull Porpentine: But this eternall blason must not be To eares of flesh and bloud; list Hamlet, oh list, If thou didst euer thy deare Father loue.
Ham. Oh Heauen! Gho.
[685]
Reuenge his foule and most vnnaturall Murther.
Ham. Murther? Ghost. Murther most foule, as in the best it is; But this most foule, strange, and vnnaturall. Ham. Hast, hast me to know it,
[690]
That with wings as swift As meditation, or the thoughts of Loue, May sweepe to my Reuenge.
Ghost. I finde thee apt, And duller should'st thou be then the fat weede
[695]
That rots it selfe in ease, on Lethe Wharfe, Would'st thou not stirre in this. Now Hamlet heare: It's giuen out, that sleeping in mine Orchard, A Serpent stung me: so the whole eare of Denmarke, Is by a forged processe of my death
[700]
Rankly abus'd: But know thou Noble youth, The Serpent that did sting thy Fathers life, Now weares his Crowne.
Ham. O my Propheticke soule: mine Vncle? Ghost. I that incestuous, that adul erate Beast
[705]
With witchcraft of his wits, hath Traitorous guifts. Oh wicked Wit, and Gifts, that haue the power So to seduce ? Won to to to this shamefull Lust The will of my most seeming vertuous Queene: Oh Hamlet, what a falling off was there,
[710]
From me, whose loue was of that dignity, That it went hand in hand, euen with the Vow I made to her in Marriage; and to decline Vpon a wretch, whose Naturall gifts were poore To those of mine. But Vertue, as it neuer wil be moued,
[715]
Though Lewdnesse court it in a shape of Heauen: So Lust, though to a radiant Angell link'd, Will sate it selfe in a Celestiall bed, & prey on Garbage. Oo But

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[Act 1, Scene 3] Scena Tertia. Enter Laertes and Ophelia. Laer. My necessaries are imbark't; Farewell: And Sister, as the Winds giue Benefit,
[445]
And Conuoy is assistant; doe not sleepe, But let me heare from you.
Ophel. Doe you doubt that? Laer. For Hamlet, and the trifling of his fauours, Hold it a fashion and a toy in Bloud;
[450]
A Violet in the youth of Primy Nature; Froward, not permanent; sweet not lasting The suppliance of a minute? No more.
Ophel. No more but so. Laer. Thinke it no more:
[455]
For nature cressant does not grow alone, In thewes and Bulke: but as his Temple waxes, The inward seruice of the Minde and Soule Growes wide withall. Perhaps he loues you now, And now no soyle nor cautell doth besmerch
[460]
The vertue of his feare: but you must feare His greatnesse weigh'd, his will is not his owne; For hee himselfe is subiect to his Birth: Hee may not, as vnuallued persons doe, Carue for himselfe; for, on his choyce depends
[465]
The sanctity and health of the weole State. And therefore must his choyce be circumscrib'd Vnto the voyce and yeelding of that Body, Whereof he is the Head. Then if he sayes he loues you, It fits your wisedome so farre to beleeue it;
[470]
As he in his peculiar Sect and force May giue his saying deed: which is no further, Then the maine voyce of Denmarke goes withall. Then weigh what losse your Honour may sustaine, If with too credent eare you list his Songs;
[475]
Or lose your Heart; or your chast Treasure open To his vnmastred importunity. Feare it Ophelia, feare it my deare Sister, And keepe within the reare of your Affection; Out of the shot and danger of Desire.
[480]
The chariest Maid is Prodigall enough, If she vnmaske her beauty to the Moone; Vertue it selfe scapes not calumnious stroakes, The Canker Galls, the Infants of the Spring Too oft before the buttons be disclos'd,
[485]
And in the Morne and liquid dew of Youth, Contagious blastments are most imminent. Be wary then, best safety lies in feare; Youth to it selfe rebels, though none else neere.
Ophe. I shall th'effect of this good Lesson keepe,
[490]
As watchmen to my heart: but good my Brother Doe not as some vngracious Pastors doe, Shew me the steepe and thorny way to Heauen; Whilst like a puft and recklesse Libertine Himselfe, the Primrose path of dalliance treads,
[495]
And reaks not his owne reade.
Laer. Oh, feare me not. Enter Polonius. I stay too long; but here my Father comes: A double blessing is a double grace; Occasion smiles vpon a second leaue. Palon.
