The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: T1v - Comedies, p. 218

Left Column


The Taming of the Shrew. Shee is your owne, else you must pardon me: If you should die before him, where's her dower? Tra. That's but a cauill: he is olde, I young. Gre.
[1220]
And may not yong men die as well as old?
Bap. Well gentlemen, I am thus resolu'd, On sonday next, you know My daughter Katherine is to be married: Now on the sonday following, shall Bianca
[1225]
Be Bride to you, if you make this assurance: If not, to Signior Gremio: And so I take my leaue, and thanke you both.
Exit. Gre. Adieu good neighbour: now I feare thee not: Sirra, yong gamester, your father were a foole
[1230]
To giue thee all, and in his wayning age Set foot vnder thy table: tut, a toy, An olde Italian foxe is not so kinde my boy.
Exit. Tra. A vengeance on your crafty withered hide, Yet I haue fac'd it with a card of ten:
[1235]
'Tis in my head to doe my master good: I see no reason but suppos'd Lucentio Must get a father, call'd suppos'd Vincentio, And that's a wonder: fathers commonly Doe get their children: but in this case of woing,
[1240]
A childe shall get a sire, if I faile not of my cunning.
Exit.
Actus Tertia. [Act 3, Scene 1] Enter Lucentio, Hortentio, and Bianca. Luc. Fidler forbeare, you grow too forward Sir, Haue you so soone forgot the entertainment Her sister Katherine welcom'd you withall. Hort. But wrangling pedant, this is
[1245]
The patronesse of heauenly harmony: Then giue me leaue to haue prerogatiue, And when in Musicke we haue spent an houre, Your Lecture shall haue leisure for as much.
Luc. Preposterous Asse that neuer read so farre,
[1250]
To know the cause why musicke was ordain'd: Was it not to refresh the minde of man After his studies, or his vsuall paine? Then giue me leaue to read Philosophy, And while I pause, serue in your harmony.
Hort.
[1255]
Sirra, I will not beare these braues of thine.
Bianc. Why gentlemen, you doe me double wrong, To striue for that which resteth in my choice: I am no breeching scholler in the schooles, Ile not be tied to howres, nor pointed times,
[1260]
But learne my Lessons as I please my selfe, And to cut off all strife: heere sit we downe, Take you your instrument, play you the whiles, His Lecture will be done ere you haue tun'd.
Hort. You'll leaue his Lecture when I am in tune? Luc.
[1265]
That will be neuer, tune your instrument.
Bian. Where left we last ? Luc.

Heere Madam: Hic Ibat Simois, hic est sigeria tellus, hic steterat Priami regia Celsa senis .

Bian. Conster them. Luc.
[1270]

Hic Ibat, as I told you before, Simois, I am Lu­

centio, hic est, sonne vnto Vincentio of Pisa, Sigeria te­ llus , disguised thus to get your loue, hic steterat, and that

Lucentio that comes a wooing, priami, is my man Tra­

nio, regia, bearing my port, celsa senis that we might be­

[1275]

guile the old Pantalowne.

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[full image]

Right Column


Hort. Madam, my Instrument's in tune. Bian. Let's heare, oh fie, the treble iarres. Luc. Spit in the hole man, and tune againe. Bian.

Now let mee see if I can conster it. Hic ibat si­ mois , I know you not, hic est sigeria tellus, I trust you not,

hic staterat priami, take heede he heare vs not, regia pre­

sume not, Celsa senis, despaire not.

