The Bodleian First Folio

A digital facsimile of the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays, Bodleian Arch. G c.7.



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Reference: 2A6v - Comedies, p. 288

Left Column


The Winters Tale. The sweet’st, deer’st creature’s dead: & vengeance for’t
[1370]
Not drop’d downe yet.
Lord.

The higher powres forbid.

Pau. I say she’s dead: Ile swear’t. If word, nor oath Preuaile not, go and see: if you can bring Tincture, or lustre in her lip, her eye
[1375]
Heate outwardly, or breath within, Ile serue you As I would do the Gods. But, O thou Tyrant, Do not repent these things, for they are heauier Then all thy woes can stirre: therefore betake thee To nothing but dispaire. A thousand knees,
[1380]
Ten thousand yeares together, naked, fasting, Vpon a barren Mountaine, and still Winter In storme perpetuall, could not moue the Gods To looke that way thou wer’t.
Leo. Go on, go on:
[1385]
Thou canst not speake too much, I haue deseru’d All tongues to talke their bittrest.
Lord. Say no more; How ere the businesse goes, you haue made fault I’th boldnesse of your speech. Pau.
[1390]
I am sorry for’t; All faults I make, when I shall come to know them, I do repent: Alas, I haue shew’d too much The rashnesse of a woman: he is toucht To th’Noble heart. What’s gone, and what’s past helpe
[1395]
Should be past greefe: Do not receiue affliction At my petition; I beseech you, rather Let me be punish’d, that haue minded you Of what you should forget. Now (good my Liege) Sir, Royall Sir, forgiue a foolish woman:
[1400]
The loue I bore your Queene (Lo, foole againe) Ile speake of her no more, nor of your Children: Ile not remember you of my owne Lord, (Who is lost too:) take your patience to you, And Ile say nothing.
Leo.
[1405]
Thou didst speake but well, When most the truth: which I receyue much better, Then to be pittied of thee. Prethee bring me To the dead bodies of my Queene, and Sonne, One graue shall be for both: Vpon them shall
[1410]
The causes of their death appeare (vnto Our shame perpetuall) once a day, Ile visit The Chappell where they lye, and teares shed there Shall be my recreation. So long as Nature Will beare vp with this exercise, so long
[1415]
I dayly vow to vse it. Come, and leade me To these sorrowes.
Exeunt
Scæna Tertia. [Act 3, Scene 3] Enter Antigonus, a Marriner, Babe, Sheepe­ heard, and Clowne. Ant. Thou art perfect then, our ship hath toucht vpon, The Desarts of Bohemia. Mar. I (my Lord) and feare
[1420]
We haue Landed in ill time: the skies looke grimly, And threaten present blusters. In my conscience The heauens with that we haue in hand, are angry, And frowne vpon’s.
Ant. Their sacred wil’s be done: go get a-boord,
[1425]
Looke to thy barke, Ile not be long before

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Right Column


I call vpon thee. Mar. Make your best haste, and go not Too‑farre i’th Land: 'tis like to be lowd weather, Besides this place is famous for the Creatures
[1430]
Of prey, that keepe vpon’t.
Antig. Go thou away, Ile follow instantly. Mar. I am glad at heart To be so ridde o’th businesse. Exit. Ant.
[1435]
Come, poore babe; I haue heard (but not beleeu’d) the Spirits o’th’dead May walke againe: if such thing be, thy Mother Appear’d to me last night: for ne’re was dreame So like a waking. To me comes a creature,
[1440]
Sometimes her head on one side, some another, I neuer saw a vessell of like sorrow So fill’d, and so becomming: in pure white Robes Like very sanctity she did approach My Cabine where I lay: thrice bow’d before me,
[1445]
And (gasping to begin some speech) her eyes Became two spouts; the furie spent, anon Did this breake from her. Good Antigonus, Since Fate (against thy better disposition) Hath made thy person for the Thrower‑out
[1450]
Of my poore babe, according to thine oath, Places remote enough are in Bohemia, There weepe, and leaue it crying: and for the babe Is counted lost for euer, Perdita I prethee call’t: For this vngentle businesse
[1455]
Put on thee, by my Lord, thou ne’re shalt see Thy Wife Paulina more: and so, with shriekes She melted into Ayre. Affrighted much, I did in time collect my selfe, and thought This was so, and no slumber: Dreames, are toyes,
[1460]
Yet for this once, yea superstitiously, I will be squar’d by this. I do beleeue Hermione hath suffer’d death, and that Apollo would (this being indeede the issue Of King Polixenes) it should heere be laide
[1465]
(Either for life, or death) vpon the earth Of it’s right Father. Blossome, speed thee well, There lye, and there thy charracter: there these, Which may if Fortune please, both breed thee (pretty) And still rest thine. The storme beginnes, poore wretch,
[1470]
That for thy mothers fault, art thus expos’d To losse, and what may follow. Weepe I cannot, But my heart bleedes: and most accurst am I To be by oath enioyn’d to this. Farewell, The day frownes more and more: thou’rt like to haue
[1475]
A lullabie too rough: I neuer saw The heauens so dim, by day. A sauage clamor? Well may I get a‑boord: This is the Chace, I am gone foreuer.
Exit pursued by a Beare. Shep.

