The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: dd5v - Tragedies, p. 46

Left Column


The Lamentable Tragedie of Titus Andronicus.
[1780]
'Tis you must dig with Mattocke, and with Spade, And pierce the inmost Center of the earth: Then when you come to Plutoes Region, I pray you deliuer him this petition, Tell him it is for iustice, and for aide,
[1785]
And that it comes from old Andronicus, Shaken with sorrowes in vngratefull Rome. Ah Rome! Well, well, I made thee miserable, What time I threw the peoples suffrages On him that thus doth tyrannize ore me.
[1790]
Goe get you gone, and pray be carefull all, And leaue you not a man of warre vnsearcht, This wicked Emperour may haue shipt her hence, And kinsmen then we may goe pipe for iustice.
Marc. O Publius is not this a heauie case
[1795]
To see thy Noble Vnckle thus distract?
Publ. Therefore my Lords it highly vs concernes, By day and night t' attend him carefully: And feede his humour kindely as we may, Till time beget some carefull remedie. Marc.
[1800]
Kinsmen, his sorrowes are past remedie. Ioyne with the Gothes, and with reuengefull warre, Take wreake on Rome for this ingratitude, And vengeance on the Traytor Saturnine.
Tit. Publius how now? how now my Maisters?
[1805]
What haue you met with her?
Publ. No my good Lord, but Pluto sends you word, If you will haue reuenge from hell you shall, Marrie for iustice she is so imploy'd, He thinkes with Ioue in heauen, or some where else:
[1810]
So that perforce you must needs stay a time.
Tit. He doth me wrong to feed me with delayes, Ile diue into the burning Lake below, And pull her out of Acaron by the heeles. Marcus we are but shrubs, no Cedars we,
[1815]
No big‑bon'd‑men, fram'd of the Cyclops size, But mettall Marcus steele to the very backe, Yet wrung with wrongs more then our backe can beare: And sith there's no iustice in earth nor hell, We will sollicite heauen, and moue the Gods
[1820]
To send downe Iustice for to wreake our wongs wrongs : Come to this geare, you are a good Archer Marcus. He giues them the Arrowes. Ad Iouem, that's for you: here ad Appollonem, Ad Martem, that's for my selfe, Heere Boy to Pallas, heere to Mercury,
[1825]
To Saturnine, to Caius, not to Saturnine, You were as good to shoote against the winde. Too it Boy, Marcus loose when I bid: Of my word, I haue written to effect, Ther's not a God left vnsollicited.
Marc.
[1830]
Kinsmen, shoot all your shafts into the Court, We will afflict the Emperour in his pride.
Tit. Now Maisters draw, Oh well said Lucius: Good Boy in Virgoes lap, giue it Pallas. Marc. My Lord, I aime a Mile beyond the Moone,
[1835]
Your letter is with Iupiter by this.
Tit. Ha, ha, Publius, Publius, what hast thou done? See, see, thou hast shot off one of Taurus hornes. Mar. This was the sport my Lord, when Publius shot, The Bull being gal'd, gaue Aries such a knocke,
[1840]
That downe fell both the Rams hornes in the Court, And who should finde them but the Empresse villaine: She laught, and told the Moore he should not choose But giue them to his Maister for a present.
Tit.

Why there it goes, God giue your Lordship ioy.

Enter the Clowne with a basket and two Pigeons in it. Titus.
[1845]
Newes, newes, from heauen, Marcus the poast is come. Sirrah, what tydings? haue you any letters? Shall I haue Iustice, what sayes Iupiter?
Clowne.

Ho the Iibbetmaker, he sayes that he hath ta­

[1850]

ken them downe againe, for the man must not be hang'd

till the next weeke.

Tit.

But what sayes Iupiter I aske thee?

Clowne. Alas sir I know not Iupiter: I neuer dranke with him in all my life. Tit.
[1855]

Why villaine art not thou the Carrier?

Clowne.

I of my Pigions sir, nothing else.

Tit.

Why, did'st thou not come from heauen?

Clowne. From heauen? Alas sir, I neuer came there, God forbid I should be so bold, to presse to heauen in my
[1860]
young dayes. Why I am going with my pigeons to the Tribunall Plebs, to take vp a matter of brawle, betwixt my Vncle, and one of the Emperialls men.
Mar. Why sir, that is as fit as can be to serue for your Oration, and let him deliuer the Pigions to the Emperour from you. Tit.
[1865]
Tell mee, can you deliuer an Oration to the Em­ perour with a Grace?
Clowne.