Hort. Madam, tis now in tune. Luc. All but the base. Hort.
[1285]
The base is right, 'tis the base knaue that iars.
Luc. How fiery and forward our Pedant is, Now for my life the knaue doth court my loue, Pedascule, Ile watch you better yet: In time I may beleeue, yet I mistrust. Bian.
[1290]
Mistrust it not, for sure Æacides Was Aiax cald so from his grandfather.
Hort. This speech is conventionally attributed to Bianca. I must beleeue my master, else I promise you, I should be arguing still vpon that doubt, But let it rest, now Litio to you:
[1295]
Good master take it not vnkindly pray That I haue beene thus pleasant with you both.
Hort. You may go walk, and giue me leaue a while, My Lessons make no musicke in three parts. Luc. Are you so formall sir, well I must waite
[1300]
And watch withall, for but I be deceiu'd, Our fine Musitian groweth amorous.
Hor. Madam, before you touch the instrument, To learne the order of my fingering, I must begin with rudiments of Art,
[1305]
To teach you gamoth in a briefer sort, More pleasant, pithy, and effectuall, Then hath beene taught by any of my trade, And there it is in writing fairely drawne.
Bian. Why, I am past my gamouth long agoe. Hor.
[1310]
Yet read the gamouth of Hortentio.
Bian. Gamouth I am, the ground of all accord: Are, to plead Hortensio's passion: Beeme, Bianca take him for thy Lord Cfavt, that loues with all affection:
[1315]
D solre, one Cliffe, two notes haue I, Elami, show pitty or I die. Call you this gamouth? tut I like it not, Old fashions please me best, I am not so nice To charge true rules for old inuentions.
Enter a Messenger. Nicke.
[1320]
Mistresse, your father prayes you leaue your (books, And helpe to dresse your sisters chamber vp, You know to morrow is the wedding day.
Bian. Farewell sweet masters both, I must be gone. Luc. Faith Mistresse then I haue no cause to stay. Hor.
[1325]
But I haue cause to pry into this pedant, Methinkes he lookes as though he were in loue: Yet if thy thoughts Bianca be so humble To cast thy wandring eyes on euery stale: Seize thee that List, if once I finde thee ranging,
[1330]
Hortensio will be quit with thee by changing.
Exit.
[Act 3, Scene 2] Enter Baptista, Gremio, Tranio, Katherine, Bianca, and o­ thers, attendants. Bap. Signior Lucentio, this is the pointed day That Katherine and Petruchio should be married, And yet we heare not of our sonne in Law: What will be said, what mockery will it be?
[1335]
To want the Bride‑groome when the Priest attends To speake the ceremoniall rites of marriage? What saies Lucentio to this shame of ours?
No

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[Act 3, Scene 2] Enter Baptista, Gremio, Tranio, Katherine, Bianca, and o­ thers, attendants. Bap. Signior Lucentio, this is the pointed day That Katherine and Petruchio should be married, And yet we heare not of our sonne in Law: What will be said, what mockery will it be?
[1335]
To want the Bride‑groome when the Priest attends To speake the ceremoniall rites of marriage? What saies Lucentio to this shame of ours?
Kate. No shame but mine, I must forsooth be forst To giue my hand oppos'd against my heart
[1340]
Vnto a mad‑braine rudesby, full of spleene, Who woo'd in haste, and meanes to wed at leysure: I told you I, he was a franticke foole, Hiding his bitter iests in blunt behauiour, And to be noted for a merry man;
[1345]
Hee'll wooe a thousand, point the day of marriage, Make friends, inuite, and proclaime the banes, Yet neuer meanes to wed where he hath woo'd: Now must the world point at poore Katherine, And say, loe, there is mad Petruchio's wife
[1350]
If it would please him come and marry her.
Tra. Patience good Katherine and Baptista too, Vpon my life Petruchio meanes but well, What euer fortune stayes him from his word, Though he be blunt, I know him passing wise,
[1355]
Though he be merry, yet withall he's honest.
Kate. Would Katherine had neuer seen him though. Exit weeping. Bap. Goe girle, I cannot blame thee now to weepe, For such an iniurie would vexe a very saint, Much more a shrew of impatient humour. Enter Biondello. Bion.
[1360]

Master, master, newes, and such newes as you

neuer heard of,

Bap. Is it new and olde too? how may that be? Bion. Why, is it not newes to heard of Petruchio's (comming? Bap. Is he come? Bion.
[1365]
Why no sir.
Bap. What then? Bion. He is comming. Bap. When will he be heere ? Bion. When he stands where I am, and sees you there. Tra.
[1370]
But say, what to thine olde newes?
Bion.

Why Petruchio is comming, in a new hat and

an old ierkin, a paire of old breeches thrice turn'd; a

paire of bootes that haue beene candle­cases, one buck­

led, another lac'd: an olde rusty sword tane out of the

[1375]

Towne Armory, with a broken hilt, and chapelesse: with

two broken points: his horse hip'd with an olde mo­

thy saddle, and stirrops of no kindred: besides possest

with the glanders, and like to mose in the chine, trou­

bled with the Lampasse, infected with the fashions, full

[1380]

of Windegalls, sped with Spauins, raied with the Yel­

lowes, past cure of the Fiues, starke spoyl'd with the

Staggers, begnawne with the Bots, Waid in the backe,

and shoulder‑shotten, neere leg'd before, and with a

halfe‑chekt Bitte, & a headstall of sheepes leather, which

[1385]

being restrain'd to keepe him from stumbling, hath been

often burst, and now repaired with knots: one girth sixe

times peec'd, and a womans Crupper of velure, which

hath two letters for her name, fairely set down in studs,

and heere and there peec'd with packthred.

Bap.
[1390]
Who comes with him?
Bion.