[500]
Yet heere Laertes? Aboord, aboord for shame, The winde sits in the shoulder of your saile, And you are staid for there: my blessing with you; And these few Precepts in thy memory, See thou Character. Giue thy thoughts no tongue,
[505]
Nor any vnproportion'd thought his Act: Be thou familiar; but by no meanes vulgar: The friends thou hast, and their adoption tride, Grapple them to thy Soule, with hoopes of Steele; But doe not dull thy palme, with entertainment
[510]
Of each vnhatch't, vnfledg'd Comrade. Beware Of entrance to a quarrell: but being in Bear't that th'opposed may beware of thee. Giue euery man thine eare; but few thy voyce: Take each mans censure; but reserue thy iudgement:
[515]
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy; But not exprest in fancie; rich, not gawdie: For the Apparell oft proclaimes the man. And they in France of the best ranck and station, Are of a most select and generous cheff in that.
[520]
Neither a borrower, nor a lender be; For lone oft loses both it selfe and friend: And borrowing duls the edge of Husbandry. This aboue all; to thine owne selfe be true: And it must follow, as the Night the Day,
[525]
Thou canst not then be false to any man. Farewell: my Blessing season this in thee.
Laer. Most humbly doe I take my leaue, my Lord. Polon. The time inuites you, goe, your seruants send. Laer. Farewell Ophelia, and remember well
[530]
What I haue said to you.
Ophe. Tis in my memory lockt, And you your selfe shall keepe the key of it. Laer. Farewell. Exit Laer. Polon. What ist Ophelia he hath said to you ? Ophe.
[535]
So please you, somthing touching the L. Lord Hamlet.
Polon. Marry, well bethought: Tis told me he hath very oft of late Giuen priuate time to you; and you your selfe Haue of your audience beene most free and bounteous.
[540]
If it be so, as so tis put on me; And that in way of caution: I must tell you, You doe not vnderstand your selfe so cleerely, As it behoues my Daughter, and your Honour. What is betweene you, giue me vp the truth?
Ophe.
[545]
He hath my Lord of late, made many tenders Of his affection to me.
Polon. Affection, puh. You speake like a greene Girle, Vnsifted in such perillous Circumstance. Doe you beleeue his tenders, as you call them? Ophe.
[550]
I do not know, my Lord, what I should thinke.
Polon. Marry Ile teach you; thinke your selfe a Baby, That you haue tane his tenders for true pay, Which are not starling. Tender your selfe more dearly; Or not to crack the winde of the poore Phrase,
[555]
Roaming it thus, you'l tender me a foole.
Ophe. My Lord, he hath importun'd me with loue, In honourable fashion. Polon. I, fashion you may call it, go too, go too. Ophe. And hath giuen countenance to his speech,
[560]
My Lord, with all the vowes of Heauen.
Polon. I, Springes to catch Woodcocks. I doe know When the Bloud burnes, how Prodigall the Soule Giues the tongue vowes: these blazes, Daughter, Giuing more light then heate; extinct in both,
[565]
Euen in their promise, as it is a making; You muft must not take for fire. For this time Daughter, Be somewhat scanter of your Maiden presence; Set your entreatments at a higher rate, Then a command to parley. For Lord Hamlet,
[570]
Beleeue so much in him, that he is young, And with a larger tether may he walke, Then may be giuen you. In few, Ophelia, Doe not beleeue his vowes; for they are Broakers, Not of the eye, which their Inuestments show:
[575]
But meere implorators of vnholy Sutes, Breathing like sanctified and pious bonds, The better to beguile. This is for all: I would not, in plaine tearmes, from this time forth, Haue you so slander any moment leisure,
[580]
As to giue words or talke with the Lord Hamlet: Looke too't, I charge you; come your wayes.
Ophe. I shall obey my Lord. Exeunt.