Nay truely sir, I could neuer say grace in all

my life.

Tit. Sirrah come hither, make no more adoe, But giue your Pigeons to the Emperour,
[1870]
By me thou shalt haue Iustice at his hands. Hold, hold, meane while her's money for thy charges. Giue me pen and inke. Sirrah, can you with a Grace deliuer a Supplication?
Clowne.

I sir

Titus.
[1875]

Then here is a Supplication for you, and when

you come to him, at the first approach you must kneele,

then kisse his foote, then deliuer vp your Pigeons, and

then looke for your reward. Ile be at hand sir, see you do

it brauely.

Clowne.
[1880]

I warrant you sir, let me alone.

Tit. Sirrha hast thou a knife? Come let me see it. Heere Marcus, fold it in the Oration, For thou hast made it like an humble Suppliant: And when thou hast giuen it the Emperour,
[1885]
Knocke at my dore, and tell me what he sayes.
Clowne.

God be with you sir, I will.

Exit. Tit.

Come Marcus let vs goe, Publius follow me.

Exeunt.
[Act 4, Scene 4] Enter Emperour and Empresse, and her two sonnes, the Emperour brings the Arrowes in his hand that Titus shot at him. Satur. Why Lords, What wrongs are these? was euer seene An Emperour in Rome thus ouerborne,
[1890]
Troubled, Confronted thus, and for the extent Of eg all iustice, vs'd in such contempt? My Lords, you know the mightfull Gods, (How euer these disturbers of our peace Buz in the peoples eares) there nought hath past,
[1895]
But euen with law against the willfull Sonnes Of old Andronicus. And what and if His sorrowes haue so ouerwhelm'd his wits, Shall we be thus afflicted in his wreakes, His fits, his frenzie, and his bitternesse?
[1900]
And now he writes to heauen for his redresse. See, heeres to Ioue, and this to Mercury, This

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[Act 4, Scene 4] Enter Emperour and Empresse, and her two sonnes, the Emperour brings the Arrowes in his hand that Titus shot at him. Satur. Why Lords, What wrongs are these? was euer seene An Emperour in Rome thus ouerborne,
[1890]
Troubled, Confronted thus, and for the extent Of eg all iustice, vs'd in such contempt? My Lords, you know the mightfull Gods, (How euer these disturbers of our peace Buz in the peoples eares) there nought hath past,
[1895]
But euen with law against the willfull Sonnes Of old Andronicus. And what and if His sorrowes haue so ouerwhelm'd his wits, Shall we be thus afflicted in his wreakes, His fits, his frenzie, and his bitternesse?
[1900]
And now he writes to heauen for his redresse. See, heeres to Ioue, and this to Mercury, This to Apollo, this to the God of warre: Sweet scrowles to flie about the streets of Rome: What's this but Libelling against the Senate,
[1905]
And blazoning our Iniustice euery where? A goodly humour, is it not my Lords? As who would say, in Rome no Iustice were. But if I liue, his fained extasies Shall be no shelter to these outrages:
[1910]
But he and his shall know, that Iustice liues In Saturninus health; whom if he sleepe, Hee'l so awake, as he in fury shall Cut off the proud'st Conspirator that liues.
Tamo. My gracious Lord, my louely Saturnine,
[1915]
Lord of my life, Commander of my thoughts, Calme thee, and beare the faults of Titus age, Th' effects of sorrow for his valiant Sonnes, Whose losse hath pier'st him deepe, and scar'd his heart; And rather comfort his distressed plight,
[1920]
Then prosecute the meanest or the best For these contempts. Why thus it shall become High witted Tamora to glose with all: Aside. But Titus, I haue touch'd thee to the quicke, Thy life blood out: If Aaron now be wise,
[1925]
Then is all safe, the Anchor's in the Port.
Enter Clowne.

How now good fellow, would'st thou speake with vs?

Clow.

Yea forsooth, and your Mistership be Emperiall.

Tam.

Empresse I am, but yonder sits the Emperour.

Clo. 'Tis he; God & Saint Stephen giue you good den; I haue brought you a Letter, & a couple of Pigions heere. He reads the Letter. Satu.
[1930]

Goe take him away, and hang him presently.