Oh sir, his Lackey, for all the world Capari­

soned like the horse: with a linnen stock on one leg, and

a kersey boot‑hose on the other, gartred with a red and

blew list; an old hat, & the humor of forty fancies prickt

[1395]

in't for a feather: a monster, a very monster in apparell,

& not like a Christian foot‑boy, or a gentlemans Lacky.

Tra. 'Tis some od humor pricks him to this fashion, Yet oftentimes he goes but meane apparel'd. Bap. I am glad he's come, howsoere he comes. Bion.
[1400]
Why sir, he comes not.
Bap. Didst thou not say hee comes? Bion. Who, that Petruchio came? Bap. I, that Petruchio came. Bion. No sir, I say his horse comes with him on his (backe. Bap.
[1405]
Why that's all one.
Bion.

Nay by S.Saint Iamy, I hold you a penny, a horse and

a man is more then one, and yet not many.

Enter Petruchio and Grumio. Pet. Come, where be these gallants? who's at home? Bap. You are welcome sir. Petr.
[1410]
And yet I come not well.
Bap. And yet you halt not. Tra. Not so well apparell'd as I wish you were. Petr. Were it better I should rush in thus: But where is Kate? where is my louely Bride?
[1415]
How does my father? gentles methinkes you frowne, And wherefore gaze this goodly company, As if they saw some wondrous monument, Some Commet, or vnusuall prodigie?
Bap. Why sir, you know this is your wedding day:
[1420]
First were we sad, fearing you would not come, Now sadder that you come so vnprouided: Fie, doff this habit, shame to your estate, An eye‑sore to our solemne festiuall.
Tra. And tell vs what occasion of import
[1425]
Hath all so long detain'd you from your wife, And sent you hither so vnlike your selfe?
Petr. Tedious it were to tell, and harsh to heare, Sufficeth I am come to keepe my word, Though in some part inforced to digresse,
[1430]
Which at more leysure I will so excuse, As you shall well be satisfied with all. But where is Kate? I stay too long from her, The morning weares, 'tis time we were at Church.
Tra. See not your Bride in these vnreuerent robes,
[1435]
Goe to my chamber, put on clothes of mine.
Pet. Not I, beleeue me, thus Ile visit her. Bap. But thus I trust you will not marry her. Pet. Good sooth euen thus: therefore ha done with (words, To me she's married, not vnto my cloathes:
[1440]
Could I repaire what she will weare in me, As I can change these poore accoutrements, 'Twere well for Kate, and better for my selfe. But what a foole am I to chat with you, When I should bid good morrow to my Bride?
[1445]
And seale the title with a louely kisse.
Exit. Tra. He hath some meaning in his mad attire, We will perswade him be it possible, To put on better ere he goe to Church. Bap. Ile after him, and see the euent of this. Exit. Tra.
[1450]
But sir, Loue concerneth vs to adde Her fathers liking, which to bring to passe As before imparted to your worship, I am to get a man what ere he be, It skills not much, weele fit him to our turne,
[1455]
And he shall be Vincentio of Pisa, And make assurance heere in Padua Of greater summes then I haue promised, So shall you quietly enioy your hope, And marry sweet Bianca with consent.
Luc.
[1460]
Were it not that my fellow schoolemaster Doth watch Bianca's steps so narrowly: 'Twere good me‑thinkes to steale our marriage, Which once perform'd, let all the world say no, Ile keepe mine owne despite of all the world.
Tra.
[1465]
That by degrees we meane to looke into, And watch our vantage in this businesse, Wee'll ouer‑reach the grey‑beard Gremio, The narrow prying father Minola, The quaint Musician, amorous Litio,
[1470]
All for my Masters sake Lucentio. Enter Gremio. Signior Gremio, came you from the Church?
Gre. As willingly as ere I came from schoole. Tra. And is the Bride & Bridegroom coming home? Gre. A bridegroome say you? 'Tis a groome indeed,
[1475]
A grumlling groome, and that the girle shall finde.
Tra. Curster then she, why 'tis impossible. Gre. Why hee's a deuill, a deuill, a very fiend. Tra. Why she's a deuill, a deuill, the deu ls damme. Gre. Tut, she's a Lambe, a Doue, a foole to him:
[1480]
Ile tell you sir Lucentio; when the Priest Should aske if Katherine should be his wife, I, by goggs woones quoth he, and swore so loud, That all amaz'd the Priest let fall the booke, And as he stoop'd againe to take it vp,
[1485]
This mad‑brain'd bridegroome tooke him such a cuffe, That downe fell Priest and booke, and booke and Priest, Now take them vp quoth he, if any list.
Tra. What said the wench when he rose againe ? Gre.