I would there were no age betweene ten and

[1480]

three and twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest:

for there is nothing (in the betweene) but getting wen­

ches with childe, wronging the Auncientry, stealing,

fighting, hearke you now: would any but these boylde­

braines of nineteene, and two and twenty hunt this wea­

[1485]

ther? They haue scarr’d away two of my best Sheepe,

which I feare the Wolfe will sooner finde then the Mai­

ster; if any where I haue them, 'tis by the sea‑side, brou­

zing of Iuy. Good‑lucke (and’t be thy will) what haue

we heere? Mercy on’s, a Barne? A very pretty barne; A

[1490]

boy, or a Childe I wonder? (A pretty one, a verie prettie

one) sure some Scape; Though I am not bookish, yet I can

Download the digital text and images of the play



 
Scæna Tertia. [Act 3, Scene 3] Enter Antigonus, a Marriner, Babe, Sheepe­ heard, and Clowne. Ant. Thou art perfect then, our ship hath toucht vpon, The Desarts of Bohemia. Mar. I (my Lord) and feare
[1420]
We haue Landed in ill time: the skies looke grimly, And threaten present blusters. In my conscience The heauens with that we haue in hand, are angry, And frowne vpon’s.
Ant. Their sacred wil’s be done: go get a-boord,
[1425]
Looke to thy barke, Ile not be long before I call vpon thee.
Mar. Make your best haste, and go not Too‑farre i’th Land: 'tis like to be lowd weather, Besides this place is famous for the Creatures
[1430]
Of prey, that keepe vpon’t.
Antig. Go thou away, Ile follow instantly. Mar. I am glad at heart To be so ridde o’th businesse. Exit. Ant.
[1435]
Come, poore babe; I haue heard (but not beleeu’d) the Spirits o’th’dead May walke againe: if such thing be, thy Mother Appear’d to me last night: for ne’re was dreame So like a waking. To me comes a creature,
[1440]
Sometimes her head on one side, some another, I neuer saw a vessell of like sorrow So fill’d, and so becomming: in pure white Robes Like very sanctity she did approach My Cabine where I lay: thrice bow’d before me,
[1445]
And (gasping to begin some speech) her eyes Became two spouts; the furie spent, anon Did this breake from her. Good Antigonus, Since Fate (against thy better disposition) Hath made thy person for the Thrower‑out
[1450]
Of my poore babe, according to thine oath, Places remote enough are in Bohemia, There weepe, and leaue it crying: and for the babe Is counted lost for euer, Perdita I prethee call’t: For this vngentle businesse
[1455]
Put on thee, by my Lord, thou ne’re shalt see Thy Wife Paulina more: and so, with shriekes She melted into Ayre. Affrighted much, I did in time collect my selfe, and thought This was so, and no slumber: Dreames, are toyes,
[1460]
Yet for this once, yea superstitiously, I will be squar’d by this. I do beleeue Hermione hath suffer’d death, and that Apollo would (this being indeede the issue Of King Polixenes) it should heere be laide
[1465]
(Either for life, or death) vpon the earth Of it’s right Father. Blossome, speed thee well, There lye, and there thy charracter: there these, Which may if Fortune please, both breed thee (pretty) And still rest thine. The storme beginnes, poore wretch,
[1470]
That for thy mothers fault, art thus expos’d To losse, and what may follow. Weepe I cannot, But my heart bleedes: and most accurst am I To be by oath enioyn’d to this. Farewell, The day frownes more and more: thou’rt like to haue
[1475]
A lullabie too rough: I neuer saw The heauens so dim, by day. A sauage clamor? Well may I get a‑boord: This is the Chace, I am gone foreuer.
Exit pursued by a Beare. Shep.