Clowne.

How much money must I haue?

Tam.

Come sirrah you must be hang'd.

Clow.

Hang'd? ber Lady, then I haue brought vp a neck

to a faire end.

Exit. Satu.
[1935]
Despightfull and intollerable wrongs, Shall I endure this monstrous villany? I know from whence this same deuise proceedes: May this be borne? As if his traytrous Sonnes, That dy'd by law for murther of our Brother,
[1940]
Haue by my meanes beene butcher'd wrongfully? Goe dragge the villaine hither by the haire, Nor Age, nor Honour, shall shape priuiledge: For this proud mocke, Ile be thy slaughter man: Sly franticke wretch, that holp'st to make me great,
[1945]
In hope thy selfe should gouerne Rome and me.
Enter Nuntius Emillius. Satur.

What newes with thee Emillius?

Emil. Arme my Lords, Rome neuer had more cause, The Gothes haue gather'd head, and with a power Of high resolued men, bent to the spoyle
[1950]
They hither march amaine, vnder conduct Of Lucius, Sonne to old Andronicus: Who threats in course of this reuenge to do As much as euer Coriolanus did.
King. Is warlike Lucius Generall of the Gothes?
[1955]
These tydings nip me, and I hang the head As flowers with frost, or grasse beat downe with stormes: I, now begins our sorrowes to approach, 'Tis he the common people loue so much, My selfe hath often heard them say,
[1960]
(When I haue walked like a priuate man) That Lucius banishment was wrongfully, And they haue wisht that Lucius were their Emperour.
Tam.

Why should you feare? Is not our City strong?

King. I, but the Cittizens fauour Lucius,
[1965]
And will reuolt from me, to succour him.
Tam. King, be thy thoughts Imperious like thy name. Is the Sunne dim'd, that Gnats do flie in it? The Eagle suffers little Birds to sing, And is not carefull what they meane thereby,
[1970]
Knowing that with the shadow of his wings, He can at pleasure stint their melodie. Euen so mayest thou, the giddy men of Rome, Then cheare thy spirit, for know thou Emperour, I will enchaunt the old Andronicus,
[1975]
With words more sweet, and yet more dangerous Then baites to fish, or hony stalkes to sheepe, When as the one is wounded with the baite, The other rotted with delicious foode.
King.

But he will not entreat his Sonne for vs.

Tam.
[1980]
If Tamora entreat him, then he will, For I can smooth and fill his aged eare, With golden promises, that were his heart Almost Impregnable, his old eares deafe, Yet should both eare and heart obey my tongue.
[1985]
Goe thou before to our Embassadour, Say, that the Emperour requests a parly Of warlike Lucius, and appoint the meeting.
King. Emillius do this message Honourably, And if he stand in Hostage for his safety,
[1990]
Bid him demaund what pledge will please him best.
Emill.

Your bidding shall I do effectually.

Exit. Tam. Now will I to that old Andronicus, And temper him with all the Art I haue, To plucke proud Lucius from the warlike Gothes.
[1995]
And now sweet Emperour be blithe againe, And bury all thy feare in my deuises.
Satu.

Then goe successantly and plead for him.

Exit.
 