Trembled and shooke: for why, he stamp'd and

[1490]

swore, as if the Vicar meant to cozen him: but after ma­

ny ceremonies done, hee calls for wine, a health quoth

he, as if he had beene aboord carowsing to his Mates af­

ter a storme, quaft off the Muscadell, and threw the sops

all in the Sextons face: hauing no other reason, but that

[1495]

his beard grew thinne and hungerly, and seem'd to aske

him sops as hee was drinking: This done, hee tooke the

Bride about the necke, and kist her lips with such a cla­

morous smacke, that at the parting all the Church did

eccho: and I seeing this, came thence for very shame, and

[1500]

after mee I know the rout is comming, such a mad mar­

ryage neuer was before: harke, harke, I heare the min­

strels play.

Musicke playes. Enter Petruchio, Kate, Bianca, Hortensio, Baptista. Petr. Gentlemen & friends, I thank you for your pains, I know you thinke to dine with me to day,
[1505]
And haue prepar'd great store of wedding cheere, But so it is, my haste doth call me hence, And therefore heere I meane to take my leaue.
Bap. Is't possible you will away to night ? Pet. I must away to day before night come,
[1510]
Make it no wonder: if you knew my businesse, You would intreat me rather goe then stay: And honest company, I thanke you all, That haue beheld me giue away my selfe To this most patient, sweet, and vertuous wife,
[1515]
Dine with my father, drinke a health to me, For I must hence, and farewell to you all.
Tra. Let vs intreat you stay till after dinner. Pet. It may not be. Gra. Let me intreat you. Pet.
[1520]
It cannot be.
Kat. Let me intreat you. Pet. I am content. Kat. Are you content to stay? Pet. I am content you shall entreat me stay,
[1525]
But yet not stay, entreat me how you can.
Kat. Now if you loue me stay. Pet. Grumio, my horse. Gru.

I sir, they be ready, the Oates haue eaten the

horses.

Kate.
[1530]
Nay then, Doe what thou canst, I will not goe to day, No, nor to morrow, not till I please my selfe, The dore is open sir, there lies your way, You may be iogging whiles your bootes are greene:
[1535]
For me, Ile not be gone till I please my selfe, 'Tis like you'll proue a iolly surly groome, That take it on you at the first so roundly.
Pet. O Kate content thee, prethee be not angry. Kat. I will be angry, what hast thou to doe?
[1540]
Father, be quiet, he shall stay my leisure.
Gre. I marry sir, now it begins to worke. Kat. Gentlemen, forward to the bridall dinner, I see a woman may be made a foole If she had not a spirit to resist. Pet.
[1545]
They shall goe forward Kate at thy command, Obey the Bride you that attend on her. Goe to the feast, reuell and domineere, Carowse full measure to her maiden‑head, Be madde and merry, or goe hang your selues:
[1550]
But for my bonny Kate, she must with me: Nay, looke not big, nor stampe, not stare, nor fret, I will be master of what is mine owne, Shee is my goods, my chattels, she is my house, My houshold‑stuffe, my field, my barne,
[1555]
My horse, my oxe, my asse, my any thing, And heere she stands, touch her who euer dare, Ile bring mine action on the proudest he That stops my way in Padua: Grumio Draw forth thy weapon, we are beset with theeues,
[1560]
Rescue thy Mistresse if thou be a man: Feare not sweet wench, they shall not touch thee Kate, Ile buckler thee against a Million.
Exeunt. P. Ka. Bap. Nay, let them goe, a couple of quiet ones. Gre. Went they not quickly, I should die with laugh­ (ing. Tra.
[1565]
Of all mad matches neuer was the like.
Luc. Mistresse, what's your opinion of your sister? Bian. That being mad her selfe, she's madly mated. Gre. I warrant him Petruchio is Kated. Bap. Neighbours and friends, though Bride & Bride­ (groom wants
[1570]
For to supply the places at the table, You know there wants no iunkets at the feast: Lucentio, you shall supply the Bridegroomes place, And let Bianca take her sisters roome.
Tra. Shall sweet Bianca practise how to bride it? Bap.
[1575]
She shall Lucentio: come gentlemen lets goe.
Exeunt.
 