 

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<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<div type="scene" n="3">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 1, Scene 3]</head>
   <head rend="italic center">Scena Tertia.</head>
   <stage rend="center italic" type="entrance">Enter Laertes and Ophelia.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-ham-lae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Laer.</speaker>
      <l n="443">My necessaries are imbark't; Farewell:</l>
      <l n="444">And Sister, as the Winds giue Benefit,</l>
      <l n="445">And Conuoy is assistant; doe not sleepe,</l>
      <l n="446">But let me heare from you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophel.</speaker>
      <l n="447">Doe you doubt that?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-lae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Laer.</speaker>
      <l n="448">For<hi rend="italic">Hamlet</hi>, and the trifling of his fauours,</l>
      <l n="449">Hold it a fashion and a toy in Bloud;</l>
      <l n="450">A Violet in the youth of Primy Nature;</l>
      <l n="451">Froward, not permanent; sweet not lasting</l>
      <l n="452">The suppliance of a minute? No more.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophel.</speaker>
      <l n="453">No more but so.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-lae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Laer.</speaker>
      <l n="454">Thinke it no more:</l>
      <l n="455">For nature cressant does not grow alone,</l>
      <l n="456">In thewes and Bulke: but as his Temple waxes,</l>
      <l n="457">The inward seruice of the Minde and Soule</l>
      <l n="458">Growes wide withall. Perhaps he loues you now,</l>
      <l n="459">And now no soyle nor cautell doth besmerch</l>
      <l n="460">The vertue of his feare: but you must feare</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0766-0.jpg" n="156"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="461">His greatnesse weigh'd, his will is not his owne;</l>
      <l n="462">For hee himselfe is subiect to his Birth:</l>
      <l n="463">Hee may not, as vnuallued persons doe,</l>
      <l n="464">Carue for himselfe; for, on his choyce depends</l>
      <l n="465">The sanctity and health of the weole State.</l>
      <l n="466">And therefore must his choyce be circumscrib'd</l>
      <l n="467">Vnto the voyce and yeelding of that Body,</l>
      <l n="468">Whereof he is the Head. Then if he sayes he loues you,</l>
      <l n="469">It fits your wisedome so farre to beleeue it;</l>
      <l n="470">As he in his peculiar Sect and force</l>
      <l n="471">May giue his saying deed: which is no further,</l>
      <l n="472">Then the maine voyce of<hi rend="italic">Denmarke</hi>goes withall.</l>
      <l n="473">Then weigh what losse your Honour may sustaine,</l>
      <l n="474">If with too credent eare you list his Songs;</l>
      <l n="475">Or lose your Heart; or your chast Treasure open</l>
      <l n="476">To his vnmastred importunity.</l>
      <l n="477">Feare it<hi rend="italic">Ophelia</hi>, feare it my deare Sister,</l>
      <l n="478">And keepe within the reare of your Affection;</l>
      <l n="479">Out of the shot and danger of Desire.</l>
      <l n="480">The chariest Maid is Prodigall enough,</l>
      <l n="481">If she vnmaske her beauty to the Moone;</l>
      <l n="482">Vertue it selfe scapes not calumnious stroakes,</l>
      <l n="483">The Canker Galls, the Infants of the Spring</l>
      <l n="484">Too oft before the buttons be disclos'd,</l>
      <l n="485">And in the Morne and liquid dew of Youth,</l>
      <l n="486">Contagious blastments are most imminent.</l>
      <l n="487">Be wary then, best safety lies in feare;</l>
      <l n="488">Youth to it selfe rebels, though none else neere.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophe.</speaker>
      <l n="489">I shall th'effect of this good Lesson keepe,</l>
      <l n="490">As watchmen to my heart: but good my Brother</l>
      <l n="491">Doe not as some vngracious Pastors doe,</l>
      <l n="492">Shew me the steepe and thorny way to Heauen;</l>
      <l n="493">Whilst like a puft and recklesse Libertine</l>
      <l n="494">Himselfe, the Primrose path of dalliance treads,</l>
      <l n="495">And reaks not his owne reade.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-lae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Laer.</speaker>
      <l n="496">Oh, feare me not.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Polonius.</stage>
      <l n="497">I stay too long; but here my Father comes:</l>
      <l n="498">A double blessing is a double grace;</l>
      <l n="499">Occasion smiles vpon a second leaue.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Palon.</speaker>
      <l n="500">Yet heere<hi rend="italic">Laertes?</hi>Aboord, aboord for shame,</l>
      <l n="501">The winde sits in the shoulder of your saile,</l>
      <l n="502">And you are staid for there: my blessing with you;</l>
      <l n="503">And these few Precepts in thy memory,</l>
      <l n="504">See thou Character. Giue thy thoughts no tongue,</l>
      <l n="505">Nor any vnproportion'd thought his Act:</l>
      <l n="506">Be thou familiar; but by no meanes vulgar:</l>
      <l n="507">The friends thou hast, and their adoption tride,</l>
      <l n="508">Grapple them to thy Soule, with hoopes of Steele;</l>
      <l n="509">But doe not dull thy palme, with entertainment</l>
      <l n="510">Of each vnhatch't, vnfledg'd Comrade. Beware</l>
      <l n="511">Of entrance to a quarrell: but being in</l>
      <l n="512">Bear't that th'opposed may beware of thee.</l>
      <l n="513">Giue euery man thine eare; but few thy voyce:</l>
      <l n="514">Take each mans censure; but reserue thy iudgement:</l>
      <l n="515">Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy;</l>
      <l n="516">But not exprest in fancie; rich, not gawdie:</l>
      <l n="517">For the Apparell oft proclaimes the man.</l>