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<div type="scene" n="4" rend="notPresent">
   <head type="supplied">[Act 4, Scene 4]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Emperour and Empresse, and her two sonnes, the
      <lb/>Emperour brings the Arrowes in his hand
      <lb/>that Titus shot at him.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tit-sat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Satur.</speaker>
      <l n="1888">Why Lords,
      <lb/>What wrongs are these? was euer seene</l>
      <l n="1889">An Emperour in Rome thus ouerborne,</l>
      <l n="1890">Troubled, Confronted thus, and for the extent</l>
      <l n="1891">Of eg all iustice, vs'd in such contempt?</l>
      <l n="1892">My Lords, you know the mightfull Gods,</l>
      <l n="1893">(How euer these disturbers of our peace</l>
      <l n="1894">Buz in the peoples eares) there nought hath past,</l>
      <l n="1895">But euen with law against the willfull Sonnes</l>
      <l n="1896">Of old<hi rend="italic">Andronicus</hi>. And what and if</l>
      <l n="1897">His sorrowes haue so ouerwhelm'd his wits,</l>
      <l n="1898">Shall we be thus afflicted in his wreakes,</l>
      <l n="1899">His fits, his frenzie, and his bitternesse?</l>
      <l n="1900">And now he writes to heauen for his redresse.</l>
      <l n="1901">See, heeres to<hi rend="italic">Ioue</hi>, and this to<hi rend="italic">Mercury</hi>,</l>
      <pb facs="FFimg:axc0665-0.jpg" n="47"/>
      <cb n="1"/>
      <l n="1902">This to<hi rend="italic">Apollo</hi>, this to the God of warre:</l>
      <l n="1903">Sweet scrowles to flie about the streets of Rome:</l>
      <l n="1904">What's this but Libelling against the Senate,</l>
      <l n="1905">And blazoning our Iniustice euery where?</l>
      <l n="1906">A goodly humour, is it not my Lords?</l>
      <l n="1907">As who would say, in Rome no Iustice were.</l>
      <l n="1908">But if I liue, his fained extasies</l>
      <l n="1909">Shall be no shelter to these outrages:</l>
      <l n="1910">But he and his shall know, that Iustice liues</l>
      <l n="1911">In<hi rend="italic">Saturninus</hi>health; whom if he sleepe,</l>
      <l n="1912">Hee'l so awake, as he in fury shall</l>
      <l n="1913">Cut off the proud'st Conspirator that liues.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-tam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tamo.</speaker>
      <l n="1914">My gracious Lord, my louely<hi rend="italic">Saturnine</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1915">Lord of my life, Commander of my thoughts,</l>
      <l n="1916">Calme thee, and beare the faults of<hi rend="italic">Titus</hi>age,</l>
      <l n="1917">Th' effects of sorrow for his valiant Sonnes,</l>
      <l n="1918">Whose losse hath pier'st him deepe, and scar'd his heart;</l>
      <l n="1919">And rather comfort his distressed plight,</l>
      <l n="1920">Then prosecute the meanest or the best</l>
      <l n="1921">For these contempts. Why thus it shall become</l>
      <l n="1922">High witted<hi rend="italic">Tamora</hi>to glose with all:</l>
      <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="business">Aside.</stage>
      <l n="1923">But<hi rend="italic">Titus</hi>, I haue touch'd thee to the quicke,</l>
      <l n="1924">Thy life blood out: If<hi rend="italic">Aaron</hi>now be wise,</l>
      <l n="1925">Then is all safe, the Anchor's in the Port.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Clowne.</stage>
   <p>How now good fellow, would'st thou speake with vs?</p>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clow.</speaker>
      <p n="1926">Yea forsooth, and your Mistership be Emperiall.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-tam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tam.</speaker>
      <p n="1927">Empresse I am, but yonder sits the Emperour.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <l n="1928">'Tis he; God &amp; Saint Stephen giue you good den;</l>
      <l n="1929">I haue brought you a Letter, &amp; a couple of Pigions heere.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="business">He reads the Letter.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tit-sat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Satu.</speaker>
      <p n="1930">Goe take him away, and hang him presently.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <p n="1931">How much money must I haue?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-tam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tam.</speaker>
      <p n="1932">Come sirrah you must be hang'd.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clow.</speaker>
      <p n="1933">Hang'd? ber Lady, then I haue brought vp a neck
      <lb n="1934"/>to a faire end.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tit-sat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Satu.</speaker>
      <l n="1935">Despightfull and intollerable wrongs,</l>
      <l n="1936">Shall I endure this monstrous villany?</l>
      <l n="1937">I know from whence this same deuise proceedes:</l>
      <l n="1938">May this be borne? As if his traytrous Sonnes,</l>
      <l n="1939">That dy'd by law for murther of our Brother,</l>
      <l n="1940">Haue by my meanes beene butcher'd wrongfully?</l>
      <l n="1941">Goe dragge the villaine hither by the haire,</l>
      <l n="1942">Nor Age, nor Honour, shall shape priuiledge:</l>
      <l n="1943">For this proud mocke, Ile be thy slaughter man:</l>