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<div type="scene" n="2" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 2]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Baptista, Gremio, Tranio, Katherine, Bianca, and o­
      <lb/>thers, attendants.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1331">Signior<hi rend="italic">Lucentio</hi>, this is the pointed day</l>
      <l n="1332">That<hi rend="italic">Katherine</hi>and<hi rend="italic">Petruchio</hi>should be married,</l>
      <l n="1333">And yet we heare not of our sonne in Law:</l>
      <l n="1334">What will be said, what mockery will it be?</l>
      <l n="1335">To want the Bride‑groome when the Priest attends</l>
      <l n="1336">To speake the ceremoniall rites of marriage?</l>
      <l n="1337">What saies<hi rend="italic">Lucentio</hi>to this shame of ours?</l>
   </sp>
   <pb facs="FFimg:axc0239-0.jpg" n="219"/>
   <cb n="1"/>
   <sp who="#F-shr-kat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Kate.</speaker>
      <l n="1338">No shame but mine, I must forsooth be forst</l>
      <l n="1339">To giue my hand oppos'd against my heart</l>
      <l n="1340">Vnto a mad‑braine rudesby, full of spleene,</l>
      <l n="1341">Who woo'd in haste, and meanes to wed at leysure:</l>
      <l n="1342">I told you I, he was a franticke foole,</l>
      <l n="1343">Hiding his bitter iests in blunt behauiour,</l>
      <l n="1344">And to be noted for a merry man;</l>
      <l n="1345">Hee'll wooe a thousand, point the day of marriage,</l>
      <l n="1346">Make friends, inuite, and proclaime the banes,</l>
      <l n="1347">Yet neuer meanes to wed where he hath woo'd:</l>
      <l n="1348">Now must the world point at poore<hi rend="italic">Katherine</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1349">And say, loe, there is mad<hi rend="italic">Petruchio</hi>'s wife</l>
      <l n="1350">If it would please him come and marry her.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1351">Patience good<hi rend="italic">Katherine</hi>and<hi rend="italic">Baptista</hi>too,</l>
      <l n="1352">Vpon my life<hi rend="italic">Petruchio</hi>meanes but well,</l>
      <l n="1353">What euer fortune stayes him from his word,</l>
      <l n="1354">Though he be blunt, I know him passing wise,</l>
      <l n="1355">Though he be merry, yet withall he's honest.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-kat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Kate.</speaker>
      <l n="1356">Would<hi rend="italic">Katherine</hi>had neuer seen him though.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit weeping.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1357">Goe girle, I cannot blame thee now to weepe,</l>
      <l n="1358">For such an iniurie would vexe a very saint,</l>
      <l n="1359">Much more a shrew of impatient humour.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Biondello.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <p n="1360">Master, master, newes, and such newes as you
      <lb n="1361"/>neuer heard of,</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1362">Is it new and olde too? how may that be?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <l n="1363">Why, is it not newes to heard of<hi rend="italic">Petruchio's</hi>
         