      <l n="518">And they in France of the best ranck and station,</l>
      <l n="519">Are of a most select and generous cheff in that.</l>
      <l n="520">Neither a borrower, nor a lender be;</l>
      <l n="521">For lone oft loses both it selfe and friend:</l>
      <l n="522">And borrowing duls the edge of Husbandry.</l>
      <l n="523">This aboue all; to thine owne selfe be true:</l>
      <l n="524">And it must follow, as the Night the Day,</l>
      <l n="525">Thou canst not then be false to any man.</l>
      <cb n="2"/>
      <l n="526">Farewell: my Blessing season this in thee.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-lae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Laer.</speaker>
      <l n="527">Most humbly doe I take my leaue, my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Polon.</speaker>
      <l n="528">The time inuites you, goe, your seruants send.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-lae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Laer.</speaker>
      <l n="529">Farewell<hi rend="italic">Ophelia,</hi>and remember well</l>
      <l n="530">What I haue said to you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophe.</speaker>
      <l n="531">Tis in my memory lockt,</l>
      <l n="532">And you your selfe shall keepe the key of it.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-lae">
      <speaker rend="italic">Laer.</speaker>
      <l n="533">
         <hi rend="italic">Farewell.</hi>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit Laer.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-ham-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Polon.</speaker>
      <l n="534">What ist<hi rend="italic">Ophelia</hi>he hath said to you<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophe.</speaker>
      <l n="535">So please you, somthing touching the<choice>
            <abbr>L.</abbr>
            <expan>Lord</expan>
         </choice>
         <hi rend="italic">Hamlet.</hi>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Polon.</speaker>
      <l n="536">Marry, well bethought:</l>
      <l n="537">Tis told me he hath very oft of late</l>
      <l n="538">Giuen priuate time to you; and you your selfe</l>
      <l n="539">Haue of your audience beene most free and bounteous.</l>
      <l n="540">If it be so, as so tis put on me;</l>
      <l n="541">And that in way of caution: I must tell you,</l>
      <l n="542">You doe not vnderstand your selfe so cleerely,</l>
      <l n="543">As it behoues my Daughter, and your Honour.</l>
      <l n="544">What is betweene you, giue me vp the truth?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophe.</speaker>
      <l n="545">He hath my Lord of late, made many tenders</l>
      <l n="546">Of his affection to me.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Polon.</speaker>
      <l n="547">Affection, puh. You speake like a greene Girle,</l>
      <l n="548">Vnsifted in such perillous Circumstance.</l>
      <l n="549">Doe you beleeue his tenders, as you call them?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophe.</speaker>
      <l n="550">I do not know, my Lord, what I should thinke.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Polon.</speaker>
      <l n="551">Marry Ile teach you; thinke your selfe a Baby,</l>
      <l n="552">That you haue tane his tenders for true pay,</l>
      <l n="553">Which are not starling. Tender your selfe more dearly;</l>
      <l n="554">Or not to crack the winde of the poore Phrase,</l>
      <l n="555">Roaming it thus, you'l tender me a foole.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophe.</speaker>
      <l n="556">My Lord, he hath importun'd me with loue,</l>
      <l n="557">In honourable fashion.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Polon.</speaker>
      <l n="558">I, fashion you may call it, go too, go too.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophe.</speaker>
      <l n="559">And hath giuen countenance to his speech,</l>
      <l n="560">My Lord, with all the vowes of Heauen.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-pol">
      <speaker rend="italic">Polon.</speaker>
      <l n="561">I, Springes to catch Woodcocks. I doe know</l>
      <l n="562">When the Bloud burnes, how Prodigall the Soule</l>
      <l n="563">Giues the tongue vowes: these blazes, Daughter,</l>
      <l n="564">Giuing more light then heate; extinct in both,</l>
      <l n="565">Euen in their promise, as it is a making;</l>
      <l n="566">You<choice>
            <orig>muft</orig>
            <corr>must</corr>
         </choice>not take for fire. For this time Daughter,</l>
      <l n="567">Be somewhat scanter of your Maiden presence;</l>
      <l n="568">Set your entreatments at a higher rate,</l>
      <l n="569">Then a command to parley. For Lord<hi rend="italic">Hamlet</hi>,</l>
      <l n="570">Beleeue so much in him, that he is young,</l>
      <l n="571">And with a larger tether may he walke,</l>
      <l n="572">Then may be giuen you. In few,<hi rend="italic">Ophelia,</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="573">Doe not beleeue his vowes; for they are Broakers,</l>
      <l n="574">Not of the eye, which their Inuestments show:</l>
      <l n="575">But meere implorators of vnholy Sutes,</l>
      <l n="576">Breathing like sanctified and pious bonds,</l>
      <l n="577">The better to beguile. This is for all:</l>
      <l n="578">I would not, in plaine tearmes, from this time forth,</l>
      <l n="579">Haue you so slander any moment leisure,</l>
      <l n="580">As to giue words or talke with the Lord<hi rend="italic">Hamlet</hi>:</l>
      <l n="581">Looke too't, I charge you; come your wayes.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-ham-oph">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ophe.</speaker>
      <l n="582">I shall obey my Lord.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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