I would there were no age betweene ten and

[1480]

three and twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest:

for there is nothing (in the betweene) but getting wen­

ches with childe, wronging the Auncientry, stealing,

fighting, hearke you now: would any but these boylde­

braines of nineteene, and two and twenty hunt this wea­

[1485]

ther? They haue scarr’d away two of my best Sheepe,

which I feare the Wolfe will sooner finde then the Mai­

ster; if any where I haue them, 'tis by the sea‑side, brou­

zing of Iuy. Good‑lucke (and’t be thy will) what haue

we heere? Mercy on’s, a Barne? A very pretty barne; A

[1490]

boy, or a Childe I wonder? (A pretty one, a verie prettie

one) sure some Scape; Though I am not bookish, yet I

can reade Waiting‑Gentlewoman in the scape: this has

beene some staire‑worke, some Trunke‑worke, some be­

hinde‑doore worke: they were warmer that got this,

[1495]

then the poore Thing is heere. Ile take it vp for pity, yet

Ile tarry till my sonne come: he hallow’d but euen now.

Whoa‑ho‑hoa.

Enter Clowne. Clo.

Hilloa, loa.

Shep.

What? art so neere? If thou’lt see a thing to

[1500]

talke on, when thou art dead and rotten, come hither:

what ayl’st thou, man?

Clo.

I haue seene two such sights, by Sea & by Land:

but I am not to say it is a Sea, for it is now the skie, be‑twixt

the Firmament and it, you cannot thrust a bodkins

[1505]

point.

Shep.

Why boy, how is it?

Clo.

I would you did but see how it chafes, how it ra­

ges, how it takes vp the shore, but that’s not to the point:

Oh, the most pitteous cry of the poore soules, sometimes

[1510]

to see 'em, and not to see 'em: Now the Shippe boaring

the Moone with her maine Mast, and anon swallowed

with yest and froth, as you’ld thrust a Corke into a hogs‑head.

And then for the Land‑seruice, to see how the

Beare tore out his shoulder‑bone, how he cride to mee

[1515]

for helpe, and said his name was Antigonus, a Nobleman:

But to make an end of the Ship, to see how the Sea flap­

dragon’d it: but first, how the poore soules roared, and

the sea mock’d them: and how the poore Gentleman roa­

red, and the Beare mock’d him, both roaring lowder

[1520]

then the sea, or weather.

Shep.

Name of mercy, when was this boy?

Clo.

Now, now: I haue not wink’d since I saw these

sights: the men are not yet cold vnder water, nor the

Beare halfe din’d on the Gentleman: he’s at it now.

Shep.
[1525]

Would I had bin by, to haue help’d the olde

man.

Clo.

I would you had beene by the ship side, to haue

help’d her; there your charity would haue lack’d footing.

Shep.

Heauy matters, heauy matters: but looke thee

[1530]

heere boy. Now blesse thy selfe: thou met’st with things

dying, I with things new borne. Here’s a sight for thee:

Looke thee, a bearing‑cloath for a Squires childe: looke

thee heere, take vp, take vp (Boy:) open’t: so, let’s see, it

was told me I should be rich by the Fairies. This is some

[1535]

Changeling: open’t: what’s within, boy?

Clo.

You’re a mad olde man: If the sinnes of your

youth are forgiuen you, you’re well to liue. Golde, all

Go d.

Shep.

This is Faiery Gold boy, and 'twill proue so: vp

[1540]

with’t, keepe it close: home, home, the next way. We

are luckie (boy) and to bee so still requires nothing but

secrecie. Let my sheepe go: Come (good boy) the next

way home.

Clo.

Go you the next way with your Findings, Ile go

[1545]

see if the Beare bee gone from the Gentleman, and how

much he hath eaten: they are neuer curst but when they

are hungry: if there be any of him left, Ile bury it.

Shep.