      <lb rend="turnunder"/>
         <pc rend="turnunder">(</pc>comming?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1364">Is he come?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <l n="1365">Why no sir.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1366">What then?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <l n="1367">He is comming.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1368">When will he be heere<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <l n="1369">When he stands where I am, and sees you there.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1370">But say, what to thine olde newes?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <p n="1371">Why<hi rend="italic">Petruchio</hi>is comming, in a new hat and
      <lb n="1372"/>an old ierkin, a paire of old breeches thrice turn'd; a
      <lb n="1373"/>paire of bootes that haue beene candle­cases, one buck­
      <lb n="1374"/>led, another lac'd: an olde rusty sword tane out of the
      <lb n="1375"/>Towne Armory, with a broken hilt, and chapelesse: with
      <lb n="1376"/>two broken points: his horse hip'd with an olde mo­
      <lb n="1377"/>thy saddle, and stirrops of no kindred: besides possest
      <lb n="1378"/>with the glanders, and like to mose in the chine, trou­
      <lb n="1379"/>bled with the Lampasse, infected with the fashions, full
      <lb n="1380"/>of Windegalls, sped with Spauins, raied with the Yel­
      <lb n="1381"/>lowes, past cure of the Fiues, starke spoyl'd with the
      <lb n="1382"/>Staggers, begnawne with the Bots, Waid in the backe,
      <lb n="1383"/>and shoulder‑shotten, neere leg'd before, and with a
      <lb n="1384"/>halfe‑chekt Bitte, &amp; a headstall of sheepes leather, which
      <lb n="1385"/>being restrain'd to keepe him from stumbling, hath been
      <lb n="1386"/>often burst, and now repaired with knots: one girth sixe
      <lb n="1387"/>times peec'd, and a womans Crupper of velure, which
      <lb n="1388"/>hath two letters for her name, fairely set down in studs,
      <lb n="1389"/>and heere and there peec'd with packthred.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1390">Who comes with him?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <p n="1391">Oh sir, his Lackey, for all the world Capari­
      <lb n="1392"/>soned like the horse: with a linnen stock on one leg, and
      <lb n="1393"/>a kersey boot‑hose on the other, gartred with a red and
      <lb n="1394"/>blew list; an old hat, &amp; the humor of forty fancies prickt
      <lb n="1395"/>in't for a feather: a monster, a very monster in apparell,
      <lb n="1396"/>&amp; not like a Christian foot‑boy, or a gentlemans Lacky.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1397">'Tis some od humor pricks him to this fashion,</l>
      <l n="1398">Yet oftentimes he goes but meane apparel'd.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1399">I am glad he's come, howsoere he comes.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <l n="1400">Why sir, he comes not.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1401">Didst thou not say hee comes?</l>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <l n="1402">Who, that<hi rend="italic">Petruchio</hi>came?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1403">I, that<hi rend="italic">Petruchio</hi>came.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <l n="1404">No sir, I say his horse comes with him on his
      <lb rend="turnover"/>
         <pc rend="turnover">(</pc>backe.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1405">Why that's all one.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bio">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bion.</speaker>
      <p n="1406">Nay by<choice>
            <abbr>S.</abbr>
            <expan>Saint</expan>
         </choice>
         <hi rend="italic">Iamy</hi>, I hold you a penny, a horse and
      <lb n="1407"/>a man is more then one, and yet not many.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Petruchio and Grumio.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1408">Come, where be these gallants? who's at home?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1409">You are welcome sir.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Petr.</speaker>
      <l n="1410">And yet I come not well.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1411">And yet you halt not.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1412">Not so well apparell'd as I wish you were.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Petr.</speaker>
      <l n="1413">Were it better I should rush in thus:</l>
      <l n="1414">But where is<hi rend="italic">Kate</hi>? where is my louely Bride?</l>
      <l n="1415">How does my father? gentles methinkes you frowne,</l>
      <l n="1416">And wherefore gaze this goodly company,</l>
      <l n="1417">As if they saw some wondrous monument,</l>
      <l n="1418">Some Commet, or vnusuall prodigie?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1419">Why sir, you know this is your wedding day:</l>
      <l n="1420">First were we sad, fearing you would not come,</l>
      <l n="1421">Now sadder that you come so vnprouided:</l>
      <l n="1422">Fie, doff this habit, shame to your estate,</l>
      <l n="1423">An eye‑sore to our solemne festiuall.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1424">And tell vs what occasion of import</l>
      <l n="1425">Hath all so long detain'd you from your wife,</l>
      <l n="1426">And sent you hither so vnlike your selfe?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Petr.</speaker>
      <l n="1427">Tedious it were to tell, and harsh to heare,</l>
      <l n="1428">Sufficeth I am come to keepe my word,</l>
      <l n="1429">Though in some part inforced to digresse,</l>
      <l n="1430">Which at more leysure I will so excuse,</l>
      <l n="1431">As you shall well be satisfied with all.</l>
      <l n="1432">But where is<hi rend="italic">Kate</hi>? I stay too long from her,</l>
      <l n="1433">The morning weares, 'tis time we were at Church.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1434">See not your Bride in these vnreuerent robes,</l>
      <l n="1435">Goe to my chamber, put on clothes of mine.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1436">Not I, beleeue me, thus Ile visit her.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1437">But thus I trust you will not marry her.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1438">Good sooth euen thus: therefore ha done with