      <l n="1944">Sly franticke wretch, that holp'st to make me great,</l>
      <l n="1945">In hope thy selfe should gouerne Rome and me.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Nuntius Emillius.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tit-sat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Satur.</speaker>
      <p n="1946">What newes with thee<hi rend="italic">Emillius</hi>?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-aem">
      <speaker rend="italic">Emil.</speaker>
      <l n="1947">Arme my Lords, Rome neuer had more cause,</l>
      <l n="1948">The Gothes haue gather'd head, and with a power</l>
      <l n="1949">Of high resolued men, bent to the spoyle</l>
      <l n="1950">They hither march amaine, vnder conduct</l>
      <l n="1951">Of<hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>, Sonne to old<hi rend="italic">Andronicus</hi>:</l>
      <l n="1952">Who threats in course of this reuenge to do</l>
      <l n="1953">As much as euer<hi rend="italic">Coriolanus</hi>did.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-lav">
      <speaker rend="italic">King.</speaker>
      <l n="1954">Is warlike<hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>Generall of the Gothes?</l>
      <l n="1955">These tydings nip me, and I hang the head</l>
      <l n="1956">As flowers with frost, or grasse beat downe with stormes:</l>
      <l n="1957">I, now begins our sorrowes to approach,</l>
      <l n="1958">'Tis he the common people loue so much,</l>
      <l n="1959">My selfe hath often heard them say,</l>
      <l n="1960">(When I haue walked like a priuate man)</l>
      <l n="1961">That<hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>banishment was wrongfully,</l>
      <l n="1962">And they haue wisht that<hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>were their Emperour.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-tam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tam.</speaker>
      <p n="1963">Why should you feare? Is not our City strong?</p>
   </sp>
   <cb n="2"/>
   <sp who="#F-tit-lav">
      <speaker rend="italic">King.</speaker>
      <l n="1964">I, but the Cittizens fauour<hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1965">And will reuolt from me, to succour him.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-tam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tam.</speaker>
      <l n="1966">
         <hi rend="italic">King</hi>, be thy thoughts Imperious like thy name.</l>
      <l n="1967">Is the Sunne dim'd, that Gnats do flie in it?</l>
      <l n="1968">The Eagle suffers little Birds to sing,</l>
      <l n="1969">And is not carefull what they meane thereby,</l>
      <l n="1970">Knowing that with the shadow of his wings,</l>
      <l n="1971">He can at pleasure stint their melodie.</l>
      <l n="1972">Euen so mayest thou, the giddy men of Rome,</l>
      <l n="1973">Then cheare thy spirit, for know thou Emperour,</l>
      <l n="1974">I will enchaunt the old<hi rend="italic">Andronicus</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1975">With words more sweet, and yet more dangerous</l>
      <l n="1976">Then baites to fish, or hony stalkes to sheepe,</l>
      <l n="1977">When as the one is wounded with the baite,</l>
      <l n="1978">The other rotted with delicious foode.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-lav">
      <speaker rend="italic">King.</speaker>
      <p n="1979">But he will not entreat his Sonne for vs.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-tam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tam.</speaker>
      <l n="1980">If<hi rend="italic">Tamora</hi>entreat him, then he will,</l>
      <l n="1981">For I can smooth and fill his aged eare,</l>
      <l n="1982">With golden promises, that were his heart</l>
      <l n="1983">Almost Impregnable, his old eares deafe,</l>
      <l n="1984">Yet should both eare and heart obey my tongue.</l>
      <l n="1985">Goe thou before to our Embassadour,</l>
      <l n="1986">Say, that the Emperour requests a parly</l>
      <l n="1987">Of warlike<hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>, and appoint the meeting.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-lav">
      <speaker rend="italic">King.</speaker>
      <l n="1988">
         <hi rend="italic">Emillius</hi>do this message Honourably,</l>
      <l n="1989">And if he stand in Hostage for his safety,</l>
      <l n="1990">Bid him demaund what pledge will please him best.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-aem">
      <speaker rend="italic">Emill.</speaker>
      <p n="1991">Your bidding shall I do effectually.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-tit-tam">
      <speaker rend="italic">Tam.</speaker>
      <l n="1992">Now will I to that old<hi rend="italic">Andronicus</hi>,</l>
      <l n="1993">And temper him with all the Art I haue,</l>
      <l n="1994">To plucke proud<hi rend="italic">Lucius</hi>from the warlike Gothes.</l>
      <l n="1995">And now sweet Emperour be blithe againe,</l>
      <l n="1996">And bury all thy feare in my deuises.</l>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-tit-sat">
      <speaker rend="italic">Satu.</speaker>
      <p n="1997">Then goe successantly and plead for him.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
</div>

        
        

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