That’s a good deed: if thou mayest discerne by

that which is left of him, what he is, fetch me to th’sight

[1550]

of him.

Clowne.

'Marry will I: and you shall helpe to put him

i’th’ground.

Shep.

'Tis a lucky day, boy, and wee’l do good deeds

on’t.

Exeunt
 

Download the digital text of the play

        
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   <head rend="center">Scæna Tertia.</head>
   <head type="supplied">[Act 3, Scene 3]</head>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Antigonus, a Marriner, Babe, Sheepe­
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   <sp who="#F-wt-ant">
      <speaker rend="italic">Antig.</speaker>
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   <sp who="#F-wt-mar">
      <speaker rend="italic">Mar.</speaker>
      <l n="1433">I am glad at heart</l>
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   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-wt-ant">
      <speaker rend="italic">Ant.</speaker>
      <l n="1435">Come, poore babe;</l>
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      <l n="1437">May walke againe: if such thing be, thy Mother</l>
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      <l n="1448">Since Fate (against thy better disposition)</l>
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      <l n="1458">I did in time collect my selfe, and thought</l>
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      <l n="1461">I will be squar’d by this. I do beleeue</l>
      <l n="1462">
         <hi rend="italic">Hermione</hi>hath suffer’d death, and that</l>
      <l n="1463">
         <hi rend="italic">Apollo</hi>would (this being indeede the issue</l>
      <l n="1464">Of King<hi rend="italic">Polixenes</hi>) it should heere be laide</l>
      <l n="1465">(Either for life, or death) vpon the earth</l>
      <l n="1466">Of it’s right Father. Blossome, speed thee well,</l>
      <l n="1467">There lye, and there thy charracter: there these,</l>
      <l n="1468">Which may if Fortune please, both breed thee (pretty)</l>
      <l n="1469">And still rest thine. The storme beginnes, poore wretch,</l>
      <l n="1470">That for thy mothers fault, art thus expos’d</l>
      <l n="1471">To losse, and what may follow. Weepe I cannot,</l>
      <l n="1472">But my heart bleedes: and most accurst am I</l>
      <l n="1473">To be by oath enioyn’d to this. Farewell,</l>
      <l n="1474">The day frownes more and more: thou’rt like to haue</l>
      <l n="1475">A lullabie too rough: I neuer saw</l>
      <l n="1476">The heauens so dim, by day. A sauage clamor?</l>
      <l n="1477">Well may I get a‑boord: This is the Chace,</l>
      <l n="1478">I am gone foreuer.</l>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exit pursued by a Beare.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1479">I would there were no age betweene ten and
      <lb n="1480"/>three and twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest:
      <lb n="1481"/>for there is nothing (in the betweene) but getting wen­
      <lb n="1482"/>ches with childe, wronging the Auncientry, stealing,
      <lb n="1483"/>fighting, hearke you now: would any but these boylde­
      <lb n="1484"/>braines of nineteene, and two and twenty hunt this wea­
      <lb n="1485"/>ther? They haue scarr’d away two of my best Sheepe,
      <lb n="1486"/>which I feare the Wolfe will sooner finde then the Mai­
      <lb n="1487"/>ster; if any where I haue them, 'tis by the sea‑side, brou­
      <lb n="1488"/>zing of Iuy. Good‑lucke (and’t be thy will) what haue
      <lb n="1489"/>we heere? Mercy on’s, a Barne? A very pretty barne; A
      <lb n="1490"/>boy, or a Childe I wonder? (A pretty one, a verie prettie
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         <cb n="1"/>
         