      <lb rend="turnover"/>
         <pc rend="turnover">(</pc>words,</l>
      <l n="1439">To me she's married, not vnto my cloathes:</l>
      <l n="1440">Could I repaire what she will weare in me,</l>
      <l n="1441">As I can change these poore accoutrements,</l>
      <l n="1442">'Twere well for<hi rend="italic">Kate</hi>, and better for my selfe.</l>
      <l n="1443">But what a foole am I to chat with you,</l>
      <l n="1444">When I should bid good morrow to my Bride?</l>
      <l n="1445">And seale the title with a louely kisse.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1446">He hath some meaning in his mad attire,</l>
      <l n="1447">We will perswade him be it possible,</l>
      <l n="1448">To put on better ere he goe to Church.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1449">Ile after him, and see the euent of this.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1450">But sir, Loue concerneth vs to adde</l>
      <l n="1451">Her fathers liking, which to bring to passe</l>
      <l n="1452">As before imparted to your worship,</l>
      <l n="1453">I am to get a man what ere he be,</l>
      <l n="1454">It skills not much, weele fit him to our turne,</l>
      <l n="1455">And he shall be<hi rend="italic">Vincentio</hi>of<hi rend="italic">Pisa</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1456">And make assurance heere in<hi rend="italic">Padua</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="1457">Of greater summes then I haue promised,</l>
      <l n="1458">So shall you quietly enioy your hope,</l>
      <l n="1459">And marry sweet<hi rend="italic">Bianca</hi>with consent.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luc.</speaker>
      <l n="1460">Were it not that my fellow schoolemaster</l>
      <l n="1461">Doth watch<hi rend="italic">Bianca</hi>'s steps so narrowly:</l>
      <l n="1462">'Twere good me‑thinkes to steale our marriage,</l>
      <l n="1463">Which once perform'd, let all the world say no,</l>
      <l n="1464">Ile keepe mine owne despite of all the world.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1465">That by degrees we meane to looke into,</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0240-0.jpg" n="220"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="1466">And watch our vantage in this businesse,</l>
      <l n="1467">Wee'll ouer‑reach the grey‑beard<hi rend="italic">Gremio</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1468">The narrow prying father<hi rend="italic">Minola</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1469">The quaint Musician, amorous<hi rend="italic">Litio</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1470">All for my Masters sake<hi rend="italic">Lucentio</hi>.</l>
      <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Gremio.</stage>
      <l n="1471">Signior<hi rend="italic">Gremio</hi>, came you from the Church?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gre.</speaker>
      <l n="1472">As willingly as ere I came from schoole.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1473">And is the Bride &amp; Bridegroom coming home?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gre.</speaker>
      <l n="1474">A bridegroome say you? 'Tis a groome indeed,</l>
      <l n="1475">A grumlling groome, and that the girle shall finde.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1476">Curster then she, why 'tis impossible.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gre.</speaker>
      <l n="1477">Why hee's a deuill, a deuill, a very fiend.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1478">Why she's a deuill, a deuill, the deu<gap extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              reason="illegible"
              agent="uninkedType"
              resp="#ES"/>ls damme.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gre.</speaker>
      <l n="1479">Tut, she's a Lambe, a Doue, a foole to him:</l>
      <l n="1480">Ile tell you sir<hi rend="italic">Lucentio</hi>; when the Priest</l>
      <l n="1481">Should aske if<hi rend="italic">Katherine</hi>should be his wife,</l>
      <l n="1482">I, by goggs woones quoth he, and swore so loud,</l>
      <l n="1483">That all amaz'd the Priest let fall the booke,</l>
      <l n="1484">And as he stoop'd againe to take it vp,</l>
      <l n="1485">This mad‑brain'd bridegroome tooke him such a cuffe,</l>
      <l n="1486">That downe fell Priest and booke, and booke and Priest,</l>
      <l n="1487">Now take them vp quoth he, if any list.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1488">What said the wench when he rose againe<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gre.</speaker>
      <p n="1489">Trembled and shooke: for why, he stamp'd and
      <lb n="1490"/>swore, as if the Vicar meant to cozen him: but after ma­
      <lb n="1491"/>ny ceremonies done, hee calls for wine, a health quoth
      <lb n="1492"/>he, as if he had beene aboord carowsing to his Mates af­
      <lb n="1493"/>ter a storme, quaft off the Muscadell, and threw the sops
      <lb n="1494"/>all in the Sextons face: hauing no other reason, but that
      <lb n="1495"/>his beard grew thinne and hungerly, and seem'd to aske
      <lb n="1496"/>him sops as hee was drinking: This done, hee tooke the
      <lb n="1497"/>Bride about the necke, and kist her lips with such a cla­
      <lb n="1498"/>morous smacke, that at the parting all the Church did
      <lb n="1499"/>eccho: and I seeing this, came thence for very shame, and
      <lb n="1500"/>after mee I know the rout is comming, such a mad mar­
      <lb n="1501"/>ryage neuer was before: harke, harke, I heare the min­
      <lb n="1502"/>strels play.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="business">Musicke playes.</stage>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Petruchio, Kate, Bianca, Hortensio, Baptista.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Petr.</speaker>
      <l n="1503">Gentlemen &amp; friends, I thank you for your pains,</l>
      <l n="1504">I know you thinke to dine with me to day,</l>
      <l n="1505">And haue prepar'd great store of wedding cheere,</l>
      <l n="1506">But so it is, my haste doth call me hence,</l>
      <l n="1507">And therefore heere I meane to take my leaue.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1508">Is't possible you will away to night<c rend="italic">?</c>
      </l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1509">I must away to day before night come,</l>
      <l n="1510">Make it no wonder: if you knew my businesse,</l>
      <l n="1511">You would intreat me rather goe then stay:</l>
      <l n="1512">And honest company, I thanke you all,</l>
      <l n="1513">That haue beheld me giue away my selfe</l>
      <l n="1514">To this most patient, sweet, and vertuous wife,</l>
      <l n="1515">Dine with my father, drinke a health to me,</l>
      <l n="1516">For I must hence, and farewell to you all.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1517">Let vs intreat you stay till after dinner.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1518">It may not be.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gra.</speaker>
      <l n="1519">Let me intreat you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1520">It cannot be.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-kat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Kat.</speaker>
      <l n="1521">Let me intreat you.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1522">I am content.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-kat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Kat.</speaker>
      <l n="1523">Are you content to stay?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1524">I am content you shall entreat me stay,</l>
      <l n="1525">But yet not stay, entreat me how you can.</l>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-shr-kat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Kat.</speaker>
      <l n="1526">Now if you loue me stay.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1527">
         <hi rend="italic">Grumio</hi>, my horse.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gru">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gru.</speaker>
      <p n="1528">I sir, they be ready, the Oates haue eaten the
      <lb n="1529"/>horses.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-kat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Kate.</speaker>
      <l n="1530">Nay then,</l>
      <l n="1531">Doe what thou canst, I will not goe to day,</l>
      <l n="1532">No, nor to morrow, not till I please my selfe,</l>
      <l n="1533">The dore is open sir, there lies your way,</l>
      <l n="1534">You may be iogging whiles your bootes are greene:</l>
      <l n="1535">For me, Ile not be gone till I please my selfe,</l>
      <l n="1536">'Tis like you'll proue a iolly surly groome,</l>
      <l n="1537">That take it on you at the first so roundly.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1538">O<hi rend="italic">Kate</hi>content thee, prethee be not angry.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-kat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Kat.</speaker>
      <l n="1539">I will be angry, what hast thou to doe?</l>
      <l n="1540">Father, be quiet, he shall stay my leisure.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gre.</speaker>
      <l n="1541">I marry sir, now it begins to worke.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-kat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Kat.</speaker>
      <l n="1542">Gentlemen, forward to the bridall dinner,</l>
      <l n="1543">I see a woman may be made a foole</l>
      <l n="1544">If she had not a spirit to resist.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-ptr">
      <speaker rend="italic">Pet.</speaker>
      <l n="1545">They shall goe forward<hi rend="italic">Kate</hi>at thy command,</l>
      <l n="1546">Obey the Bride you that attend on her.</l>
      <l n="1547">Goe to the feast, reuell and domineere,</l>
      <l n="1548">Carowse full measure to her maiden‑head,</l>
      <l n="1549">Be madde and merry, or goe hang your selues:</l>
      <l n="1550">But for my bonny<hi rend="italic">Kate</hi>, she must with me:</l>
      <l n="1551">Nay, looke not big, nor stampe, not stare, nor fret,</l>
      <l n="1552">I will be master of what is mine owne,</l>
      <l n="1553">Shee is my goods, my chattels, she is my house,</l>
      <l n="1554">My houshold‑stuffe, my field, my barne,</l>
      <l n="1555">My horse, my oxe, my asse, my any thing,</l>
      <l n="1556">And heere she stands, touch her who euer dare,</l>
      <l n="1557">Ile bring mine action on the proudest he</l>
      <l n="1558">That stops my way in<hi rend="italic">Padua</hi>:<hi rend="italic">Grumio</hi>
      </l>
      <l n="1559">Draw forth thy weapon, we are beset with theeues,</l>
      <l n="1560">Rescue thy Mistresse if thou be a man:</l>
      <l n="1561">Feare not sweet wench, they shall not touch thee<hi rend="italic">Kate</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1562">Ile buckler thee against a Million.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt. P. Ka.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1563">Nay, let them goe, a couple of quiet ones.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gre.</speaker>
      <l n="1564">Went they not quickly, I should die with laugh­
      <lb rend="turnover"/>
         <pc rend="turnover">(</pc>ing.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1565">Of all mad matches neuer was the like.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-luc">
      <speaker rend="italic">Luc.</speaker>
      <l n="1566">Mistresse, what's your opinion of your sister?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bia">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bian.</speaker>
      <l n="1567">That being mad her selfe, she's madly mated.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-gre">
      <speaker rend="italic">Gre.</speaker>
      <l n="1568">I warrant him<hi rend="italic">Petruchio</hi>is Kated.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1569">Neighbours and friends, though Bride &amp; Bride­
      <lb rend="turnunder"/>
         <pc rend="turnunder">(</pc>groom wants</l>
      <l n="1570">For to supply the places at the table,</l>
      <l n="1571">You know there wants no iunkets at the feast:</l>
      <l n="1572">
         <hi rend="italic">Lucentio</hi>, you shall supply the Bridegroomes place,</l>
      <l n="1573">And let<hi rend="italic">Bianca</hi>take her sisters roome.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-tra">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tra.</speaker>
      <l n="1574">Shall sweet<hi rend="italic">Bianca</hi>practise how to bride it?</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-shr-bap">
      <speaker rend="italic">Bap.</speaker>
      <l n="1575">She shall<hi rend="italic">Lucentio</hi>: come gentlemen lets goe.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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