      <lb n="1492"/>can reade Waiting‑Gentlewoman in the scape: this has
      <lb n="1493"/>beene some staire‑worke, some Trunke‑worke, some be­
      <lb n="1494"/>hinde‑doore worke: they were warmer that got this,
      <lb n="1495"/>then the poore Thing is heere. Ile take it vp for pity, yet
      <lb n="1496"/>Ile tarry till my sonne come: he hallow’d but euen now.
      <lb n="1497"/>Whoa‑ho‑hoa.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic center" type="entrance">Enter Clowne.</stage>
   <sp who="#F-wt-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1498">Hilloa, loa.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1499">What? art so neere? If thou’lt see a thing to
      <lb n="1500"/>talke on, when thou art dead and rotten, come hither:
      <lb n="1501"/>what ayl’st thou, man?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1502">I haue seene two such sights, by Sea &amp; by Land:
      <lb n="1503"/>but I am not to say it is a Sea, for it is now the skie, be‑twixt
      <lb n="1504"/>the Firmament and it, you cannot thrust a bodkins
      <lb n="1505"/>point.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1506">Why boy, how is it?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1507">I would you did but see how it chafes, how it ra­
      <lb n="1508"/>ges, how it takes vp the shore, but that’s not to the point:
      <lb n="1509"/>Oh, the most pitteous cry of the poore soules, sometimes
      <lb n="1510"/>to see 'em, and not to see 'em: Now the Shippe boaring
      <lb n="1511"/>the Moone with her maine Mast, and anon swallowed
      <lb n="1512"/>with yest and froth, as you’ld thrust a Corke into a hogs‑head.
      <lb n="1513"/>And then for the Land‑seruice, to see how the
      <lb n="1514"/>Beare tore out his shoulder‑bone, how he cride to mee
      <lb n="1515"/>for helpe, and said his name was<hi rend="italic">Antigonus</hi>, a Nobleman:
      <lb n="1516"/>But to make an end of the Ship, to see how the Sea flap­
      <lb n="1517"/>dragon’d it: but first, how the poore soules roared, and
      <lb n="1518"/>the sea mock’d them: and how the poore Gentleman roa­
      <lb n="1519"/>red, and the Beare mock’d him, both roaring lowder
      <lb n="1520"/>then the sea, or weather.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1521">Name of mercy, when was this boy?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1522">Now, now: I haue not wink’d since I saw these
      <lb n="1523"/>sights: the men are not yet cold vnder water, nor the
      <lb n="1524"/>Beare halfe din’d on the Gentleman: he’s at it now.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1525">Would I had bin by, to haue help’d the olde
      <lb n="1526"/>man.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1527">I would you had beene by the ship side, to haue
      <lb n="1528"/>help’d her; there your charity would haue lack’d footing.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1529">Heauy matters, heauy matters: but looke thee
      <lb n="1530"/>heere boy. Now blesse thy selfe: thou met’st with things
      <lb n="1531"/>dying, I with things new borne. Here’s a sight for thee:
      <lb n="1532"/>Looke thee, a bearing‑cloath for a Squires childe: looke
      <lb n="1533"/>thee heere, take vp, take vp (Boy:) open’t: so, let’s see, it
      <lb n="1534"/>was told me I should be rich by the Fairies. This is some
      <lb n="1535"/>Changeling: open’t: what’s within, boy?</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1536">You’re a mad olde man: If the sinnes of your
      <lb n="1537"/>youth are forgiuen you, you’re well to liue. Golde, all
      <lb n="1538"/>Go<gap extent="1"
              unit="chars"
              reason="illegible"
              agent="inkBlot"
              resp="#LMC"/>d.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1539">This is Faiery Gold boy, and 'twill proue so: vp
      <lb n="1540"/>with’t, keepe it close: home, home, the next way. We
      <lb n="1541"/>are luckie (boy) and to bee so still requires nothing but
      <lb n="1542"/>secrecie. Let my sheepe go: Come (good boy) the next
      <lb n="1543"/>way home.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clo.</speaker>
      <p n="1544">Go you the next way with your Findings, Ile go
      <lb n="1545"/>see if the Beare bee gone from the Gentleman, and how
      <lb n="1546"/>much he hath eaten: they are neuer curst but when they
      <lb n="1547"/>are hungry: if there be any of him left, Ile bury it.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1548">That’s a good deed: if thou mayest discerne by
      <lb n="1549"/>that which is left of him, what he is, fetch me to th’sight
      <lb n="1550"/>of him.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-clo">
      <speaker rend="italic">Clowne.</speaker>
      <p n="1551">'Marry will I: and you shall helpe to put him
      <lb n="1552"/>i’th’ground.</p>
   </sp>
   <sp who="#F-wt-osh">
      <speaker rend="italic">Shep.</speaker>
      <p n="1553">'Tis a lucky day, boy, and wee’l do good deeds
      <lb n="1554"/>on’t.</p>
   </sp>
   <stage rend="italic rightJustified" type="exit">Exeunt</stage>
   <cb n="2"/>
</div>

        
        

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